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Fantasy Bazaar > Biggest Fantasy Peeve?

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message 1: by Robert (new)

Robert Eaton (heroalwayswins) | 19 comments What's your biggest peeve when it comes to fantasy books?

For me, it’s heroes that are too powerful. I love a long series, but time and time again I see series start to fall apart after a few books because the hero is too strong. They become the greatest wizard/warrior/whatever that ever lived, and the author ends up jumping through hoops to invent new challenges. A cursed trinket steals the hero’s power away. The hero vanishes for a whole book so the villain can pick on other characters. Some evil spirit possesses the hero and uses their power for evil. So contrived!

What reoccurring themes do you see in fantasy that drive you nuts?


message 2: by M Todd (new)

M Todd Gallowglas (mgallowglas) | 155 comments Mod
Great topic Robert! I'm going to have to consider this one for a while.


message 3: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Kellen (ChristopherKellen) | 48 comments Mod
Robert wrote: "What's your biggest peeve when it comes to fantasy books?

Butcher/farmer/blacksmith's boy. Gah, that one drives me nuts, to the point where if I even see it on the description I'll put the book down and back away quickly. It's the equivalent of "everyone meets in a tavern".

Speaking of which, if someone opens their book with a tavern scene, I will also usually put it down. Something really interesting would have to happen really quickly for that to work in this day and age.


message 4: by Glynn (new)

Glynn James (glynnjames) Actually Christopher, that's what stopped me reading fantasy about ten years ago - "Traditional" fantasy anyway. These days I tend to prefer something a bit more cross-genre, such as fantasy/horror or steampunk. Too many farm boy becomes king books!
Years ago I started my own fantasy novel, and realised that it was exactly that all over again except it was a soldier's son. I gave up on it!


message 5: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Kellen (ChristopherKellen) | 48 comments Mod
Glynn wrote: "Years ago I started my own fantasy novel, and realised that it was exactly that all over again except it was a soldier's son. I gave up on it!"

Man, do I ever hear you on that one. I've been struggling with it myself - I've been toying with doing a YA fantasy project, and finding a way to start off the character that doesn't immediately echo that is actually really difficult.

The other problem is that I tend to like competent heroes (which is why, so far, all of my published heroes are strong people in their prime, or otherwise they're already competent at something), which kind of shuts down the idea of a YA book for me... by definition, those characters don't start out competent, and so I keep losing interest. :/

Do you have any good recommendations on some fantasy/horror crossovers? I'd like to see other people who work in that sort of mixed genre.


message 6: by M Todd (new)

M Todd Gallowglas (mgallowglas) | 155 comments Mod
So, I slept on it. I agree with everything above but the thing that REALLY Ticks me off...

Elves.

I see elves in the product description and I usually groan, long and loud, and I don't read anything more. I'm all for alternate races, even alternate races based on earth mythology, but really? Elves? Can we please move on? Pretty please. We have vast sea of myths and legends to draw from, must we always revert to being Tolkien clones?


message 7: by Megan (new)

Megan | 3 comments Glynn wrote: "Actually Christopher, that's what stopped me reading fantasy about ten years ago - "Traditional" fantasy anyway. These days I tend to prefer something a bit more cross-genre, such as fantasy/horror..."

Ugh yes! Boo to farm boy/blacksmith's apprentice becomes king!

My biggest pet peeve though has to be when things are way too black and white. Like, one side is good and one side is evil, with no nuance. That's not realistic and I find it much more interesting to know and understand and maybe even sympathize with everyone's motivations.


message 8: by M.D. (new)

M.D. Kenning (MDKENNING) | 22 comments Along the lines of M. Todd's post mine would be "Tolkien" or D & D races in general. It would have to be a really fresh take on that subject matter for me to care. That does not mean I will not read non human stories, I just want something original, or at least drawing from a different mythological well.

As for fantasy/horror crossovers I highly recommend the CS Friedman Coldfire trilogy.


message 9: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McPhail (melissagmcphail) | 10 comments Robert wrote: "For me, it’s heroes that are too powerful. I love a long series, but time and time again I see series start to fall apart after a few books..."

Christopher wrote: Butcher/farmer/blacksmith's boy. Gah, that one drives me nuts, to the point where if I even see it on the description I'll ..."

Gentlemen, I entirely agree. Too many smith's boys/apprentices, from The Dragonbone Chair to Seventh Son. And far too many heroes gaining too much power. This was definitely the downfall of David Eddings' Elenium, among others. There's no conflict in an infallible hero, wherein the author is stuck trying to come up with greater and greater demons. It's like a book series made out of Michael Bay movies.

