Grace Filled Fiction Spotlight discussion

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Controversial Topics > Christianity Today and the trials of the christian indie

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message 1: by D.M. (new)

D.M. Dutcher  | 9 comments A brief but interesting article at CT is about the pitfalls of Christian authors giving books away on Kindle only to find poor reviews from readers not liking the religious content:

http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2...

Thoughts?


message 2: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Brink (bikerbabs) | 3 comments It's a sad but true fact that people today are more offended by Christian faith expressed in a novel than by overt sexual scenes, foul language or violence. I've read a number of scathing reviews put up on different Christian novels by people who just seem to hate Christianity. Apparently everyone has the right to express themselves except Christians.
The mystery is why they download a book they have no interest in and then complain about the content. I'm not going to go buy or download for free, something I know will go against everything I believe and then write a scathing review about why that person has no right to write what she wrote.
Amazon lets you download free samples, and most every book comes with a blurb that pretty much sums up the plot.
Truthfully, I think the problem is deeper than just Christian novels. Amazon forums and reviews make it a lot easier for angry people with no purpose other than to go off on strangers, to use their anonymity to spew hatred in a sad attempt at making themselves feel important. They are cyber bullies and there is not a lot to be done about them without the freedom of speech we all enjoy being stifled.


message 3: by Jason (last edited Jun 14, 2012 09:31AM) (new)

Jason (jasonh) Though I have commented on this elsewhere, it it not surprising that Christian authors face criticism regarding their religious content. There are innumerable different "Christian" worldviews, and when an author presents one such view, he/she can become a target for those who believe it is theologically incorrect. They face criticism from both sides of the fence - believers and non-believers.


message 4: by Mel (new)

Mel Menzies (mel_menzies) | 24 comments I think, Barbara, that you've highlighted a modern phenomenon - only it's not as modern as we like to think. Scripture tells us quite explicitly that we will be persecuted, and the vociferousness of people without a faith never ceases to amaze me when it comes to telling those with a faith the error of their ways. Sometimes this takes the form of opposing views - as in atheism - sometimes in the 'delight' of correcting Christians whom they perceive as failing in the manifestation of their faith. I've had the 'call yourself a Christian' rebuke thrown at me on a number of occasions by people who never darken the doorway of church, and who have never opened a Bible in their lives. What makes it a modern problem is the ease and - as you say - the anonymity - afforded by the internet.
Sadly, that means that Jason is also right, and that Christians join the fray. Sometimes I wonder why God doesn't simply press the Delete button on humanity. But then he's obviously more loving and more patient than I am...


message 5: by Alan (new)

Alan (professoralan) | 32 comments As Jason said, much of the harshest comments I've faced online over my faith have come from brothers and sisters.


message 6: by Nike (last edited Jun 25, 2012 07:37AM) (new)

Nike Chillemi | 482 comments Mod
Jason wrote: "Though I have commented on this elsewhere, it it not surprising that Christian authors face criticism regarding their religious content. There are innumerable different "Christian" worldviews, and..."

Jason, very true. the criticism can come from our side of the fence.


message 7: by Mary (new)

Mary Findley | 5 comments "These men defame the goddess!"
"You cast out Devils by the Prince of Devils."
"Paul, much learning makes you mad."

Nothing new under the sun. Grab a free book, attack the author, because he writes about Christianity, or because he doesn't write about YOUR Christianity. :-(


message 8: by Nike (new)

Nike Chillemi | 482 comments Mod
Mary wrote: ""These men defame the goddess!"
"You cast out Devils by the Prince of Devils."
"Paul, much learning makes you mad."

Nothing new under the sun. Grab a free book, attack the author, because he write..."


Poor Christian authors. The Christian haters w/write an ugly review and those who have a "different" Christianity will also throw rocks. We'd better put on our armour.


message 9: by Mary (new)

Mary Findley | 5 comments Amen, Nike! :-)


message 10: by Lianne (new)

Lianne Simon (liannesimon) "But let none of you suffer as a murderer, or as a thief, or as an evildoer, or as a busybody in other men's matters. Yet if any man suffer as a Christian, let him not be ashamed; but let him glorify God on this behalf."

I recently read a book by an avowed atheist. Had I not known before starting, I would not have finished it due to some 'preaching' that had little to do with the theme of the book. I would expect a similar reaction out of him with some Christian fiction.

Isn't there really only one critic who matters?


message 11: by Nike (new)

Nike Chillemi | 482 comments Mod
Lianne wrote: ""But let none of you suffer as a murderer, or as a thief, or as an evildoer, or as a busybody in other men's matters. Yet if any man suffer as a Christian, let him not be ashamed; but let him glori..."

I agree there's only one reviewer who matter. But, if God has given us a book to write, presumably He wants it read. So, we do have a responsibility to get it out there. That means we have to do some dreaded MARKETING.

One helpful thing is to get friends to read the book and write a review so there are several very positive reviews from a Christian world view up for readers to see.


message 12: by Lianne (new)

Lianne Simon (liannesimon) I agree we need to do some marketing--among other things. But, I look at the whole authorship adventure in terms of dominion. As in anything else--if success depends on me, then there is no hope. And yet I have a publisher. And two very good editors. And critique partners who pray for me and my writing.


message 13: by Nike (new)

Nike Chillemi | 482 comments Mod
Lianne wrote: "I agree we need to do some marketing--among other things. But, I look at the whole authorship adventure in terms of dominion. As in anything else--if success depends on me, then there is no hope. A..."

I hate to say that God gave me my stories...but God did in fact give me my stories. And He did so for a very specific purpose. There are specific folks He wants me to try to reach...the nominal Christian, the backslidden, the wishy-washy sortof Christian, the in name only Christian. This is who He wants my novels witness to. He also wants me to entertain committed Christians.

I've always felt that if He's told me He wants me to reach them, and I have a few marketing skills, I should use them.


message 14: by Lianne (new)

Lianne Simon (liannesimon) Yes. You should certainly use all of the talents He's given you. :)


message 15: by Skylar (new)

Skylar Burris (skylarburris) | 9 comments I’ve only faced harsh comments from the readers of my fiction who did not expect to be getting Christian content at all. My books have Christian characters, and Christian content, but I wouldn’t really call them “Christian novels.” They weren’t written with that intent. They’re historical romances, and some people have stumbled on them looking only for that and then been annoyed that the historical Christianity that was historically a part of the people’s lives actually gets some air time. I have yet to receive any negative reviews from Christians for not being Christian enough, but that's probably because it's not entirely and purely presented/marketd as Christian fiction and most readers are non-Christian. If it had been published by a CBA publisher, I'd likely get flack for the drinking and occasional doubts expressed by characters and various other things.


message 16: by Nike (new)

Nike Chillemi | 482 comments Mod
A really good crime fic novel that has a well developed Christian secndary character, but I couldn't really say Christian content is REVENGE by Mark Young. His Christian charcters represent the faith well, but there are no overt Christian themes in any sense of the word. He successfully sold it as an action-adventure thriller in the general market and also sold it in the Chrisian market. His Christian charcter was very likable, wise, fair, nonjudemental, and not too sweet or sugary. He didn't get any criticism from angry secular people. Revenge (A Travis Mays Novel) by Mark Young


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