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Publishing Discussion > Reviews Made You Depressed?

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message 1: by L'Poni (last edited Jun 08, 2012 02:05AM) (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments I don't know what folder this belongs in, so I put it here. If it's the wrong folder, please forgive me and I'm sorry, I just need to say this. Here goes, i'll be short with it:

I was/am the author of a little innovative book+magazine eSeries I liked to call The Society On Da Run. On Smashwords, I published 30+ "issues," which were mostly singular stories. When I joined a YA group, I got a nice review on the first issue. Also, I got good feedback from the omnibus edition. When I joined another YA group and asked for reviews on the first issue, guess what happened?

I GOT BAD REVIEWS.

On the contrary, the long book was getting great feedback, but it made me depressed that the first issue got such horrible feedback. I came to conclude that releasing the stories in that book+magazine/singular story form was not making me look good, whereas the omnibus book, which was over 230k words, was getting better feedback. I became so upset over the bad reviews that I cancelled the singular issues, including forthcoming ones. I am now focusing on updating the longer version with stories each month in a new genre I created, but I'm still feeling depressed about cancelling the singular series. I've never let a bad review make me depressed like this and I don't know if those reviews were the push I needed or the arrows that unintentionally pierced me. Have you let bad reviews get to you like this?


message 2: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) OK, first tip: don't read your reviews! ;-)
Second tip: good or bad, just take them for what they are - someone's idea of your writing. And remember: you can't please everyone. Some will love your story, some will hate it. Happens even to best-sellers.
Now put back on the single issues and then bundles of 5 or 10 stories (the Dean Wesley Smith approach that I use for my graphic novel) and then maybe the omnibus in 1 or 2 volumes (depending on final length).
And remember: the first rule is... ignore reviews! :-)
Happy writing!
Barb


message 3: by L'Poni (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments Barbara wrote: "OK, first tip: don't read your reviews! ;-)
Second tip: good or bad, just take them for what they are - someone's idea of your writing. And remember: you can't please everyone. Some will love your ..."


Thank you for the advice! For me it's kinda hard to ignore the reviews, but I'll try not to pay attention to them and restart the eSeries.


message 4: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Jaq wrote: "How could a writer not read their reviews? Human nature wouldn't allow us to resist. ;)

Right folder BTW, definitely an issue related to publishing."


sure, read them, just don't respond! :-D


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

I try not to visit Barnes and Noble. That seems to be the site where the ratings are either fives or ones. On Amazon, smashwords and GR, you can't do it so anonymously, so there aren't drive-by ratings. I am going to 'like' all and any reviews I get on GR, no matter the rating. But definitely no comments, and no other response.


message 6: by L'Poni (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments Georgina wrote: "I try not to visit Barnes and Noble. That seems to be the site where the ratings are either fives or ones. On Amazon, smashwords and GR, you can't do it so anonymously, so there aren't drive-by rat..."

A while ago I thanked a few people that reviewed my stuff because reviews are so rare for me. I noticed I get mostly one stars on B&N, and I got one star on 3 of my books, and the reviewer didn't leave a single review except some strange anime wolf story. I was wondering if he (or she) was trying to submit to one of my anime magazines. They didn't have to leave so many negative reviews just to get me to notice. It was strange.


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

B&N seems to encourage drive-bys. I get my lowest ratings there, and most snarky comments too.


message 8: by L'Poni (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments Georgina wrote: "B&N seems to encourage drive-bys. I get my lowest ratings there, and most snarky comments too."

Another strange thing, I get more sales off there than I do from Amazon. I wonder what causes that?


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Unless my stories are going free on Amazon I get zilch sales. Wait, I'm lying, I think I've sold two Fairy Tales for Freya and one Sorrow's Child (Thanks Tony, I KNOW it must have been you:)).