In addition to the above, the five things that bother me the most, and which I've studiously worked to avoid in my own fantasy series, are:

1. Ultimate evil/ultimate good conflict of evil dark lord versus simple farmer's son meant to save the world/become king. I have to agree with Megan here. The ultimate evil/ultimate good conflict is my #1 pet peeve. It's been done well many times over, and badly five times as often. Let's move on.

2. Prophecy. Ugh. Too many prophecies in too many permutations (baby born to save the world, baby born to end the world, girl/boy who will be the downfall of the ultimate evil dark lord...). It's an easy out, using prophecy to solve otherwise vexing plot issues.

3. Elves, trolls, dwarfs, orks et al. There's enough High Fantasy already written that incorporates fantastical creatures if you didn't get enough in LOTR, Shannara or Narnia.

4."Wizard" magic. Spells, incantations, potions. There's such a plethora of ways magic can be made. Can't we be more creative?

5. Whiny, victimized females who just can't seem to get with the program and men who apparently don't know how to communicate a single thought. WOT drives me nuts with this.

The trick is writing fantasy that's still very clearly fantasy without such trite plot elements. I think A.E. Marling did a wonderful job of avoiding these well-worn paths in his book.


message 10: by Laura (new)

Laura (lahreader) | 5 comments There are SO many high fantasy stereotypes! (I'm sure we've all seen the "Fantasy Novelist's Exam") It's pretty sad and, I think, probably the reason I've been pulling away from both reading and writing high fantasy.

My most hated ones are that the antagonist always is the world's version of "the Devil" (or he works for him) and is out to destroy the world, and the hero always starts off having no idea that he has magical powers. The heros also almost always seem to be males in their early to mid 20's. I'm in agreement on it always being a farmer/apprentice/lower class person. Rags to riches again?

You'd think that, in a genre like fantasy, writers would say: "Dash the rules! I'm just making this stuff up as I go!" and come up with something original! The sky's the limit, and yet, they stay tied to things that made others succeed in the past.


message 11: by Zachary Johnson (new)

Zachary Johnson | 3 comments Vampires! I cannot stand that people actually find these creatures worth anyone's time. I can tolerate the Tolkien rip off, and even the over-abused rags to riches tales, as long as people don't use these pathetic creatures anymore. Look it is daylight, I defeat you during the sunny hours. Choose something else from the vast mythos of creatures out there. And not werewolves! Please.


message 12: by S.J. (new)

S.J. Faerlind (sjfaerlind) | 4 comments I will admit that a new idea/concept or exceptional creativity in a story makes me really sit up and take note of it. Still, I won't automatically shun reading any story simply because it contains elves, vampires, quests or other elements of tried-and-true or currently-popular fantasy. I like reading tried-and-true and popular fantasy as much as I like the newer stuff! A well written, compelling story, good characters and a well-built world are what I look for, regardless of what fantastic elements are included by the author. If I refused to read anything with the tried-and-true elements of traditional fantasy, I'd have missed out on tons of great stories that I really enjoyed. :( Paul Dale's "The Dark Lord's Handbook" is a great example of how an author can recombine traditional, often-used, fantasy elements into an original (and hilarious!) read. It's often not the elements that are cliche for me; it's the way they're incorporated into the story.


message 13: by Robert (new)

Robert Eaton (heroalwayswins) | 19 comments I have to admit, some of my favorite books involve farmer/blacksmith's sons and elves. That doesn't mean they're not overdone, of course, but they've provided me plenty of entertainment over the years.

I totally agree on the prophecy thing though. Not only is prophecy over done, but it seems like a lazy plot device. So many characters are motivated to risk their lives and go on crazy adventure just because some old wizard or old book told them to? I’m more inclined to believe the equally lazy damsel in distress storyline than prophecy. I know a lot more people who do dumb things in real life for love than for prophecy.


message 14: by Gregory (new)

Gregory Close (gsclose) | 7 comments I don't I know... If the plot is constructed well and the characters well drawn, then a strong narrative will get me safely across the choppy Sea of Cliche and the dangerous passes of the Mountains of Trope. I agree with Robert that the all-powerful hero is hard to deal with, but I think that's a failure of mechanics and craft rather than being an actual cliche.

