Tropic of Cancer Tropic of Cancer discussion


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Why the crap is everyone reading Tropic of Cancer?

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message 1: by Josh (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:12PM) (new)

Josh I mean seriously, folks. was that episode of Seinfeld on this week, and I just missed it?


Meghan Pochebit An ill fated book club started in December, first book being Tropic of Cancer. I have my sights set on a revival soon!

p.s. I don't know how to use this social networking device and am unsure who will see what I'm writing right now.


message 3: by Josh (new)

Josh everyone who is friends with you sees your comment in their update feed, and people in your friends group can access this thread from the "Tropic of Cancer" main page by clicking on "Why the crap is everyone reading Tropic of Cancer?" under "Discuss this book." When does the book club start up again, and what is next??


daVe! paige good question, briggsington. I'm just about to finish the thing. everyone else was doing, so i had to too. but i'm glad I did. this shit rules.






message 5: by Jesse (new)

Jesse I can only assume that there is some kind of Seinfield revival theme going around...


the transmediator Read it because it is gorgeous prose. If people don't get it because they fail to contextualize historically, because they are offended by ribald or banal language, because their morals disallow subjective reading of a text, or for whatever other prudish excuse they wish to concoct, it is their loss. Henry Miller can write, period.


message 7: by Jim (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jim Metaphorae wrote: "Henry Miller can write, period..."

Here here!!!


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Henry Miller's a poet that really knew how to whoop it up. His Tropics and Rosy Crucifixion books are the best extended prose poetry I know!


Ruby Hollyberry Read these years ago as a companion to the Nin diaries. Love them!


Robert J I thought this was crap. I just put it down and i can see why it is "relevent" mostly for the time it was written. but i just could not really get into it.


message 11: by Karl (new) - rated it 5 stars

Karl He is one of the true greats.

"Once you have given up the ghost......"


message 12: by Kyle (new) - rated it 5 stars

Kyle I picked this book up on a whim from the library & was very pleasantly surprised! On the surface it's the standard 'American (blank) in (blank)' but the prose was very powerful... & anyways I am an American dang it so I can enjoy his strain being pulled this way & that. I read this book after reading 'Journey to the End of the Night' by Celine & found them to go together very well.


message 13: by Marg (new) - rated it 2 stars

Marg Librarian recommeded this book to me. Mention the history behind it being banned in America. Maybe for its time yes, but it was ok not a book that I would want to re-read again, or go, and pick up another Henry Miller book.


Stela the transmediator wrote: "Read it because it is gorgeous prose. If people don't get it because they fail to contextualize historically, because they are offended by ribald or banal language, because their morals disallow su..."

Yep.


message 15: by Joe (new) - rated it 5 stars

Joe Dwyer "I am fucking you, Tania, so that you’ll stay fucked. And if you’re afraid of being fucked publicly I will fuck you privately."
—Henry Miller, Tropic of Cancer (1934)

"It was the end for me. And yet not an end. In all the years which have since elapsed she remains the woman I loved and lost, the unattainable one [...] I see myself forever and ever as the ridiculous man, the lonely soul, the wanderer, the restless frustrated artist, the man in love with love, always in search of the absolute, always seeking the unattainable"
—Henry Miller, Stand Still like the Hummingbird (1962)

"I wandered aimlessly through this muddy lane bespattered with blood, fragments of the past detached themselves and floated listlessly before my eyes, taunting me with the direst forebodings [...] My world of human beings had perished; I was utterly alone in the world and for friends I had the streets, and the streets spoke to me in that sad, bitter language compounded of human misery, yearning, regret, failure, wasted effort"
—Henry Miller, Tropic of Cancer (1934)

"Even though I felt it might be the last time I saw her I lacked the courage to fling my arms around her and give her a last, passionate kiss. Instead, we shook hands politely, mumbled some awkward words of adieu, and off I walked."
—Henry Miller, Stand Still Like the Hummingbird (1962)


Kelly Joe wrote: ""I am fucking you, Tania, so that you’ll stay fucked. And if you’re afraid of being fucked publicly I will fuck you privately."
—Henry Miller, Tropic of Cancer (1934)

"It was the end for me. And..."


The man is brilliant, and a total freak... Love him.


message 17: by Ruby (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ruby Hollyberry there are some wonderful youtube videos of Henry Miller from the 70's or maybe 60's, talking about his life


message 18: by Josh (new)

Josh Next topic: "Why the crap is everyone on the internet so self-righteous?"

Back in December of 2007, it seemed like everyone on Goodreads was reading Tropic of Cancer. I was indignantly curious, not hating on Hank. He's fine by me. It was just a weird moment.

Anyway, just wanted to historically contextualize my reason for starting this post. I hope it is looked back on as relevant.


message 19: by K.D. (new) - rated it 5 stars

K.D. Parker I read this book thirty years ago and it blew me away. I could not believe it was written in 1934. "It's not about fucking; it's about liberation!"


Feliks Two kinds of reader in the American reading public. Those who try Miller and those who don't. Kind of an acid-test.

Harry Potter is available for everyone who doesn't.


Chris AntaeusQ wrote: "Henry Miller's a poet that really knew how to whoop it up. His Tropics and Rosy Crucifixion books are the best extended prose poetry I know!"

I couldn't agree more! Tropic of Cancer was amazing and Sexus and Nexus were even better!! The third book was a little boring though.


message 22: by Christina (new) - added it

Christina Ruby wrote: "there are some wonderful youtube videos of Henry Miller from the 70's or maybe 60's, talking about his life"

Thanks for sharing I will have to check these out.


Derek McDow B/c it's a-ma-zing!


Feliks Glad to see folks reading Henry Miller instead of Stephanie Meyer or JK Rowling


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