I have had great downloads from B&N too, but only of my free stories. I've sold some on Sony though, and Apple. Now I'll be honest and tell you my smashwords account balance (since Nov 2011). Wait for it....drum roll please....$16.87. Wow, it's actually gone up by a couple of dollars. *Swoons, and has to fan herself*


message 10: by L'Poni (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments Georgina wrote: "Unless my stories are going free on Amazon I get zilch sales. Wait, I'm lying, I think I've sold two Fairy Tales for Freya and one Sorrow's Child (Thanks Tony, I KNOW it must have been you:)).

I h..."


lol, mine is $14.58, most of it coming from B&N. It's strange how the world works.


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

Very. :D Hey, soon we'll have made enough $ to buy ourselves a cup of coffee and a piece of cake!


message 12: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) my first Smashwords payment (that I got at the end of April) was 35$ and change. And it's the sales from last year to first quarter of this year. In December 2011 I had 9.13$, so I didn't reach the minimum to be paid... but then,the difference is all sales of the first quarter of 2012, so it's rising! :-)
And I'm very close to the 100$ minimum to get that Amazon check - after one year! Yay!
And I hate the anonymity of reviews of B&N, so I don't check that either anymore. And I hate no-text reviews as well, a well done 1 star review is more helpful that a blank rating, right?


message 13: by L'Poni (last edited Jun 10, 2012 01:03AM) (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments Barbara wrote: "my first Smashwords payment (that I got at the end of April) was 35$ and change. And it's the sales from last year to first quarter of this year. In December 2011 I had 9.13$, so I didn't reach the..."

You're right, a well written 1-star review serves it's purpose better than a textless one. Congratulations on reaching Amazon's $100 minimum.


message 14: by L'Poni (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments Georgina wrote: "Very. :D Hey, soon we'll have made enough $ to buy ourselves a cup of coffee and a piece of cake!"

A piece of cake costs that much? Omg, it must be a premium piece of cake!

The cake is a lie!

Sorry, I had to insert that cake joke in there. Couldn't help it :)


message 15: by [deleted user] (new)

Ah the life of indie writers, huh? Lucky we love writing. Exhibiting art's the same. (That's my background before writing). You spend two, three years producing a body of work, exhibit it, sell a couple of artworks, if you're lucky, then move on to beginning on your next work. Unless you're Jeff Koons you don't make money.

Now what we need to do is to change genres, and write a book called 49 1/2 Shades of Red, the story of a virginal vampire and a domineering, but lust-inspiring werewolf, set within the stark desolation of a post-apocalyptic world. :):)


message 16: by [deleted user] (new)

Nipaporn wrote: "Georgina wrote: "Very. :D Hey, soon we'll have made enough $ to buy ourselves a cup of coffee and a piece of cake!"

A piece of cake costs that much? Omg, it must be a premium piece of cake!

The c..."


Well, maybe not quite, coffee, cake and a biscuit :)


message 17: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Georgina wrote: "Ah the life of indie writers, huh? Lucky we love writing. Exhibiting art's the same. (That's my background before writing). You spend two, three years producing a body of work, exhibit it, sell a c..."

hahahaha!! :-D
I have an idea for a Desi vampire, think it would sell? ;-)


message 18: by L'Poni (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments Georgina wrote: "Ah the life of indie writers, huh? Lucky we love writing. Exhibiting art's the same. (That's my background before writing). You spend two, three years producing a body of work, exhibit it, sell a c..."

We should all collaborate and write it, but I'm not to keen on vamps and wolves because they're a trend. I'm more comfortable writing about a vampire-werewolf-dragon hybrid shifter (mostly because I wrote about one before, and it's half dragon!)

Oh, one more thing:




message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

Let them eat cake.


message 20: by [deleted user] (new)

Barbara wrote: "Georgina wrote: "Ah the life of indie writers, huh? Lucky we love writing. Exhibiting art's the same. (That's my background before writing). You spend two, three years producing a body of work, exh..."

Desi Vampire?


message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

Jaq wrote: "Whenever I have a filming day I post "The cake is real" on my status, because we always have cake with whatever I feed the crew. It's a tradition now.

