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Victorian Costume Dramas > Favorite costume dramas?

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message 1: by Inder (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:11PM) (new)

Inder | 27 comments What is your favorite movie version of a Victorian novel?

I love Masterpiece Theater's "Bleak House."


message 2: by Laura (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:12PM) (new)

Laura The Importance of Being Earnest with Rupert Everett. An Ideal Husband is a close second; in fact, this is the only movie where I prefer the cinematic ending to the literary one!


message 3: by Darcy (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:12PM) (new)

Darcy | 234 comments I'm a sucker for the BBC version of "Our Mutual Friend."

I know Austen's Regency and not Victorian, but did anyone see Bride and Prejudice?


message 4: by Inder (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:13PM) (new)

Inder | 27 comments Oooh, there have been some really fun modern remakes of Austen novels - I loved "Clueless." "Bride and Prejudice" was super silly, but I thought it was great fun. Sadly, the critics did not agree.


message 5: by Inder (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:13PM) (new)

Inder | 27 comments After watching "Bleak House," I've been considering naming a daughter "Esther." But I should probably read the book first, right? Talk me down, people.


message 6: by [deleted user] (new)

My favourite drama is the BBC adaptation of Gaskell's North & South. Absolutely love it!
next would be BBC Pride & Prejudice, Bleak House and Emma Thompson's Sense & Sensibility.


message 7: by Darcy (last edited Aug 25, 2016 02:15PM) (new)

Darcy | 234 comments Yeah, I love the BBC Pride and Prejudice--the casting was so well done for that film. Persuasion was also good. I'll have to check out the North & South adaptation--such a wonderful novel!


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

I forgot to add the tv movies done of Catherine Cookson's novels. I know CC wasn't born in the Victorian era, but her books are excellent. The movies are enjoyable and I have many of them. The Dwelling Place is a favourite as well as Fifteen Streets, The Black Candle.


message 9: by Cynthia (last edited Sep 01, 2008 11:31AM) (new)

Cynthia All the jane austen movies are so wonderful.
For Trollope fans, I was glad to see Sarah included The Way We Live Now on her list, it's especially good, with the wonderful Cilliam Murphy and the astounding David Suchet.
Have any of you seen the old black and white pride and prejudice with Green Garson and Laurence Olivier? It's not completely true to the plot of the novel but it's wonderful; I alternate between obsessively watching this version and the Colin Firth version.


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Mmmmm, Masterpiece Theatre (2006) version of Jane Eyre with Toby Stephens and Francesca Annis. My eyes water just thinking about it. Also the BBC miniseries of Cranford with Judy Dench. Yummy stuff.


message 11: by Jenna (new)

Jenna | 19 comments I love The Pallisers (1972-1974) all 26 hours of it. Great costumes. and love Susan Hampshire, too.

I like Daniel Deronda too --Jodhi May was wonderful.




message 12: by Susan (new)

Susan (boswellbaxter) | 12 comments I loved the recent BBC adaptation of "Our Mutual Friend." The 1970's adaptation is now available on DVD in the UK--I ordered it and liked it, though I think on the whole I preferred the newer adaptation.


message 13: by The Book Whisperer (aka Boof) (last edited Mar 26, 2009 10:37AM) (new)

The Book Whisperer (aka Boof) | 868 comments My favourite is Jane Eyre with Ruth Wilson and Toby Stephens (swoon!) - but then it's my favourite book too.

I also recently watched Tess of the D'Urbivilles and thought that was wonderful too.

Other favourites are Bleak House, Oliver (the old one from about 30 years ago), Northanger Abbey and Pride and Prejudice .


message 14: by [deleted user] (new)

OMG, I'm with you on Toby Stephens! Monkey pile!


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (SusannaG) | 629 comments Inder - You should definitely read Bleak House! Fabulous book.


message 16: by Sherien (new)

Sherien toby stephens plays well as mr. rochester!


The Book Whisperer (aka Boof) | 868 comments He certainly does ;o) Yum!


message 18: by Ayu (new)

Ayu Palar (atchoo) | 31 comments I love Sense and Sensibility (if Austen belongs to the Victorians).

I also adore the BBC version of Great Expectations with Ioan Gruffud as Pip.


message 19: by Susan (new)

Susan (boswellbaxter) | 12 comments Anyone seen the new Little Dorrit miniseries? I was tempted, but I had so much else to do when it started in my part of the US this weekend that I decided to wait for the DVD.


message 20: by Darcy (new)

Darcy | 234 comments Thanks for recommending the BBC's North and South, Anne! I just watched it and loved it.


message 21: by Cathy (new)

Cathy | 38 comments Sherien wrote: "toby stephens plays well as mr. rochester!"