That being said... It would take a truly amazing vampire novel to capture and keep my attention at this point!


message 15: by M.D. (new)

M.D. Kenning (MDKENNING) | 22 comments I do however have a special place in my heart for false/misinterpreted prophecy where bad things happen from trying to follow it.


message 16: by D.W. (new)

D.W. Hawkins (dwhawkins) | 6 comments Wow, this is a great thread. It seems to be a common theme among readers that all of the things you guys have pointed out seem to be a problem with the fantasy genre. I have to admit, most of the things you have mentioned tend to make me back away from a novel as well. However...

I think that something can also be said about trying too hard to break from the norm. I've read a couple of books (and I won't name them, so as not to slam the authors) where the story itself is sacrificed to the supposed ingenuity of the world building or the overlying themes the author tries to push. Even if an author is trying to make a valid point, when the characters are unbelievable or the plot isn't well constructed then the book may as well be a whole lot of boring social commentary.

The above mentioned tropes are getting old, though, when they are simply regurgitated by authors and not spun in an original and intriguing way. I have to admit that I still love The Belgariad (I know, a lot of people hate it) but that series is what got me reading Fantasy when I was around 12 years old. If I had picked it up today I might hate it, but it wasn't bad for a 12 year old kid who loved to read.

On the other hand, The Codex Alera contains almost all of the overdone cliches mentioned, but Butcher spins the tale with a light-hearted voice and it comes off quite nicely, I think. Loved the series, personally.

Here's something that bothers me: In Urban Fantasy, when the main character is the gritty, uninteresting guy that is not only wildly good looking, but "the best in the business" at whatever he does. Seems to be a recurring theme in the sub-genre. I tend to enjoy characters who have a hard time making their way through the plot, and grow along the way.

I agree about vamps, though. I'm all about them being slaughtered in droves by characters...but that sparkly-sexy-teenage-wet-dream thing just needs to stop lol.

Sorry if my language has offended anyone, I tend to go on about things. Great thread!


message 17: by Robert (new)

Robert Eaton (heroalwayswins) | 19 comments M.D. wrote: "I do however have a special place in my heart for false/misinterpreted prophecy where bad things happen from trying to follow it."

I totally relate to this. In fact, I rather like it when an author picks some fantasy stereotype and either pokes fun at it or takes it in a totally unexpected direction. It's both entertainment and a commentary on the sometimes tedious state of the genre.


message 18: by Graeme (last edited Jul 03, 2012 10:00AM) (new)

Graeme Smith (graeme_smith) | 6 comments Fantasy peeves. Well and all, you should probably ignore me. After all, I'm an Idiot, or part of me is :-). But...
It's not done so much these days. for me, that's no Bad Thing. But (I know - I already said that. But... :-P), but there used to be this thing. This D+D group would sit down one night to roll some dice, and there'd be this big clap of thunder, or the door-bell would ring, or... or 'something'. And lo! they'd all be in Fantasy Land. In Character.
Sigh :-). Drove me mad, it did. Mostly because the daft buggers would either spend far too much time trying to get back home again (lets see. Homework - or chatting up that hunk barbarian/ foxy sorceress you saw in the Hobbit's Elbow last night - tough call! Not...) or would equally somehow-ish not give a rat and never think of 'back home'.
It wasn't always done badly, for me at least. Guy Gavriel Kay in 'The Fionavar Tapestry' still comes down from my shelf at regular intervals. So does Joy Chant's 'Red Moon and Black Mountain'. But most any other work with this background - not so much :-(.
Thoughts? Comments?


message 19: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Marvello (drmarvello) | 11 comments M.D. wrote: "I have to admit that I still love The Belgariad
...
The Codex Alera contains almost all of the overdone cliches mentioned, but Butcher spins the tale with a light-hearted voice and it comes off quite nicely, I think. Loved the series, personally."


It sounds like we have similar interests in reading material. The Belgariad is one of the few fantasy series I've actually read more than once. I liked the Codex Alera, but I doubt I'll read it again.

My pet peeve is "reluctant hero must save the entire world or universe from ultimate evil." I prefer stakes that are a little more believable and closer to home.

I think my love for mysteries has an influence here. The problems people have with each other are complex enough without having to make it about saving the entire world. I'm also more a fan of character-driven stories than plot-driven, which undoubtedly influences my viewpoint.

I've been reading mostly indie works lately, and I'm finding that many writers have found ways to craft a good story with challenges that I can believe and relate to.


message 20: by Megan (new)

Megan | 3 comments A.K. wrote: "Everyone pretty much hit the nail on the head as far as the stereotypes and cliches are concerned. What drives me nuts as a writers is that the readers are so drowned by these stereotypes that if a..."