So,

THE CAKE IS REAL!

But not today...

Yes..."


I agree The Cake is real! And what's more it is Delicious! My take on the cake question, life, the universe and everything. Not really but on eating cake and writing.
http://www.goodreads.com/author_blog_...

Cat shifter. Love the idea!

Have you read the Mavin Manyshaped series by :Sheri S. Tepper? Really good shape shifting fantasy.


message 22: by Barbara (last edited Jun 11, 2012 06:11AM) (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Desi vampire: Indian from India vampire, so you don't get confused (I normally call the First Nations "Native Americans" for that reason, but lots of people call them Indians - so just to avoid the confusion, I'll call him "Desi" vampire, Indians from India will know what I mean, and everybody else, I'll explain, LOL!)! :-)


message 23: by L'Poni (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments A reviewer that I sent my book to said he/she couldn't go through with the review. She sent me the review she would have published, and I'm thankful she did not publish it. My god, it was painful. So painful, it made my heart stop. The only true good review I ever gotten was from a guy named Oldog Oltrix on Amazon, and Dragonstark and my friends Reesh and Mia Myakovsky (I told those two yankers not to publish their review because they're my friends). I got a few good comments from people on Wattpad and a nice lady on Authonomy, but I'm trying to get over this review. Reading through the review, she raised a few key points that I should have explained better (like the Macintosh and Windows cyborgs falling in love), and I already made a timeline for the book, but reading the rest of it, knowing...

MY GOD, I feel so terrible. So now I am seeking a few beta readers to look at the book and get their thoughts. Anybody interested? Georgina, you have the Kindle edition of the book so you can lend me your thoughts whenever you get to it. Anyone else is free to say if they want to be my beta reader. I rebooted the magazine series, so I feel alright about continuing it (mostly because it's not the whole book).

I know I've updated the book so much since I sent it to the reviewer, but still....seeing the review...I had a Valley Girl moment. I cannot let anyone see the review because I believe it remains property of the reviewer her/him/self.

Sorry to take the discussion away from the Desi Vampire. That sounds like an interesting concept. I could whip up a story about one if anyone likes. Maybe it'll help cool me down.



I WANT MY MOMMY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


message 24: by [deleted user] (new)

I'd love too, Nipaporn, but I'm writing at the moment. I've only got six weeks to finish it before it's due at my developmental editors! And I need to keep to my deadline or it won't be out in time later this year. (This is book two in my series.)

You should make a thread for it, calling for Beta Readers.

In terms of the review, if it's constructive, it's a bit like a beta read. But sometimes it's just opinion, and everyone's different. It depends on how you feel inside about it. Does it confirm any of your own worries about the work? That's what I go by. Of course with beta readers I listen to everything, all and every gripe. I want to know so that I can fix the issues before publishing the book. That's also what a developmental editor does--it's a book doctor--they tell you what ails it and what can be done to fix it.

The Desi Vampire is being written by Barb at the moment!

Wish I could help more! I'm am sure you will get beta readers from this group. :):)


message 25: by L'Poni (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments I re-read the review and it's not so bad the second time around. I did explain almost all the issues she/he raised in the review. Thank god I made that answer key at the end of the book. I really wish she would finish it so she could feel the originality of it, especially with the character Martha Recalcitrant and Ashuton Karrucci. I had to do a lot of research on things like chmod000, binary codes, macintosh terminal codes, galactic planes and all of that good stuff for the book.

And so far I am a paragraph into that Desi vampire fic.


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

Oh, so she hasn't finished reading it yet? I don't think it's possible to judge the whole by part.

Yes, most reviews do seem less harsh second time reading. It's the pain factor--you've felt it once, it's dulled next time round. :) Except for one I had for a fairy tale (my favourite one, none the less) that read, 'Nineteen pages deleted.' That pretty much didn't need a re-reading.


message 27: by L'Poni (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments Georgina wrote: "Oh, so she hasn't finished reading it yet? I don't think it's possible to judge the whole by part.

