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Archived Group Reads 2012 > In Memoriam Part 3 - XXVIII-CIII (78-103) - to the third Christmas

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message 1: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2531 comments Sorry, I'm a few days late posting this part, but I suspect that most readers are behind, as I am. I'm wondering whether the moderators would extend the time frame for InMem, or whether we should stick with the current schedule and finish up by the end of June.

I'm not ready to post on this section yet, but if anybody else is, please go ahead!

BTW, I'll be traveling on June 18th, so may be a day or two late in posting Part 4, too.


message 2: by SarahC (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1424 comments I am trying to catch up, but it is not something I find I can do quickly with Tennyson. I am only into the second discussion section. I am the slowest reader Victorians group ever saw anyway!

Since this is a Buddy Read, and obviously a smaller group (all who are reading, please join in on comments), I see no reason why we should not extend into July as needed.


message 3: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2531 comments SarahC wrote: "I am trying to catch up, but it is not something I find I can do quickly with Tennyson. I am only into the second discussion section. I am the slowest reader Victorians group ever saw anyway!

Since this is a Buddy Read, and obviously a smaller group (all who are reading, please join in on comments), I see no reason why we should not extend into July as needed."


Excellent. It's not that you're a slow reader; I think there is no way to read this poem quickly and still give it fair attention. In Bacon's tripartite division of books ("some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested") this one may even be beyond mere chewed and digested.


message 4: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2531 comments To add to the last post, I should add that the more I read of the poem the more I find it rewarding slow and deliberative reading.


message 5: by Wyntrnoire (new)

Wyntrnoire | 13 comments I've read the 3rd section and hope to post very soon. It was interesting how I was able to follow it without much difficulty and then hit a snag. But snags are good--you have to put more effort into thinking your way through. And, SarahC, you are not the slowest reader on Victorians:) I am a slow reader in general. I read every single word and look up all the ones I don't know. (Then I get lost in the dictionary.)


message 6: by SarahC (new)

SarahC (sarahcarmack) | 1424 comments Wyntrnoire, we certainly have that in common, haha.


message 7: by Wyntrnoire (new)

Wyntrnoire | 13 comments I've read this section through again and no snag this time--not even sure where it was. I did find this in XCVI and thought it a great compliment to his friend and to, perhaps, all in "doubt" of their faith.

"Perplext in faith, but pure in deeds,
At last he beat his music out.
There lives more faith in honest doubt,
Believe me, than in half the creeds."

(Hoping Everyman returns soon to spark up the ashy hearth here:)


message 8: by Becky (new)

Becky | 170 comments I've been flagging in reading this, I think the topic is just too depressing in general for my frame of mind. Its an absolutely beautiful poem, but I always walk away feeling a little sad. Thats not always a bad thing, but it just hasn't been my "mood."

That said, I'm glad that Wyn pointed out the same quote I'm about to

There lives more faith in honest doubt,
Believe me, than in half the creeds.

He fought his doubts and gather’d strength,
He would not make his judgment blind,
He faced the spectres of the mind
And laid them: thus he came at length

To find a stronger faith his own;
And Power was with him in the night,
Which makes the darkness and the light,
And dwells not in the light alone,


This has been particularly hard for me. My family is devout Protestants, my husband's devout Catholics. I converted to Catholicism for the marriage, but my husband and I are both devoutly anti-organzied religion. We're both deeply believing people, we just don't believe in the structure of religion, and particularly how it fits us. We've never ever said anything to either of our parents, we're perfectly happy with THEM going to Church, and we even happily tag along for the family Christmas excursion, becase we feel its important to be together. It has become a HUGE issue on their part though. We are constantly badgered with -even- attempted bribes to get us to go back to church (crazy right? I'm adult, dont try and give me money to go to church).

These lines from the poem put so succinctly what I've been trying to tell our own parents. That our faith is more important to us because we are working out what we want to or don't want to believe in, and that they just have to give us time.

I think I will put that quote in letters addressed to them!


message 9: by Everyman (new)

Everyman | 2531 comments Becky wrote: "I've been flagging in reading this, I think the topic is just too depressing in general for my frame of mind. Its an absolutely beautiful poem, but I always walk away feeling a little sad. Thats no..."

Thanks for sharing that very special aspect of your life. Yes, the poem has a great deal of wisdom to offer.

Although I agree with you that much of the poem is deeply sad, I do find that the sadness is lifted in the later portions of the poem, and hope emerges as the final emotion I am left with after Tennyson has worked through that deep and long vale of grief.


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