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Fun and Games > Words that go Bonk!

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message 1: by Mikki (new)

Mikki (aussietwins99) Ok! I just read an article in the SMH about Brits goining bonkers over an Aussie Ad! Got me thinking I know several meanings of the word Bonk, Bonkers, Bonking? Wonder if the word means the same to Aussies as it does to other Anglos?
Im in need of light entertainment here, anyone got some literary suggestions!


message 2: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10087 comments Mod
wow, this is SOOOOO not where this thread belongs. I am relocating it.

Are you suggesting we give you the definiton of the word bonk? or are you asking for other silly words that can be taken seriously or freudianly?

hmmmm????


message 3: by Anne (new)

Anne | 624 comments I wish we Americans had a word like 'chuffed'. It sounds like it feels!

I've taken on a few britishisms, like lovely, fannying about / faffing about, don't be a wally / a numpty, cheers, knackered, rubbish, have 'a' coffee (not 'some'), biscuits, tuck in, take away, starkers, scrummy, it's gone pear-shaped, fairy lights.....and bugger is my favorite swear word.


message 4: by Rowena (new)

Rowena (rowenacherry) | 52 comments "Keep your pecker up" is another Britishism which is misunderstood in the USA.

A British gentleman's pecker is his chin, and ladies have peckers, too....unlike most of us in America.


message 5: by Hayes (last edited Jan 11, 2009 05:59AM) (new)

Hayes (hayes13) How about "a bomb"? In the US a bomb is a disaster. It's something great in the UK, right?

But I took the original mail to mean just refs to Bonk, Bonkers, etc.

To go bonkers in the US means to go crazy, either insane or angry. Dog in World acording to garp was named bonkers, wasn't it?


Petra hugged a guy who got Covid next day. Oh dear (petra-x) No one in the UK wears panties, maybe very little girlies, but everyone else wears knickers or pants. Men wear briefs, not a brief which is something a solicitor has. Come to think of it a solicitor in the States is a bit of a ho I think, in the UK they are lawyers, maybe that's the same thing. Pants and vests in the UK are worn underneath your trousers and shirt, but in the US they are outerwear. I wonder how all these words changed their meanings?


message 7: by Kandice (new)

Kandice Isn't a fag a cigarette in the UK? It IS NOT in America.


message 8: by Dionisia (new)

Dionisia (therabidreader) | 332 comments I live in the eastern side of the US and never been outside the mainland.

The words "bangs" and "banging" have to separate meanings. We say "bangs" to refer to the shorter hair that covers your forehead, in the way that annoys Fiona. "Banging" means having sex.

Americans use the word "blunt" to refer to weed. (or in more general use to mean being straightforward/cutting the crap.

Even within the US, there are slight differences in terminology depending on what region of the country your in.

I'm from the south, where sex is sometimes referred to using the base word cut.

"Cut some" = have sex or "cutty buddy" = friends with benefits

When I moved up north to PA, the folks around here had no idea what I was talking about.


Allison (The Allure of Books) (inconceivably) I sure wouldn't walk into an airport talking about something "costing a bomb."

I have only heard blunt referred to as weed or someone tactless.


message 10: by Kandice (new)

Kandice I've never heard sex referred to as "cut". That's funny.

Yes, Fiona, saying you were taking a quick fag break would be very...not good, I would think! LOL


message 11: by Elizabeth (Alaska) (last edited Apr 15, 2009 11:43AM) (new)

Elizabeth (Alaska) Slang words vary throughout the US and the rest of the English speaking world.

I was always amused by the British expression "I'll knock you up in the morning". US girls would definitely not like getting knocked up - in the morning or any other time.


message 12: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) I had the same reaction to that expression! and fell about laughing the first time one of my English colleagues asked if he could borrow my rubber. (Eraser in North America).


Elizabeth (Alaska) Yep, our rubbers should definitely not be borrowed. Freely given away, maybe, but don't give it back after you've used it. Gross!


message 14: by Sara ♥ (new)

Sara ♥ (saranicole) OH MY GOSH... I about died laughing! Rubber... Geez!


Susanna - Censored by GoodReads (susannag) | 1736 comments The only lawyers here in the US that I've heard referred to as "solicitors" are the County Solicitors here in South Carolina. (They have the same job as the District Attorneys in other states, just under another name.)

"Bangs" are a part of your hair. Though I really like a period term for them, from when they were first massively popular: "lunatic fringe."


Elizabeth (Alaska) "Snogging" came up in another thread, which, to me, has a different connotation than the one used by Brits. Upon further review, it might be something more like "swapping spit" of a couple of generations ago. (Still gross, but perhaps not quite as gross as I'd assumed.)


