History of the American Revolution discussion

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Most significant event of the revolution

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message 1: by Patrick (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:19PM) (new)

Patrick | 6 comments What do you think was the most important event of the Revolutionary period?

Was it the Boston Tea Party or the Boston Massacre? The convening of the Second Continental Congress? The signing of the Declaration of Independence? The shots fired at Lexington and Concord? Washington assuming command of the Continental Army in Boston? One of the battles? Shay's Rebellion?

Let's hear what you think!


message 2: by Brad (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:19PM) (new)

Brad Hart I'm going to go with an event that ocurred before everything we learn about: The French & Indian War. I think that war was the catalyst for virtually everything that followed. The Stamp Act was created to help pay for the war debt, which in turn caused Britain to pass the Declaratory Act. The Declaratory Act was created in response to the strong protests of the colonies. I think that the French & Indian War (also known as the 7 Years War) is a major factor that is often overlooked. It also forced the colonies to give major assistance to one another for the first time.


message 3: by Fred (new)

Fred   Provoncha (unclefred) | 5 comments Hmmm, can I add the taking of Carillion/Ticonderoga and Point a la Chevelure/Crown Point) We have nothing to fight with without the weapons and amunition captured there, the British would still be sitting in Charlestown harbor....Tricorner Hats off to Arnold, Allen and Knox!


message 4: by Fred (new)

Fred   Provoncha (unclefred) | 5 comments Hmmm, can I add the taking of Carillion/Ticonderoga and Point a la Chevelure/Crown Point) We have nothing to fight with without the weapons and amunition captured there, the British would still be sitting in Charlestown harbor....Tricorner Hats off to Arnold, Allen and Knox!


message 5: by Patrick (new)

Patrick | 6 comments Fred, on behalf of all two of the active members of this group, welcome and thanks for your comment! Just checked out your Goodreads profile, and I saw that you mention you're a local historian and museum guy. Do you work at or volunteer at the Fort Ticonderoga National Historic Landmark? Is that run by the National park Service, New York State, or a private group?

(For future visitors to this thread, check it out at:

http://www.fort-ticonderoga.org/



message 6: by Fred (new)

Fred   Provoncha (unclefred) | 5 comments There are 4 museums in Ti, The Fort museum, the Hetitage museum (mine) www.ticonderogaheritagemuseum.org, the Ti Historical Society, and the cartoon museum..:-) We all work together, and do lectures in the off season. My museum is about 1 mile from the Fort (which is a Private org on state land)


message 7: by Brad (new)

Brad Hart I want to second everything Patrick said...welcome to the group!


message 8: by Fred (new)

Fred   Provoncha (unclefred) | 5 comments Merci Boucoup..:-)
www.rootsweb.com/~nyessex
is another one of my "distractions" fvp


message 9: by Fred (new)

Fred | 1 comments Hi all,

Sorry to join in so late but I truly think this Graveyard shift is killing me. LOL

I think one of the most important events of the war is the Battle of Bennington in 1777.

1. The American victory stopped cold the British plan to split the American Colonies in half.

2. It was one of the main events that brought the French into the war.

3. And maybe most important, it brought the Americans together as a fighting force. They were no longer just rebels, but an Army more than able to take on and win against the British.

Great group with great comments. I'll try to add more.


message 10: by Mary (new)

Mary (marybt) Kings Mountain.


message 11: by Jeffrey (new)

Jeffrey | 8 comments After reading Washington's Crossing by David Hackett Fischer, I'm strongly inclined to go with the Battle of/for Trenton. It's a great book.


message 12: by Selena (new)

Selena Joy Layden (selenajoylayden) | 4 comments This may seem a little obvious, but I really think the single most important event of the Revolutionary period was the signing of the Declaration of Independence. This document is so important to the formation of the United States. The document played an important role too in prompting the Continental Army to band together. Washington read the document to his men to motivate them. The document also banded the colonies together as a single entity in dealing with the crown rather than a few disgruntled separate colonies. I also think that the drafting of the Declaration was such an important opportunity for the Founding Fathers to come together and determine what they could agree upon so they could work together. I also think that this is one of the few events that most Americans still remember from the American Revolution today.


message 13: by Harold (new)

Harold Titus (haroldtitus) | 1 comments A cause-and-effect chain of events culminated in Washington's victory at Yorktown. It's difficult to say that any one event was vastly more important than the others. At several junctures during the run-up to armed conflict Britain could have resolved her problems with the colonies. During the early years of the war, she could have prevailed at least in crushing Washington's army. Had that happened, would she have had the wisdom to negotiate and resolve differences? Probably not. Our history in becoming an independent nation would certainly have been different. It's amazing that events turned out as they did.


message 14: by Selena (new)

Selena Joy Layden (selenajoylayden) | 4 comments I definitely agree there were many events that ultimately led to the victory at Yorktown. A post by Harold mentioned that Britain could have resolved the problems with the colonies at several junctures. I agree that Britain's obstinacy was a major issue that led to the outbreak of war and the length of time it took for things to be resolved. I'm curious what others believe. Would an early resolution with Britain have completely avoided an event like the American Revolution or was it inevitable that the colonies would ask and ultimately fight for their independence from Britain?


message 15: by Jeffrey (new)

Jeffrey | 8 comments I think the conflict was avoidable. The most significant "event" was the decision by Parliament/King G3 to NOT extend greater recognition of self-rule and increased representation in Parliament to the Colonies. Might have stopped the whole Revolution before it began. Second, I'd choose the decision of the British government that the Colonies paled in strategic and economic value to the West Indies and weren't nearly as worth committing military resources to.
In terms of a more specific event, David Hackett Fischer has me convinced that Princeton was the point where the British Army could have snuffed the revolt.


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