I loved this version - it was a bit more hot-blooded than i remembered the book being, so I went back to it and yes it is all there in the text - very passionate!


message 22: by Gabriele (last edited Apr 16, 2009 02:12PM) (new)

Gabriele Wills (Muskoka) | 129 comments I loved Far From the Madding Crowd with Julie Christie, made way back in 1969, I think. It was what got me over my school-induced dislike of Hardy. I re-read the book afterwards, and then everything else Hardy wrote. In addition, I like pretty well every costume drama that comes from Britain!!! It became a ritual at our house to watch Masterpiece Theatre on Sunday evenings. I now have the entire Upstairs Downstairs DVD collection. : )


message 23: by [deleted user] (new)

Oh hey, I was just thinking of renting that series from netflix. The hardest part is waiting to see the movies until after I've read the books.


message 24: by Bettie☯ (new)

Bettie☯ Gabriele wrote: "I loved Far From the Madding Crowd with Julie Christie, made way back in 1969, I think. It was what got me over my school-induced dislike of Hardy. I re-read the book afterwards, and then everythi..."

Then try The Duchess of Duke Street :O)


message 25: by Gabriele (new)

Gabriele Wills (Muskoka) | 129 comments Saw every one of those as well. I have characters who party at her hotel during the war. : ) the real "Duchess" was Rosa Lewis, who was known to provide approved officers with a nice clean tart.


message 26: by Bettie☯ (new)

Bettie☯ BBC Forsyte saga?


message 27: by Bettie☯ (new)

Bettie☯ Darcy wrote: "I'm a sucker for the BBC version of "Our Mutual Friend."

I know Austen's Regency and not Victorian, but did anyone see Bride and Prejudice? "


yep!


message 28: by Bettie☯ (new)

Bettie☯ I want to know if anyone watched 'Brass'


message 29: by Gabriele (new)

Gabriele Wills (Muskoka) | 129 comments Bettie (Goodreads Reader!) wrote: "BBC Forsyte saga?"

Loved that and the Pallisers and numerous others. I wish that PBS would bring some of those BBC dramas back as I missed some and love to see my favourites again. It's pretty well the only TV I watch.


message 30: by Bettie☯ (new)

Bettie☯ Gabriele wrote: "Bettie (Goodreads Reader!) wrote: "BBC Forsyte saga?"

Loved that and the Pallisers and numerous others. I wish that PBS would bring some of those BBC dramas back as I missed some and love to see m..."


did you get I claudius?



message 31: by Bettie☯ (new)

Bettie☯ and did you get The Water Margin?



message 32: by Gabriele (new)

Gabriele Wills (Muskoka) | 129 comments Bettie (Goodreads Reader!) wrote: "Gabriele wrote: "Bettie (Goodreads Reader!) wrote: "BBC Forsyte saga?"

Loved that and the Pallisers and numerous others. I wish that PBS would bring some of those BBC dramas back as I missed som..."


Yes, I saw it years ago.


message 33: by Gabriele (new)

Gabriele Wills (Muskoka) | 129 comments Although not based on a Victorian novel, but set in that era was the Poldark series, which was great fun.


message 34: by Bettie☯ (new)

Bettie☯ Gabriele wrote: "Although not based on a Victorian novel, but set in that era was the Poldark series, which was great fun. "

yessssss

that is why I am re-reading xxxxxxx


message 35: by Bettie☯ (new)

Bettie☯ Gabrielle - do you remember Brass?



message 36: by Gabriele (new)

Gabriele Wills (Muskoka) | 129 comments No. Give me some info to jog the old brain, Bettie. (I'm going back and forth between making dinner and staying online! lol)


message 37: by Gabriele (new)

Gabriele Wills (Muskoka) | 129 comments Bettie (Goodreads Reader!) wrote: "and did you get The Water Margin?
"


No! What was that about?


message 38: by Bettie☯ (new)

Bettie☯ Gabriele wrote: "No. Give me some info to jog the old brain, Bettie. (I'm going back and forth between making dinner and staying online! lol)"

You know in real life Prunella Scales is married to fellow actor Tinothy West well he did done do (snerky laff) a series called Brass that I did love so very very much. He was the top nob of an industrial town so he looked down on everyone else (envisage Manchester here). It was Victorian/Prince of Wales'sie/Early Late George pomposity at it's very very best


message 39: by [deleted user] (new)

Does Pallisers get better after the 1st episode? I almost fell asleep half way through it- hoity toityness. The only Victorian series I really LOVED was Bramwell. I wish they would make Dr.Bramwell action figures so I could play with them. "Dr.Bramwell vs. G.I.Joe in high-action adventure". (The doctor is a woman, by the way). Dr. Bramwell amputates Joe's leg with a hack saw! Really, the series is wonderfully done, amputations and all. The Duchess of Dukestreet was so-so for me; it had kind of a stagnant feel to it, the way a lot of older British shows do for some reason. Now I'm watching Berkeley Square, which is pretty good- the relationship of three nannies who meet in the park every day and endure their respective families.


message 40: by Bettie☯ (new)

Bettie☯ Oooooh hoooo - you meant details about the Water Margin?? Please don't be angry with me because it is time for you to cook - all our clocks are different here on GR.

ancient text comes to life - the root of all the sillies such as 'monkey' et al.

http://www.china-on-site.com/water.php


message 41: by Bettie☯ (new)

Bettie☯ Cher wrote: "Does Pallisers get better after the 1st episode? I almost fell asleep half way through it- hoity toityness. The only Victorian series I really LOVED was Bramwell. I wish they would make Dr.Bramwel..."