Allison (The Allure of Books) (inconceivably) Elizabeth (Alaska) wrote: ""Snogging" came up in another thread, which, to me, has a different connotation than the one used by Brits. Upon further review, it might be something more like "swapping spit" of a couple of gener..."

kissing is gross?


Elizabeth (Alaska) No, kissing isn't gross - neither is what I'd thought it was, actually I kind of like it. Swapping spit is gross if you think about it.


message 19: by Allison (The Allure of Books) (last edited Apr 15, 2009 01:42PM) (new)

Allison (The Allure of Books) (inconceivably) I just always thought of "snogging" as the British word for kissing...doesn't really have a separate American meaning that I'm aware of.


Elizabeth (Alaska) From my reading today, snogging is a lot more than kissing, but certainly kissing is part of it.


message 21: by Allison (The Allure of Books) (last edited Apr 15, 2009 01:50PM) (new)

Allison (The Allure of Books) (inconceivably) *shrugs* I am just going off what I have read, and I checked the dictionary before I posted, but I suppose authors can use all the artistic license they want to bend the definition, so its all good :)


message 22: by Elizabeth (Alaska) (last edited Apr 15, 2009 01:56PM) (new)

Elizabeth (Alaska) I looked at the urban dictionary, as well as the thefreedictionary.com which includes: caressing, cuddling, fondling, kissing, petting, snuggling, necking, and foreplay which does not include the genitals.

I don't recall bashing people who do it, Fiona, I have children.


Allison (The Allure of Books) (inconceivably) can't anybody update urban dictionary as long as you have a log in to the site? Wouldn't trust it much :P I'm surprised Elizabeth uses it!


Allison (The Allure of Books) (inconceivably) ...but in the end, who cares! Its just a word.


Elizabeth (Alaska) I googled the word, and looked at the first 2 hits. I guess I'm outta here.


message 26: by Allison (The Allure of Books) (last edited Apr 15, 2009 02:37PM) (new)

Allison (The Allure of Books) (inconceivably) Elizabeth (Alaska) wrote: "I googled the word, and looked at the first 2 hits. I guess I'm outta here."

well I have no doubt believing the particular book you are reading referred to snogging as something further...


Elizabeth (Alaska) We were talking here about words and their different meanings in different cultures. I have said that I thought snogging was something different than kissing. I was wrong, said so, and then likened it to the US term "swapping spit", which term I find gross. Since I have seen that swapping spit as a stream of liquid between 2 individuals . . .

Allison, I don't recall criticizing anyone in particular in this topic, and I'm not sure why you have turned this discussion personal.


Allison (The Allure of Books) (inconceivably) erm...its not personal? I never said you criticized anyone Elizabeth! I just tried to tell you in my above post that I'm sure what you read really did lead you to believe snogging was something more then kissing because I didn't want to sound mean!


Elizabeth (Alaska) Actually, it's the adjectives "full frontal" that made me think snogging might be something other than kissing. It's really hard to kiss without the full frontal part. At least the last time I looked, most people's mouths are at the front. ;)


message 30: by Sara ♥ (last edited Apr 15, 2009 03:09PM) (new)

Sara ♥ (saranicole) Yeah, Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging: Confessions of Georgia Nicolson was a funny book. I don't think I've ever read a YA book with a more immature main character. (Notice my lack of the word "heroine.")

Here is Georgia's Snogging Scale:

0.5 sticky eyes (Be careful using this. I’ve still got some complete twit following me around like a seeing-eye dog.)
1 holding hands
2 arm around
3 goodnight kiss
4 kiss lasting over three minutes without a breath
4.5 hand snogging
5 open mouth kissing
6 tongues
6.5 ear snogging
6.75 neck nuzzling
7 upper body fondling – outdoors
8 upper body fondling – indoors (in bed)
Virtual number 8 When your upper body is not actually being fondled in reality, but you know that it is in your snoggees head.
9 below waist activity (or bwa)
10 the full monty

So in the specific case of those books, that's what the main character considers the levels of snogging.


message 31: by Sara ♥ (new)

Sara ♥ (saranicole) Agreed. I love that she has "hand snogging" in there. Hahaha... I've done a lot of that in my time... haha...


message 32: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10087 comments Mod
oh boy...
Seems we were getting a wee bit touchy in here earlier.

Here's a great rule of thumb to posting:
"You" statements make things personal.

"...don't mean you have to bash it and others who do."
"I'm not sure why you have turned this discussion personal."

These point fingers and can cause anomosity amongst members. Choose your words carefully, refrain from posting comments that contain strong "You" statements, and we should all be able to live happily ever after.

