The Rory Gilmore Book Club discussion

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Rory Book Discussions > HOI - Dinah the Christmas Whore (Chapter 3)

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message 1: by Sarah (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:14PM) (new)

Sarah (songgirl7) I liked this story best, for two reasons: 1. I used to live in the Raleigh area and have been to the Crabtree mall and also to a K&W cafeteria; and 2. I thought this one had the best message, although the more I think about it, the more questions it raises.

At first, I thought the family was really wonderful for taking Dinah in and treating her with kindness. But I have to admit, I have very little pity on those who continue to make the terrible choices which keep them in a life like Dinah's. I don't feel sorry for drug users; they should have never picked up that first needle. I don't feel sorry for prostitutes, even at Christmas; they choose to sell themselves. Just as an example, in Pretty Woman when Julia Roberts says to Richard Gere "You've never treated me like a prostitute until now" I yelled at the TV, "But you ARE a prostitute!"

I do think that these people need kindness and compassion, however, as I really believe that the only way they can turn their lives around is if someone shows them how. I just have a hard time remembering that when I think about how they got in their situation in the first place.

Maybe I am just a terrible person.


message 2: by Blanca (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:15PM) (new)

Blanca | 26 comments "Dinah the Christmas Whore" was the best essay for me as well. The other chapters meandered between humorous essays and others were really bad fiction. As he remembers his prospective future adventures on tv with his monkey, I enjoyed how well he wrote about his adolescent limitations to have any profound observations.

I loved how the young David is pulled into a rescue mission with his sister, discovers that his crazy family is not only brave, but compassionate and even a little glamorous, spending the holiday drinking with a whore. It occurred to me just then that maybe there was something to like about him after all. Just like that. (I loved the last two sentences!)


message 3: by whichwaydidshego, the sage of sass (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:15PM) (new)

whichwaydidshego | 1996 comments Mod
Blanca, really well put - especially the second paragraph.

But I still love SantaLand Diaries. LOL!


message 4: by Meghan (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:16PM) (new)

Meghan This was my second favorite. Okay, I only enjoyed two but hey, he only wrote two from seemingly personal experiences.

My favorite part was just in the beginning when he was talking about the show he came up with about him and the chimp. "Go for the eyes Socrates!" I can so picture a boy dreaming that up. I know several who fit that description.

My other favorite part is when he says how difficult it is to come up with the moral lesson tag line at the end of each episode because nothing ever comes to him like that. I just laughed out loud because it just seemed to honest. How many of us think "oh I could have written that" or "I could do that job"...but if we really sat down and thought it through, could you really do that week after week?

I also enjoyed that he hoped to garner some inside pearls of moral lessons from the work-release folk. I know boys who would have tried that one too.

This part just reminded me of "Me Talk Pretty". I liked that book because it's just about him and his family. And his family is pretty funny. What his sisters (Lisa and Amy) do to him (and vice versa) is great.


message 5: by Meghan (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:17PM) (new)

Meghan This is the line I liked best:

"...the hard part was thinking up the all-important revelation. 'It suddenly occurred to me that...' That what? Things hardly ever occurred to me."

I don't know that struck me funny. And after reading the rest of the book, ironically or sadly, Socrates and Company may have been his best idea that occurred to him.


message 6: by Meghan (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:17PM) (new)

Meghan Oh, and this one made me laugh out loud. Only because I spent 7 months in China and that's what they complain about...how all the lao wei (foreigners) look alike...which is funny 'cause that's what all Americans say about Asians.

"It's was no wonder the Chinese people couldn't tell them apart."


message 7: by Shannon, the founder of fun (back from sabbatical) (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:19PM) (new)

Shannon | 254 comments Mod
Meghan I agree - I really enjoyed that line

"...the hard part was thinking up the all-important revelation. 'It suddenly occurred to me that...' That what? Things hardly ever occurred to me."

How human.

Blanca I love your insights! What an insane adventure.


message 8: by Arielle (new)

Arielle | 120 comments Things are looking up. This one was a little sweetish. The Socrates part was classic (Oh, teenagers and their daydreams), and I really liked how he discovered that his 2 dimensional sister actually had another deeper side to her. That's cool when you look at your family as people instead of the bane of your existence. I loved how welcoming his mom was to their..ahem..unconventional Christmas surprise. I hope that I can be that classy in crazy circumstances one day.


message 9: by whichwaydidshego, the sage of sass (new)

whichwaydidshego | 1996 comments Mod
Arielle, after what you said, I kinda liked this story. LOL Really great insights!


message 10: by Alison, the guru of grace (new)

Alison | 1282 comments Mod
Meghan, the line that follows yours I had underlined: It might occasionally strike me that I'd broken a glass or filled the machine with too much detergent, but the larger issues tended to elude me."

I love it when his sister Amy chipperly asks the prostitute, "How much does it cost for just a spanking?"

The insight, and what makes this story special to me, starts with "Every gathering has it's moment" and goes 'til the end. To me, the beauty of this story is how he has experienced something "real" with his family, even in an unexpected package. They are bonded by this shared experience together, that is much more genuine than the usual holiday cliches.


message 11: by whichwaydidshego, the sage of sass (new)

whichwaydidshego | 1996 comments Mod
Good point, Alison.


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