Latino and Latin American Literature discussion

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New Writers

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message 1: by Patricio (new)

Patricio In your opinion which are the best latin american novel authors ? Galera, Ospina, Bolaños, Guillermo Martinez ? I liked Alan Pauls ( Argentina ) and Verissimo ( Brasil ) but I would like to know your opinion.


message 2: by Daniel (new)

Daniel (elchucotografo) | 1 comments I am a big fan of Roberto Bolaño but Mario Vargas Llosa is my personal favorite. Also think that Junot Diaz has a chance to become one of the all time greats. Drown is a wonderful book. But do you lump his work in as being sufficiently Latino for being centered on the immigrant's experience? Personally, I do but I understand that many do not. He is the next generation and he is night and day different from the greats of the past.


message 3: by Amandasaved (new)

Amandasaved | 8 comments The author of The Dark Bride, Lauren Restrepo (Colombia) was the best one I've read in years. Also as far as mystery writers go, Carolina Garcia-Aguilera (Cuban-American) was amazing.


message 4: by Noreen (new)

Noreen | 5 comments Daniel Sada (Mexico)


message 5: by Amandasaved (new)

Amandasaved | 8 comments Corretion: Laura Restrepo.


message 6: by A.A. (last edited Aug 22, 2009 08:07AM) (new)

A.A. Alvarez (aaalvarez) | 1 comments Hello lovers of Latin American literature.

I would like to contribute to this list with a Spanish author/journalist/ufologist J. J. Benitez. Although he is not Latin American, he does write in Spanish. He is famous for his "Caballo de Troya" series and I found his book, "Los Austronautas de Yave" quite engaging.

As the topic's title is "New Writers", I'd like to also take this opportunity to introduce myself.

My name is Alex (A. A. Alvarez) and I am Venezuelan. I'm also the author of Chronicles of a Nomad: Memoirs of an Immigrant. Its contemporary style is a mix between historical fiction and memoir, and though it would best fit inside the "social issues/immigration" category in a library, much of the book is focused on Latin American culture and education.

Chronicles of a Nomad Memoirs of an Immigrant by A. A. Alvarez

I wrote and published my original work in English and joined this group because I will be publishing the Spanish edition soon. I'm hoping I could gather some useful feedback from you guys.

My target audience was originally composed of English speaking Latin Americans abroad only, but I've received so many requests for a Spanish edition that I decided to write it and "aim it" for a Spanish speaking audience as well... and I would very much welcome your comments.

Thank you for this community and if any of you would like to preview a sneak peak, let me know.

http://www.aaalvarez.com/reviews.html


message 7: by Amandasaved (new)

Amandasaved | 8 comments Are we aloud to self-promote?

In that case, I write mystery novels and latina-lit and my first mystery is scheduled to be published next year by Wine Press. Also, my weekly blog is: mandymaria.blogspot.com




message 8: by Mel (new)

Mel (shiframel) | 1 comments AA,
I just looked at the review for your book and will definitely be adding it to my "to read" list. I teach ESL to high school students and I'm always on the lookout for literature that will catch their interest and speak to them on a personal level.

Melissa


message 9: by John (new)

John (ghostgrove) | 1 comments I like Alberto Chimal (Mexico) - very dark and comic or Martin Solares (Mexico) who explores corruption with an eye for detail.

Also Enrique Serna, Cesar Aira, Juan Villoro.


message 10: by Amandasaved (new)

Amandasaved | 8 comments The Red Envelope is a Lation focused mystery novel which takes place in Lehigh Valley PA. I hight recommend it. The Author is Amanda Lima


message 11: by Jason (new)

Jason Chaplin (jasondanielchaplin) | 3 comments Me. I wrote a book and I'm Mexican-American. Cheers.


message 12: by Franco (new)

Franco Olcese | 1 comments I would say Jorge Luis Borges, he is outstanding. I like a lot Mario Vargas Llosa's stories, he describes peruvian reality very good, what a shame i -and i lot of peruvians- consider him a hateful human being. But i have to confess i don't know several authors you mentioned before.


message 13: by Clark (last edited Nov 15, 2012 08:27AM) (new)

Clark Zlotchew | 4 comments Jason wrote: "Me. I wrote a book and I'm Mexican-American. Cheers."
Jason, Do you consider yourself a Latin American writer?
In what language is your book?


message 14: by Clark (last edited Nov 15, 2012 08:44AM) (new)