Another rule of thumb:
By replying to someone who finger points, we can potentially enflame the situation, putting both posters in the wrong. You know the saying "Two wrongs dont make a right"....

Thats all my motherly advice for now :)




Elizabeth (Alaska) "Down the gurgler" is a phrase I saw from an Aussie recently. Because of context, I understood it, but a "gurgler" isn't a term I'm aware of here in the US.


message 34: by Lori, Super Mod (new)

Lori (tnbbc) | 10087 comments Mod
btw, I'm not trying to finger point, or call anyone out. Just raising the awareness flag, thats all.


message 35: by Sara ♥ (new)

Sara ♥ (saranicole) *tries to figure out what a gurgler could be*

I'm thinking either a drain (as in a sink), or a throat (as in the neck area). What does it mean?


message 36: by Elizabeth (Alaska) (last edited Apr 15, 2009 05:20PM) (new)

Elizabeth (Alaska) From context, I would place it more like toilet (but then that might be the US reference), so your guess of drain is excellent. It was in reference to the person's numerical rating at a game site: "My high was 1607, but I'm down the gurgler now." with her rating something less than 1500. Not that the numbers mean anything here, I'm just giving them to place them in context.




message 37: by Jon (new)

Jon Mikki wrote: "Ok! I just read an article in the SMH about Brits goining bonkers over an Aussie Ad! Got me thinking I know several meanings of the word Bonk, Bonkers, Bonking? Wonder if the word means the same to..."

i can vouch for aussies and id say to bonk means the same here as in UK, but in the UK we might say thats bonkers meaning its mad but ive not heard that in Oz


message 38: by Jon (new)

Jon in Australia - to Root someone is the same as to Bonk someone

and they say pash instead of snog


message 39: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) never heard that one... where's it from, do you know Jon?


message 40: by Jon (new)

Jon Hayes wrote: "never heard that one... where's it from, do you know Jon?"

root or pash? lol actually i dont really know the answer to either come to think of it. to have a good pash sort of works just as well as to have a snog


message 41: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) I meant pash, but root too. I worked as an ESL teacher for 20 years and most of my colleagues were from the UK, Ireland and Australia, so it surprised me that I had never heard the expressions. Snog was new to me 20 years ago, but became almost normal to me (although I would never use the word, nor can I use - off topic sorry - the word biscuit to mean cookie).


message 42: by Jon (new)

Jon Hayes wrote: "I meant pash, but root too. I worked as an ESL teacher for 20 years and most of my colleagues were from the UK, Ireland and Australia, so it surprised me that I had never heard the expressions. Sno..."

ind im the opposite, i can never use cookie, lol. ive been in australia 9 years originally from UK and somethings ive absorbed and others i cant, like saying Doona for quilt/duvet or lollies for sweets (candy)


message 43: by yellowbird (last edited Apr 19, 2009 06:52PM) (new)

yellowbird | 55 comments in America chip refers to potato chip, the kind that come in a bag, not french fry, like in Britain. I'm not sure what they call potato chips...crisps, maybe?

Also over here 'wanker' is another name for a male appendage, is it the same elsewhere?

And what exactly does the phrase 'pull the other one, it has bells on' mean?! My fertile imagination has probably led me to a false conclusion there.


message 44: by Marsha (new)

Marsha (earthmarsha) I'm American, and I believe that a wanker is someone who is DOING something with his male appendage, not the appendage itself. See the verb "to wank."

I believe that 'pull the other one, it has bells on' refers to one's leg, as in "are you pulling my leg?" If I'm wrong, please correct me!


message 45: by Kim Marie (new)

Kim Marie | 262 comments As an Aussie the expressions I hear the most, other than the ones already mentioned, are "having it off",
"a naughty" and "nookie" which I gather may be derived from the Dutch "du neuken". As an aside, the word "thongs" has created some confusion because we wear them on our feet (not "flip flops") and "G-strings" on our bums (now we just have to be more careful in conversation about thongs, lol).


message 46: by Kandice (new)

Kandice I live in Southern California, and we wear thongs on our feet and our butts. Another word for flip-flops/thongs, is zorris.

There is a difference between thongs and g-strings here. Thongs are thicker in the back part. G-strings are, litterally, strings, back there.


Petra hugged a guy who got Covid next day. Oh dear (petra-x) It means you don't believe a word of what someone is saying. It has something to do with the male appendage below the waist (but women have them too) - the leg. If you say, are you pulling my leg? You are asking if someone is joking.

Here's one from the UK that I don't think many Americans would understand: brass monkey weather.


message 48: by Marsha (new)

Marsha (earthmarsha) Ah, that would refer to another appendage, wouldn't it? Cold weather and cold appendages.


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