Yes, most reviews do seem less harsh second time reading. It's the pain factor--you've felt it o..."


What you received was not a review. It was most likely a troll trying to down an indie author. Someone reviewed one of my stories on B&N and said "horrible and weird. don't bother." Since it was such a short review that didn't go into depth, I dismissed it. You should dismiss reviews like those. They're pretty much insignificant one-liners that mean nothing. The reviewer didn't say anything specific about your story or why they didn't like it. Trolls are the moldy expired cake of the internet.


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

The Cake that should not be eaten.


message 29: by L'Poni (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments Georgina wrote: "The Cake that should not be eaten."

Yup! I'd rather throw it in the incinerator.


message 30: by [deleted user] (new)

Two reviews, one book, both gratefully appreciated! Both equally honest and true. These are from 'Two Girls One Book', reviews for Sorrow's Child.

"Christine 4/5

'Sorrow’s Child', the first novel in 'The Taint' series, is a dark fairytale steeped in myth and magic. In a richly gothic setting, 'Sorrow’s Child' is a coming of age story and a tale of betrayal and bloody revenge.

On the Isle of Muin, one of the thirteen scattered Meda Isles, Lilith, a young orphan and an indentured servant, is found guilty of witchcraft and is condemned to hang...

This gothic fairy tale captured my interest immediately. The story starts with a hangman's noose and journeys from there into a dark, magical world full of good, evil, mystery and craft. Richly written and well researched, Sorrow's child is vivid with imagination and a sense of danger that will have you flipping the pages for more. Though the story did lag at times, the plot was so suspenseful I couldn't stop reading, and by the end of the book, I wanted to start the next one immediately.

Heather 2/5

This book put me to sleep. Seriously. And on more than 1 occasion.

And what boggles me about that is after you finish the book and sit back and reflect on it, the synopsis isn’t bad.

Lilith, the novels main character, is saved from the gallows and sent to Branwen Tower as a sorcerers apprentice. She stumbles across the dark secrets of her heritage and quickly becomes aware that the sorcerer that she trusted in the beginning has his own agenda, which involves a couple of ounces of her bodily fluid.

Sounds intriguing right? Not really.

I admit that the author is well written, but the way the story was told it was dull and predictable. I found myself struggling to get through it, and was relieved that the last 20 pages or so were a dictionary and a...tree calendar

In short, this novel was not for me. Unless of course I need something to help me sleep at night."

So, am I happy that one of the reviewers really liked it? No. I'm being a typical writer/artist type and dwelling on the fact that my writing put someone to sleep. Ahh! I sent her to sleep! I can't think of anything worse. My attempt at seduction didn't work. I have been found wanting. Boring. Sleep worthy. Seriously, the only thing worse is a dnf.

The problem is, as the typical artist/writer types we will always judge our efforts by the harshest reviews. To me the only answer lies in writing. In writing the next book I will ultimately grow as a writer. I will also have the excuse to return to my never ending world of imaginary excess--and isn't that the joy? Imagination has no limits, and as writers, it is OUR world! Enjoy! :)


message 31: by [deleted user] (new)

I think if the review hurts, then it's struck a nerve and should be listened to. I compare reviews too, marking key points. The pace of my story clearly lags at certain points. Tony commented on that too. I risk losing people along the way. Now my question would be, since this is the digital edition, and I've haven't released the paperback yet, should I go back and cut/tweak to get the pace right? Or am I obsessing?

At what point do we move on from a story? I feel like I have let Lilith down. Yet I know this first novel is by far the slowest moving of the four. It was a tricky story to tell, but it had to be told so that Lilith was ready to begin her merry antics, with kick-butt attitude in place.