I am not one of those readers! I am always looking for something new!


message 21: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Kellen (ChristopherKellen) | 48 comments Mod
M.D. wrote: "I do however have a special place in my heart for false/misinterpreted prophecy where bad things happen from trying to follow it."

Indeed. That's a good way to do something new.

I too have enjoyed books with many of these cliches, but I have put down many more and never finished them. For me, I think it really comes down less to the tropes and trappings and more to whether or not I can quickly relate to the main character (because they're in some kind of believable circumstance) and whether or not the story gets going.

Also! Giant peeve of mine: any story which takes more than 50 pages to start doing ANYTHING AT ALL gets put down. Sorry. This is why I never read The Wheel of Time.


message 22: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McPhail (melissagmcphail) | 10 comments Christopher wrote: "Giant peeve of mine: any story which takes more than 50 pages to start doing ANYTHING AT ALL gets put down. Sorry. This is why I never read The Wheel of Time"

No to take us off topic, but I feel compelled to say,
Christopher, that if you started with Chapter 5 (I think) where the Trollocs overrun the town, you'd be entering the story at a good point and miss all the chapters of nothing happening. The story is worth reading - I think at least through Book 10.

WOT gets a lot of negative commentary, but it was groundbreaking for its time and still shines above a host of others. Many of the tropes mentioned in this thread are included in WOT, but Jordan does them well, and differently, and compellingly for all that there are a thousand things you could pick apart as well. But that's true for any creative work, if such is one's mindset to criticize.

Wheel of Time, I believe, should be on everyone's list, despite the tropes mentioned in this thread. Here's an example in agreement with so many others who've commented here that a good story is worth reading, even if studded with trite plot elements. Jordan did them before they became overdone.


message 23: by Velda (new)

Velda (veldabrotherton) | 3 comments Because I've written one horror novel and love to read King and Koontz, I probably don't belong here, but you hit on my pet peeve and I had to chime in. Hero saving the world. Give me a good old small town that is erupting in demons or God forbid zombies and some strong folk to fight them. Leave the Pres of the US in the white house. Too many people know him anyway.


message 24: by Christopher (new)

Christopher Kellen (ChristopherKellen) | 48 comments Mod
Melissa wrote: "Christopher, that if you started with Chapter 5 (I think) where the Trollocs overrun the town, you'd be entering the story at a good point and miss all the chapters of nothing happening. The story is worth reading - I think at least through Book 10. "

I appreciate the thought, Melissa. Unfortunately, I don't have much time for reading these days, and I'd rather spend my energy on promising indie works, rather than spending a bunch of cash and time on books that plenty of people already like. I've read enough fantasy to have already read every element of the Wheel of Time somewhere else.

Thanks for the recommendation. I appreciate your defense of it, just as I appreciated Michael's defense of The Name of the Wind when I met him in San Jose. Still couldn't get through that one either, despite my best efforts. It's one of those things... I understand that other people like these books; they're just not for me.


message 25: by Robert (new)

Robert Eaton (heroalwayswins) | 19 comments I love Wheel of Time, but I too am starting to shy away from the insanely long, overly descriptive fantasy books. I can read three or four great books in the time it takes to finish one of those Robert Jordan books, and many of them are every bit as enjoyable. Honestly, I’ve often thought that Jordan and many of my other favorite fantasy writers should have left a lot of the page count on the chopping block.


message 26: by S.J. (new)

S.J. Faerlind (sjfaerlind) | 4 comments I really enjoyed Wheel of Time but I have to agree with Robert that the story could have been moved along much faster in places. I can't remember which book it was, but there was one in the second half in the series in which absolutely NOTHING happened. After waiting a year for it to come out, it was a huge disappointment to me, especially since the previous book had left readers with a suspenseful, cliffhanger ending! It picked up again significantly after that so I'll definitely finish the series. I tend to like "wordy" and descriptive fantasy - as long as the description adds something to the reading experience anyway.


message 27: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McPhail (melissagmcphail) | 10 comments You're all quite right about WOT. If only we could end at book 7, everyone would've been happier. The series lost its integrity after we left Matt buried under a wall.

