The Importance of Reading Ernest discussion

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Cat in the Rain > First Impressions

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message 1: by Brad (new)

Brad (judekyle) | 219 comments Mod
I always like to kick off discussions with first impressions, so whatta y'all think?


message 2: by Brad (new)

Brad (judekyle) | 219 comments Mod
What I love most about this story is the way I can feel the heat and the rain. It makes me feel like I've actually been there, wherever there is, and that I have lived that moment. It is tactile, and represents the connection to the senses that I love so much about Hemingway.

I also imagine the cat to have six toes.


message 3: by Arthur (new)

Arthur | 21 comments Six toes? ha. I.ah think, some women like to have attraction to simpler living. Some will come to see they need that comfort, suffer rheumatism, and have witnesses (children) and kittens. It is a solar clock ticking that will work to bring autumn similar to an ancient paganism.

The American wife is social and a snob. She thinks she can live cheaply and is acting earnest for her husband. She can look at herself in mirror. But is still in wanting. She saw the kitten and instead of her embarrassment she tries loving a cat.

George and his American wife have marked influences in this hotel. They are learning the language. They submit to being and under going American changing like tourist do when traveling in foreign lands.

George is overly patient I find, on the point of masking his anger or is it too rude to suggest his worry of his wife’s changes in life worries him and as a George it could be upsetting him.



message 4: by Brad (new)

Brad (judekyle) | 219 comments Mod
Arthur wrote: "The American wife is social and a snob. She thinks she can live cheaply and is acting earnest for her husband. She can look at herself in mirror. But is still in wanting. She saw the kitten and instead of her embarrassment she tries loving a cat...."

That was definitely something that struck me in this story. The whole idea of the American woman "wanting." So much of what she says and does is driven by that. Nice suggestion, Arthur. I am going to open a new thread to deal with that. Thanks for the first impressions.




message 5: by Ruth (new)

Ruth Lately I've been reading a lot of large books with long sentences and a Hemingway short story is shocking in its shortness. But I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was very visual for me.

I was struck by the woman's wants also. But I attributed it to her youth.

I'm going to read it again after a bit.




message 6: by Brad (last edited Jan 29, 2009 10:43AM) (new)

Brad (judekyle) | 219 comments Mod
Shortness is nice sometimes. I've been reading large books lately too, and that was one of the reasons I started the group, hoping to get back to reading more short stories. Thanks for joining us, Ruth. Glad to have more people finding us and jumping in. Don't forget to vote in the poll for our next story.


message 7: by Ruth (new)

Ruth I hate to admit this, but I'm not familiar with many Hemingway stories. I'll go with majority and look forward to discussing them with y'all!





message 8: by Miloš & Brontë (last edited Jan 30, 2009 09:54AM) (new)

Miloš & Brontë (MiloBront) | 1 comments Brontë says (4 years old, after having it read out loud to her): I loved that that wife tried to bring the cat in, but somebody else did for her, and that was very nice. I like that the boy keeps reading his book too.


message 9: by Ruth (new)

Ruth Brontë and I like a lot of the same things! Maybe I've met my reading soulmate!





message 10: by Brad (new)

Brad (judekyle) | 219 comments Mod
Ruth wrote: "Brontë and I like a lot of the same things! Maybe I've met my reading soulmate!"

She'll be very pleased to here it, but she's out playing in the sun room with Miloš, so I'll have to tell her when she's done ;).


message 11: by Gio (new)

Gio (giobannaschlitz) i found the woman to be heart braking. to me, its like she doesn't know what she wants, so in the end she wants everything. to me, that's a life wasted. not knowing what you want from life.

or maybe she's just so focused on wanting something that she can't sit back and enjoy what she has




message 12: by Brad (new)

Brad (judekyle) | 219 comments Mod
Gio wrote: "maybe she's just so focused on wanting something that she can't sit back and enjoy what she has..."

I felt that myself. There was a simple enjoyment on George's part of just lying around with the book and being that she didn't have. She was almost frantic to have something, and I wanted her to sit still and just enjoy where she was and something simple -- just for her.


message 13: by Gary (last edited Mar 06, 2010 10:55AM) (new)

Gary | 400 comments Mod
I really liked this story a lot. I too could feel the heat,and the wetness of the rain. I found it interesting that Hemingway kept saying the wife liked the man behind the desk so much. she liked everything about him. his looks, even his hands,and george came across to me as being cranky! he's like-- let the wife get what she wants without bothering him. he's too busy reading,and ignoring her. and then the man, that she likes so much said she needed the cat,and he sent the housekeeper up to her with the wet kitty.


message 14: by Gary (last edited Mar 06, 2010 10:52AM) (new)

Gary | 400 comments Mod
We all also know that hemingway adored cats,and so did mark twain ! that in itself intriques me of both of those men,and hemingway comments on how twain set the pace for the great american novel. i have a quote of that on my "old" royal typewriter, in the roller, with a picture of hemingway on it too. hemingway used royal typewriters!


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