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Discuss Pride & Prejudice 2009 > General Thoughts on the Story

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message 1: by SarahC, Austen Votary & Mods' Asst. (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1473 comments Mod
Discuss thoughts or comments relating to the novel in general and/or Austen overall.


message 2: by Luiza (new)

Luiza | 6 comments ~some Emma's and NA's spoilers~

I think it's interesting to see how Jane Austen heroes are usually men who help women see their own faults and build their character. Not all of them, obviously, but isn't that what Mr.Darcy, and Mr.Tilney, and Mr.Knightley do?


message 3: by Kathryn (last edited Feb 04, 2009 01:51PM) (new)

Kathryn | 98 comments Yes, I think so. Some people comment that they do not like the "fathering" that Mr. Knightley does (though I beg to differ!) yet they don't seem to see the same quality in Mr. Darcy. (It's been awhile since my literary encounter with Mr. Tilney so I can't say.) The gripe is that Mr. K is "molding" her too much--this is viewed as anti-feminist. I tend to see it that he (and Darcy) are rather helping Emma and Elizabeth realize within themselves what their good and bad qualities are--they respect these women and the fact that they CAN become something more--the very fact that they spend time having intellectual discussions with women seems to me very broad-minded of them and thus I view it as a positive trait in the men, rather than a negative. Also note that, certainly in Elizabeth's case, she also helped Darcy (and I think, to an extent, Emma helped balance out Mr. Knightley) so it was not a one-sided dea. (I also tend to think that about modern relationships, though, too--I don't want a man who completely dotes on me and thinks I'm already the end-all perfect woman (though, obviously, some adoration is nice!) A good challenge or soul-searching now and then is a good thing, especially if prompted by one's other half and if it is a mutual, equal relationship. GROWTH is the thing.)


message 4: by Ann (last edited Feb 20, 2009 05:56PM) (new)

Ann | 69 comments ***SPOILERS***

Very well said, Kathryn! I second your thoughts completely!

I wonder if part of it has to do with the fact that Austen does such a good job of writing "good" heroines that do have faults. They are good, smart, kind people, but - like the humans they are meant to be - aren't totally perfect. Their faults are minor, but they are there, and perhaps it is the men in their lives that are strong enough (and good enough themselves) to call them out...??? Often times it is both ways (best seen, IMO, in P&P), where the "good" make each other even "better."


message 5: by Ann (last edited Feb 24, 2009 10:24AM) (new)

Ann | 69 comments ***P&P SPOILERS***

Here's a question I've had for a while. It mostly stems from the BBC version (since it's been a while since I read the book), so perhaps those of you with a fresher look at the novel can answer.
Do you think Elizabeth's Aunt, Mrs. Gardiner, suspects the Elizabeth has feelings for Darcy? In the BBC version, it seems to me that she's sort of hinting that she is aware of Elizabeth's growing affections, but I can't be sure... Was there any more clarity on this in the novel? Any more perspectives?


message 6: by Summer (new)

Summer | 8 comments ***P&P SPOILERS***

@message 5 Ann "Do you think Elizabeth's Aunt, Mrs. Gardiner, suspects the Elizabeth has feelings for Darcy? In the BBC version, it seems to me that she's sort of hinting that she is aware of Elizabeth's growing affections, but I can't be sure... Was there any more clarity on this in the novel? Any more perspectives?"

It's pretty clear in the novel. When Elizabeth finds out about Lydia, Mrs. Gardiner is shocked that she has told Darcy. "And are they upon such terms as for her to disclose the real truth? Oh, that I knew how it was!" Later, in a letter, Mrs. Gardiner writes that she finds young people to be very sly and hopes to ride around Pemberly in "a low phaeton, with a nice little pair of ponies."


message 7: by Ann (new)

Ann | 69 comments Thanks, Summer! That helps!:D


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