I love Christopher's point of focusing on indie books. Those I've read so far veer from the mainstream, and it's a refreshing look at the genre.


message 28: by Eric (new)

Eric Diehl (oediehl) | 4 comments One issue that seems to recur in many fantasy novels, to my eye, is repetition. I had a hard time hooking up with JRR Tolkien (especially Silmarillion, which I had to set aside), because it seemed that Tolkien would describe one incident or issue in great detail, then he'd go back and come at the same thing from a different angle, and, then, you guessed it---he'd make yet another pass. I'm currently struggling to finish Sanderson's Mistborn trilogy, and while it is a well developed story line, it didn't take too long before I was hearing way too much detail about how an allomancer would burn metals to perform this or that feat. And one of the things that made me set aside Robert Jordan somewhere in the 3rd book was the extremely irritating character trait of the female (forgotten her name) who seemed to endlessly twirl her hair with one finger.


message 29: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Marvello (drmarvello) | 11 comments Robert wrote: "I love Wheel of Time, but I too am starting to shy away from the insanely long, overly descriptive fantasy books. I can read three or four great books in the time it takes to finish one of those R..."

I gave up on WOT somewhere on Book 10, which was originally supposed to be the last of the series. After too many overly-long installments that felt like they were going in circles, I just gave up. I haven't finished the series to this day. Since then, I've been a little wary of giant fantasy tomes that are part of an unfinished series. I have not started Game of Thrones, and have no intention of doing so until/unless the series is completed (if then).

I have never been much of a short story reader, but I'm enjoying the many shorter-than-novel-length self-published works I've been encountering lately. I read mostly self-published books these days and I love how the Kindle shows you those little dots that give you a sense of how long the book is. I can choose to start something long or short, depending upon my mood.

The variety of works that self publishing has made available is one of the coolest things about the movement, IMO.


message 30: by Kate (new)

Kate Krake (katekrake) Most of my fantasy peeves now oddly started as things I really used to like - and they're essentially the same over used things that people have mentioned above: the no one kid becomes the king (or queen), elves, vampires, and direct JRRT rip offs. Actually I tend to avoid most epic and urban fantasy these days for these very reasons.

I never thought there'd be a time where I'd be bored of vampires! Even when something is new and interesting and well written, I'm just over it. My 12 year old self is currently weeping....

And the same goes for fantasy movies too.


message 31: by Eric (new)

Eric (erchristensen) | 3 comments I had an article on Fantasy-Faction.com about this topic: 10 fantasy cliches that should be put to rest (http://fantasy-faction.com/2012/ten-f...).

It seemed to spark a good discussion over there; I hope it helps the discussion here.


message 32: by D.W. (new)

D.W. Hawkins (dwhawkins) | 6 comments As far as the WOT goes, I struggled through books 9-11 as well (I think I've got the numbers right on that one lol) and got really fed up with reading about EVERYONE but the main three characters that made me love the series. On a good note, though, Sanderson has done a pretty good job getting the story back on track, I think, and I've enjoyed the two that have been published under his care.

I'm one of those people that has a hard time putting a story down when I start it, even if I'm incredibly frustrated with it. Even if it's horrible, I have to finish.

I thought of another one that we haven't mentioned, and so here goes. I hate it when the main character is an almost god-like figure of pure, shining good that just can't be beaten at anything. The Sword of Truth series was bad about this...Richard was just awesome at everything. I got really irritated with it. I've read stories where the main character is always the underdog and wins out through a combination of luck and ingenuity that were much better, in my opinion. Still, I had to finish it lol.


message 33: by D.W. (new)

D.W. Hawkins (dwhawkins) | 6 comments Eric wrote: "I had an article on Fantasy-Faction.com about this topic: 10 fantasy cliches that should be put to rest (http://fantasy-faction.com/2012/ten-f...).

It seemed to spark a good discussion..."


Great article!


message 34: by Eric (new)

Eric (erchristensen) | 3 comments Thanks. I'm glad you liked it.

RE: WOT. I think Jordan needed an editor who wasn't his wife. The story started off solidly, but past book 4, things started to slide. Past book 6, and I wondered if he was getting paid by the word. Sanderson does seem to have rescued the series a bit.

But yes, I read every stinking book, because I've been reading it since 1992, and I must finish, like a good little nerdy fantasy fan. Both one of the more rewarding and frustrating series I've read.


message 35: by Melissa (new)

Melissa McPhail (melissagmcphail) | 10 comments Eric wrote: "RE: WOT...But yes, I read every stinking book, because I've been reading it since 1992, and I must finish, like a good little nerdy fantasy fan. Both one of the more rewarding and frustrating series I've read. "

Nicely put, Eric. :)


message 36: by Will (new)

Will Macmillan Jones (willmacmillanjones) | 16 comments I managed to put WOT down years ago, at book 3, and have resisted any temptation to pick it up again.