I haven't had experience with sock puppets myself, although I have received one star ratings for my fairy tales. People seem to either love or hate them. But I have seen such tactics applied to others.


message 32: by L'Poni (last edited Jul 03, 2012 03:43PM) (new)

L'Poni (lponi) | 60 comments Georgina wrote: "I think if the review hurts, then it's struck a nerve and should be listened to. I compare reviews too, marking key points. The pace of my story clearly lags at certain points. Tony commented on th..."

You should wait for more reviews and see what they say or get beta readers. I listened to the bad review I got (which was risky because it's the only review I ever got) and asked myself what to chop and what not to chop.


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

I had a great team: developmental editor, about ten beta readers, a copy editor (and a literary agent pitching it for me before that). The thing is, with a publisher it would go back and forth to the dev ed, to really streamline things. I couldn't really afford to do that. Each novel costs me close to 1,500 as it is. I could send it back to my dev ed now, but my next book is due to be sent to her in a month, so it will slow everything down...

But these lines from two positive reviews both point out the lagging pace:

"Though the story did lag at times, the plot was so suspenseful I couldn't stop reading, and by the end of the book, I wanted to start the next one immediately."

"I got a bit bogged down in all the minutiae of mixing potions and creating tinctures etc. "

I haven't released the paperback yet as I wanted to wait for more feedback. I know you can't please everyone but if everyone notes the same points, well, a bit hard to ignore isn't it? *Sigh*


message 34: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Guys, stop fretting! ;-) Unless you really realy really think (YOU) something is wrong with the story, rewrite. If not, leave it alone.
See Kris Rusch's post on perfection: http://kriswrites.com/2012/06/27/the-...
I know, it takes confidence and self-esteem, but you don't want to end up in rewriting hell, do you? You have plenty more stories to write, right?
Happy writing! :)
Barb


message 35: by [deleted user] (new)

Breathe deep. Dismiss your emotions to go play somewhere. Then reduce what you have received to a process;

First, toss, shred, delete, or whatever, any review(er) who has nothing to say but, "This book sucks." These are wannabes who have no clue how to create a complex and engaging piece of art. They would trade their mothers to be able to do what you have done, and since they know in their heart-of-hearts that they will never wield that kind of talent, they work tirelessly to bring you down to their level: Worthless.

Second, the critics who were willing to elaborate on what they felt were problems could have valid points. Read their critiques with as objective an eye as you are able. If one in four reviewers point out the same problem, there may be something to it, and it's an area you need to look at, but if their complaints are random; one guy doesn't like this, another doesn't like that, then they are just comparing your work to their own preferences, and noting the points where the story took a different course than they would have preferred.

Finally, keep firmly in the center of your windshield that fact that YOU are the artist here, and at the end of the day, a critic is just some guy with an opinion. Tell the story that YOU want to tell; you've done a wonderful thing.

I wrote five novels and spent a decade trying unsuccessfully to get published. Friends and family swore it was political, but that isn't how the industry works. If any agent had read my manuscript and said to himself, "this is going to be the next Harry Potter, and they'll have to print more money to pay us for it," that would have been all the politics that he needed to know. You've broken into the temple, so to speak, and the only way that happens is through superior talent. Enjoy what you've accomplished, and let the little hounds bay helplessly at your train as it rolls on by...

Best of luck to you!

- Jack


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Thank you, Barb and Jack! I think I've been obsessing (my, don't you do it so well, Gina? )

"Writers who are always improving, always learning, move forward. They are secure in the knowledge that the book they wrote ten years ago is the best book it could have been given their level of craft and their understanding of the art of writing at the time they finished the book. They’re better now, so they write new things, explore new pathways.

They grow."

She's wooed me with this blog, however offended I was with her earlier advice. :)

O.K I think I'm a prime candidate for obsessing with getting things just right. But now I have to move on. You are quite right, I have books to finish. The funny thing is, I have just started writing in a new genre under a pen name, and it's all flowing pretty easily, well almost prolifically. I think I suffer from stage fright....


message 37: by [deleted user] (new)

Georgina wrote: "Thank you, Barb and Jack! I think I've been obsessing (my, don't you do it so well, Gina? )

"Writers who are always improving, always learning, move forward. They are secure in the knowledge that ..."