I did not like The Pallisers - nope and nosiree and don't think for one moment I didn't read and then watch because I did put myself through it all in every which way.

hee

I sometimes wonder why 'they' didn't put on the lovely Anthony Powell stuff instead; surely A Dance to the Music of Time First Movement would have been so much more congenial


message 42: by Gabriele (new)

Gabriele Wills (Muskoka) | 129 comments Cher wrote: "Does Pallisers get better after the 1st episode? I almost fell asleep half way through it- hoity toityness. The only Victorian series I really LOVED was Bramwell. I wish they would make Dr.Bramwel..."

I saw the Pallisers when it first came out - what, 35 years ago? Maybe you had be there : ) to appreciate it. I think I'd still like it as well, but who's to say how our tastes change. At that time, anything like that was relished because it wasn't mainstream and therefore not easily available. Try a few more episodes and see if you can connect with Lady Glencora etc.




message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

Getting back to the discussion...I wish my TV would channel the BBC. I had PBS in Maryland and sometimes they used to play a lot of Austen/Dickens classics that came from BBC...but for some reason there's no PBS in the Southeast. I have about 7-8 HBOs, Cinemaxs, and Showtime channels so I get all the channels. But no more PBS. Must be a thing here.


message 44: by Gabriele (new)

Gabriele Wills (Muskoka) | 129 comments I'm sure there must be a very BIG misunderstanding. I do enjoy this group and look forward to more neat conversations!


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (SusannaG) | 629 comments I get two PBS stations here in SC (our local SCTV affiliate and UNC-TV from up in NC). My father gets four - he lives in Charlotte and gets the SC station from Rock Hill, UNC-TV, the local NC station, and a local independent PBS station. Rich pickings!

We also get BBC-America, which is a great channel.


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

Must be my local provider then...I am in a small town. Looks like Charlotte is where I want to be haha.


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (SusannaG) | 629 comments The town has no soul anymore, and it has perfectly ridiculous traffic these days, but it does have lots of PBS choices!


Captain Sir Roddy, R.N. (Ret.) (captain_sir_roddy) Regarding recent film adaptations of Victorian novels I've read, I've a few faves:

"Wives and Daughters" (BBC, 1999)
"Little Dorrit" (BBC, 2008)
"Bleak House" (BBC, 2005)
"The Tenant of Wildfell Hall" (BBC, 1996)
"Our Mutual Friend" (BBC, 1998)

"Wives and Daughters" and "Little Dorrit" are just about my two most favorite adaptations/movies ever. I could watch 'em anytime, anywhere!

As a side-note, the first three in my list are screenplays written by Andrew Davies. This fellow can bring a novel to life! He has done several of the recent Jane Austen adaptations, and I believe has written the screenplay for the new "Emma" being filmed, as we speak, for release this fall in the UK. Cheers! Chris


message 49: by Sara (last edited Jan 22, 2010 04:32PM) (new)

Sara Lou (SarahLou) My favourite costume dramas : definitely the BBC's Pride and Prejudice, just love it, Alison Steadman as Mrs Bennet is hilarious. And of course like most people I fell for Colin Firth's 'Mr Darcy' and he remained in my top five list of 'favourite period drama male leads' (yes I have long titled lists of ridiculous natures just because) until the BBC's North and South. Then I fell in love with Richard Armitage AND his Mr John Thornton. Then I read North and South and fell even more in love with Mr Thornton (yes I know he isn't a REAL person!).

The BBC really are pro's at choosing gorgeous, charming, interesting males to play the leading roles in their period dramas. I can never decide whether I prefer Toby Stephens as Markham in Tenant of Wildfell Hall (another favourite) or Mr Rochester in Jane Eyre. (he was hilarious as Prince John in Robin Hood but that's by the by). Of all adaptations of books I've never really loved any of Jane Eyre, it was one of the first novels I ever read and I don't think anyone's ever been able to capture the magic I felt when I first read it. Ruth Wilson did a very good job as Jane Eyre in the BBC adaptation though.

I'll also give a shout out to the recent adaptation of Wuthering Heights (ITV), but that's again merely superficial because I loved Tom Hardy's Heathcliff, however the story itself was a complete botch job and I prefer the book wholeheartedly.

I usually have the opinion that the BBC do the best job of period dramas, it's the only time I feel rewarded for paying the licence fee!

p.s - shout out for Lark Rise because it's amazing!


message 50: by Paula (new)

Paula | 1088 comments I have to be honest, but what sells it for me is the accent. I know this must sounds really odd to those of you in England/UK because you HAVE those accents (do you still call it an accent when it's your real, natural voice?), but for an American girl like me, tall, handsome, with the accent... you have to be a pretty bad actor for me to not like you.


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