I've recently read Robin Hobb's Liveship Traders trilogy, and came to the conclusion that there were two decent books in there, padded out. A lot.

So one cliche for me is: padding


message 37: by Elizabeth (new)

Elizabeth Ellen | 1 comments Oh, so many peeves, so little time...
I'll settle on "logic problems".

I start to tune out when supposedly fighter-raised adolescent protagonists are as philosophical and linguistically astute as forty-year-old scholars, illiterate villagers line themselves up in alphabetical order, or a hero riding a horse travels hundreds of miles in a single day.

I'm prepared to suspend some credulity, but the fighter(or lover)-who-never-tires and performs the impossible chapter after chapter kicks me straight out of any book (unless it's a spoof). Boring.


message 38: by Pete (last edited Jul 18, 2012 04:36PM) (new)

Pete (pf_garcia) | 3 comments I don´t like omnipresent characters all that much. I feel they steal too much of the story and of the development of the characters. I feel, as a reader, that I am being steered, instead of allowing me to discover the world on my own.


message 39: by Traci (new)

Traci Loudin (traciloudin) Beyond what's been said, I hate when the heroes defeat the bad guy with a different type of magic that we haven't seen in the book or series previously. Just comes out of no where and makes you wonder why they didn't just do that to begin with.


message 40: by Voss (new)

Voss Foster (vossfoster) | 6 comments There's not a lot in fantasy that really bothers me. Just one big thing, really: when it was all a dream. Or, you know, something like that. If everything is undone by the end of the book, or it really was all a dream (God forbid). It can, and has, ruined books for me.


message 41: by Steelwhisper (new)

Steelwhisper What I dislike are appropriations of real geography and history without an excellent insight into the background of these countries.

Either do some real worldbuilding or do your research properly. There's really no excuse for being lazy.


message 42: by Mia (new)

Mia R. | 5 comments I agree with @Will - Padding!

WoT killed me around book 6 and has gotten me to the point where if the story isn't moving I just stop.

Which is why I like Patrick Rothfuss. I haven't gotten tired of reading those yet.

My second place peeve would be the overdone cliche's. Though, as others have mentioned, Eddings seems to be the exception. I can re-read his stuff any time.


message 43: by John (new)

John LeViness (jlawrence) | 2 comments For me, I can't stand the same old villian. He's evil, always has been, always will be. Maybe I am a little twisted but I want to know what makes people tick. At least give me a hint.


message 44: by Cynthia (new)

Cynthia Joyce | 4 comments Someone who loves Indie books! Yeah! I have a question for you, if a fantasy series were complete, would you prefer 8 books of say 50,000 words or 4 of 100,000 words? (Assuming the books aren't not all endless description but have stuff Happening in them.)


message 45: by Janine (new)

Janine Southard (jani_s) | 1 comments To add a new pet peeve:
Any time something requires "destiny" as a motivator. Destined royalty, destined heroes, destined foes.

I could see a lovely parody where someone had a destined breakfast on the 23rd of March (pancakes with lemon curd, but they don't feel like lemon curd that morning and rail against the injustice of it all, but end up eating the pancakes and being happy with them anyway).


message 46: by Billy (new)

Billy Wong | 16 comments The 'token female warrior who's only there to be hot and is clearly secondary to the hero' is pretty annoying, although I think that might be more common in fantasy movies as opposed to books, maybe.

Also yeah prophecies and 'fate' although I do include them in my books, it's usually for the heroes to defy and break them.


message 47: by Angela (new)

Angela (smwelles) | 22 comments M. wrote: "So, I slept on it. I agree with everything above but the thing that REALLY Ticks me off...

Elves.

I see elves in the product description and I usually groan, long and loud, and I don't read anyt..."


That made me laugh aloud reading that. Love your peeve!


message 48: by Angela (new)

Angela (smwelles) | 22 comments Jaq wrote: "Robert wrote: "What's your biggest peeve when it comes to fantasy books?
..."

Going into the Fantasy section and finding it littered with Romance books."


haha!


message 49: by Angela (new)

Angela (smwelles) | 22 comments I think my biggest peeve is a book being a Tolkien or Harry Potter knockoff. I walked through Barnes & Noble and saw a book called "Shades of Gray." Gee, wonder what book they're trying to piggyback off of >.>


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