Be cautious with material that flows too easily. An early mentor once told me that if it's going too well, you're taking the easy path. If you want to challenge your readers, you must first challenge yourself. Just something else to think about...


message 38: by [deleted user] (new)

Fair enough, you seem to know what you're doing! The rationale was that the obvious path, answer, plot point or whatever is the first one that comes to mind, and if you never stop and examine that choice, you'll wind up with a book with an obvious plot. In fairness, I never got published, so maybe there's nothing to it. Just a point to consider...


message 39: by [deleted user] (new)

Jack wrote: "Be cautious with material that flows too easily. An early mentor once told me that if it's going too well, you're taking the easy path. If you want to challenge your readers, you must first challenge yourself. ... "

My new genre isn't too taxing :) I have decided that literature--not even pulp fantasy fiction--does not pay. I'm following my tendency to make it racy. I'm just aiming to write it well, and a little differently. These are short stories. Having fun though...

I'm also finishing the second book in my series, but that's where the stage fright kicks in...

I think I will hold off with the paperback. I see no hoard threatening to batter down my door, screaming for a physical copy of my work :)

The pace thing is interesting. Modern novels are of a faster pace. Gender stuff comes into it too.

I can't cut the herb room or kitchen passages without compromising the mythological/craft elements I have carefully interwoven. You would get each and all of them Jaq, but others may not. This is basically a Persephone tale. Esha is the Virgin who becomes, through Lilith, the Crone. So when do I think I should cut, to make it a quicker read, and when should I not, due to details that explain the whole?


message 40: by [deleted user] (new)

Jaq wrote: "Jack wrote: "Fair enough, you seem to know what you're doing! The rationale was that the obvious path, answer, plot point or whatever is the first one that comes to mind, and if you never stop and ..."

I have found during my writing days that sometimes a character would do something unexpected, which sounds like what happened to you here. If so, what a great way to build on that surprising event. I sort of wish I hadn't said anything now, as I don't want to discourage Georgina, but I can't unsay it. Let me just say that my only point was, reach for the exceptional, seize the elegance, make YOUR book the one that will cause that critic to title his review, "Holy $#!+, what a ride!"


message 41: by [deleted user] (new)

It's O.K Jack, I'm not discouraged. I'm pathetically obstinate about writing, or else I would have given it up years ago. :)


message 42: by [deleted user] (new)

Good, I wouldn't want to be responsible for throwing water on your fire. I fully "get" your devotion to writing, because I have that, too. Now that I've set aside the stress of seeking publication, though, I'm having the time of my life writing short stories as a hobby. I would never recommend that anyone give up that dream, but it's worked great for me.

You just give 'em heck out there!


message 43: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Jack wrote: "Good, I wouldn't want to be responsible for throwing water on your fire. I fully "get" your devotion to writing, because I have that, too. Now that I've set aside the stress of seeking publication,..."

You mean you're not publishing or you went indie with short stories?!
I hate hearing of writers who give up writing! ;-)


message 44: by [deleted user] (last edited Jul 05, 2012 10:36AM) (new)

Barbara wrote: "Jack wrote: "Good, I wouldn't want to be responsible for throwing water on your fire. I fully "get" your devotion to writing, because I have that, too. Now that I've set aside the stress of seeking..."

Depends on your definition of indie. See, here's my backstory:

Since elementary school, I've been writing odds and ends, essays, short stories, stuff like that. In 1995, I began a project, didn't know what it was going to be in the end, didn't really care. Well, it turned into a fantasy novel. Friends and family raved about how great it was (you know how F&F can be!), and campaigned for me to get it published. Two things about that:

1. Writing novels is incredibly time consuming, and often, working on the novel takes the place of spending time with F&F, and,
2. That was about the time that all the little imprints were being gobbled up by the Big Three, and the ones that were left soon would be.