Clark Zlotchew | 4 comments Jason makes me think, "What constitutes a Latin American writer?
There is a Central American-born writer in California, whose native language is Spanish (family names Kattan Zablah). His short stories are in Spanish, and the themes reflect life in Central America. I think he would be classified as a Latin American author.
--I've written short stories in both my English and Spanish versions. Strangely, more of those stories have been published in my Spanish versions than my English versions. (My native language is English.) The Spanish versions appeared in literary magazines of Uruguay, Argentina, Mexico and the state of Colorado.
When I attended a conference on Latin American writers in the U.S., I read parts of one of my Spanish version stories. This was in University of Texas, Panamerican quite some years ago. (Edinburg, TX, right across the Rio Grande (Rio Bravo) from Reinosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico.
The classroom in which my session took place was crowded, completely filled with both students and local community adults, all native-Spanish speakers. Their reaction to my readings was absolutely enthusiastic and appreciative. Someone asked me if I had a book of my stories for sale, and I had to say that I did not. A couple of the participants said I was an honorary Spanish-American writer. (Most of my short stories, in English version, are now a collection: Once Upon a Decade: Tales of the Fifties.)
So, what do you think? Am I an honorary Spanish-American author?


message 15: by Jason (new)

Jason Chaplin (jasondanielchaplin) | 3 comments Yes. I consider myself a Latin American. Though, I shouldn't consider myself a writer because it's not up to me to decide that.

Yes. I enjoy reading Latin American literature. It's the surreal, metaphysical, and magical realism elements rendered from Latin American fiction that inspire me to sit down and come up with new ideas, and also, elaborate upon older ones.

My entire life has been - somewhat - shaped by Latin American traditions, norms, and mores. And it shows in my writing - even though I don't write in Spanish. And I don't plan on it anytime soon.

Cheers.


message 16: by Clark (last edited Dec 02, 2012 01:50PM) (new)

Clark Zlotchew | 4 comments Jason wrote: "Yes. I consider myself a Latin American. Though, I shouldn't consider myself a writer because it's not up to me to decide that.

Yes. I enjoy reading Latin American literature. It's the surreal, me..."


Well, now this makes me wonder "What is a Latin American? Jason, you don't speak Spanish. And you weren't born in the countries considered Latin America (countries in which the official language is Spanish or Portuguese). Maybe it would be more accurate to say you're of Latin-American descent. But if you were born in the USA and only speak English, you're a (North) American. So you're neither a Latin American or a writer.


message 17: by Jason (new)

Jason Chaplin (jasondanielchaplin) | 3 comments Clark wrote: "Jason wrote: "Yes. I consider myself a Latin American. Though, I shouldn't consider myself a writer because it's not up to me to decide that.

Yes. I enjoy reading Latin American literature. It's t..."


You're assuming this and that about me and we've never even met. I do, in fact, speak Spanish. I was born just short of ten miles from the border of Mexico (my mother actually went into labor with me while visiting relatives in Mexico, and left back home to have me delivered in the States). So, I would advise you to not make assumptions about me ever again; especially since you're not even a has-been or a hack, but a "never was". Cheers.


message 18: by Ebby (new)

Ebby Tollinchi (ebbyreads) | 2 comments Jason wrote: "Yes. I consider myself a Latin American. Though, I shouldn't consider myself a writer because it's not up to me to decide that.

Yes. I enjoy reading Latin American literature. It's the surreal, me..."


If you have poured your heart into (and actually completed) a written piece and you dare to maybe do it again, you are indeed a writer. :)

Your readers will give you feedback as to whether they consider you a "good" writer, and publishers will determine whether you are a "publishable" writer. But, hey, being a writer in and of itself is pretty awesome. Bask in the awesomeness!


message 19: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Jr. (goodreadscomthomasbarrjr) | 5 comments The Best Seller Notorious P Man Sam Free Preview on Amazon

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Preview Book on Amazon @ http://www.amazon.com/Notorious-P-Man...


message 20: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Jr. (goodreadscomthomasbarrjr) | 5 comments I enjoy Latin American Literature.


message 21: by Thomas (new)

Thomas Jr. (goodreadscomthomasbarrjr) | 5 comments You all must read my new Book, RISEN: The accession and devolution of Yahweh Ben Yahweh: Miami's Urban Chronicles Volume 1. It comes out on January 1, 2016.


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