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Faulkner Read Along > The Sound and the Fury

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message 1: by Amy (new)

Amy | 463 comments Anyone out there reading The Sound and the Fury? I wish I was heading to Oxford to Booktopia, but I have had to just get by with reading books by the Oxford Booktopia's authors and the Faulkner read-a-long is my last one (author). While I am finally starting to kind of understand what is going on, I am really thrown off by the order/non-order of the dates of the four chapters. I am about halfway (51% according to my Kindle) through, and kind of getting a headache from all the back and forth. Also, there are sentences that don't really end (no punctuation, no real meaning) and I am wondering if this is a Kindle formatting error or if this exists in print too. Anyone know?


message 2: by Ellen (new)

Ellen B Hi Amy,

I'm at about the same place you are (about to start the 3rd chapter). I'm also getting lost sometimes. I got more lost in the 1st chapter than the 2nd. It's still not my typical kind of book (kind of glad I didn't read any Faulkner in high school).


message 3: by Amy (new)

Amy | 463 comments Is Quentin a girl or boy? I had thought he was a boy then a girl, then a boy (he goes to Harvard, finds a little girl, etc), and now in chapter 3 it sounds like a girl. I offer as an example on location 3156 in the Kindle edition (just a few pages into chapter 3) "Quentin was leaning against the table, fastening her kimono. I looked at her." It would seem the last reference this pronoun her is going back to is Quentin. So frustrating!


message 4: by Ellen (new)

Ellen B I noticed that too! It happened in the first chapter as well...switched back and forth. I was going to mention it above. Very puzzling.


message 5: by Kathy (new)

Kathy There are two Quentins, one a boy and one a girl.


message 6: by Amy (new)

Amy | 463 comments Two? Huh...must have missed this. Thanks for clarifying for me!


message 7: by Ellen (new)

Ellen B Something tells me we'll find out by the end of the book.


message 8: by Kathy (new)

Kathy One Quentin is Caddie's brother and the other is her daughter. You'll find out why she used the name in a few more chapters.


message 9: by Becky (new)

Becky Yamarik | 73 comments Amy wrote: "Anyone out there reading The Sound and the Fury? I wish I was heading to Oxford to Booktopia, but I have had to just get by with reading books by the Oxford Booktopia's authors and the Faulkner rea..."

Hang in there. . . the 3rd and 4th sections are much easier to read b/c they are more linear. I also cheated and read a synopsis of the plot so I could figure out who's who. . . is that cheating? I guess so. . . anyway, after Quentin's section at Harvard it's all downhill from there.


message 10: by Linda (new)

Linda | 2805 comments Mod
Becky wrote: "Amy wrote: "Anyone out there reading The Sound and the Fury? I wish I was heading to Oxford to Booktopia, but I have had to just get by with reading books by the Oxford Booktopia's authors and the ..."

I would (will) do the same thing, Becky, if I need to. I did that with I think it was Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy


message 11: by Amy (last edited Jun 18, 2012 09:29AM) (new)

Amy | 463 comments Becky wrote: "I also cheated and read a synopsis of the plot so I could figure out who's who. . . is that cheating? ..."

Nope, not cheating, resourceful :) I finished the book up this weekend. It was an interesting way to write, which I admire, but it just wasn't for me. I don't like feeling confused for more than 50% of a book.


message 12: by Becky (new)

Becky Yamarik | 73 comments after I finished it I felt that if I'd turned right around and read it again, that I'd figure out a lot more. . . I did write to my high school English teacher and he said that they don't teach it anymore. He seemed sad about that and wondered whether kids don't have the attention span for Faulkner anymore in the age of twitter and the internet. I think that one reason high school English teachers love Faulkner is that you can read his books 10 times and still find something new that you'd missed before. That must be a nice antidote to boredom and burnout as a teacher. . . is this true, you English teachers out there?


message 13: by Amy (new)

Amy | 463 comments Becky wrote: " I also cheated and read a synopsis of the plot so I could figure out who's who. . . is that cheating?..."

I am not a HS English teacher but have several friends who are. None of them teach it, not all of them have read any Faulkner. I'll have to ask those that did if that rings true :)

We did not read this or any Faulkner in HS. For AP Lit my senior year, I did select The Sound and the Fury for my senior paper. I must admit I couldn't make it through the first chapter and didn't want to cheat with SparkNotes. I almost immediately switched to Lord of the Flies, which is way more up a high schooler's alley IMHO. I don't know that it has to do with attention-span - Ineternet was "invented" in 1995 when I was a Junior, so all we really had was AOL IM to distract us. Reading it now, with 15 more years of life experience and still not "getting" it, I get why those who are given Faulkner in HS get turned off.


message 14: by C. Scott (new)

C. Scott Kippen (skippen) One fact of The Sound and the Fury. If Faulker had his way, it would have been printed in multiple colors (red, green were ones he mentioned). He wanted that (according to Blotner's biography) to denote all the different narrators, so you didn't have to work it out in your head.

The William Faulkner Reading Companion is really nice to have alongside while you read The Sound and the Fury to just keep the characters straight.


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