I gave myself a decade. A decade of sitting alone in a quiet corner shuffling index cards and thumbing through a thesaurus while everyone else was acting like a family. I put in ten years of honest work, writing five novels, and meeting some great professionals along the way. I've gotten rejection slips for my birthday, for Christmas, slips that were sent on my birthday; I once sent a five-pound manuscript across the country, and got a rejection slip four days later! The receptionist had to have handed it to the mailman as he delivered the package. Had I thought to keep all the rejection slips, I probably could have published them as a coffee-table book...

The point is, I was true to my word, as my wife was true to hers. I put in ten honest years as a hermit in my own home, and she didn't bug me about it once. It didn't work out. I could be a troll, and blame everyone around me, but writing is an art, and not everybody who enjoys doing it is at the level to do it professionally. Lots of people who aren't quite "there" in their art paint to relax. I write.

Now I write short stories. I can carry a pocket notebook, and whip it out to record a thought when I'm stuck in traffic, waiting in line, or sitting at my desk at work. When I have the notes I need, I turn them into a short story, writing only when everyone else is otherwise occupied, and putting them up on my website for anyone who cares to read them. I have a small following and a few favorable reviews. If that's what you mean by indie, then I've gone indie.

In any case, my grandkids will have five novels and a collection of stories as part of Grandpa's legacy, and I have a rejuvenating outlet for a lot of energy that I'm sure would otherwise turn negative. I'll never see my name on the shelf at Barnes & Noble, but I have found that what I have fulfills what I need, and that is a wonderful feeling. Life is good, and I hope that you, and everyone who's working to attain some level of recognition in this field, gets what they're hoping for; there really is nothing to compare with it...


message 45: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Awe, my hero! :-)
OK, it's not as hard for me to write, because I've been doing it for 30+ years - writing stories, I mean. Most are unpublishable, of course, but some are pretty good. And because I'm so prolific, I can't be bothered to wait for publishers' replies - and I'm also Italian, so in the wrong country to break in, LOL! (add to that I hate the language of contracts - made to confuse people...)
So I'm happy with the titles I've published so far on Smashwords, Kindle, Xinxii, DriveThru (especially the "Comics" branch, as I do also graphic novels). Sales are tickling it, but I'm happy. I'm not doing it for the money. I like to share my stories and find my readers all over the world. And I know it's not a get-rich-quick thing. I'm proud of myself for putting my stuff out there! :-)
Happy writing!


message 46: by [deleted user] (new)

Publishers take up to nine months (in Aust) to read and decide on whether or not to acquire a manuscript. This time frame is shortened when the writer is represented by a literary agent (usually took from four to six months for me). Then, if the publishers decline (more often than not) off the manuscript goes for another try.

Also in Australia you are not allowed to send it to more than one publisher at once (well, you want to try doing it? Don't expect the publishers in question to deal with you again). Literary agents can take up to a month to reply to your emails. Huh! Don't even try ringing them.

So, years pass, you're still trying to flog your book. It's a bloody painful process too. Certainly never made me feel encouraged to write more. I went indie last year. I carefully and politely broke my contract with my agent and went it alone.

Must admit though, self-publishing doesn't feel in the least bit exciting to me. I don't tell people that I write either. Tell them yourself-published and you get 'that' look. Still, I don't tell people that I'm a visual artist either, no point.


message 47: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) I tell them I'm a writer. And when they as me where they can buy my books, I say "on the internet" - they don't really care if I'm my own publisher or not (unless they're other writers and want to know how to get published, LOL)! :-)


message 48: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm always asked, 'are you published?' I suppose I could say yes. I could say a small house published me (we live in a very small house:D)...


message 49: by April (new)

April Barbara wrote: "I tell them I'm a writer. And when they as me where they can buy my books, I say "on the internet" - they don't really care if I'm my own publisher or not (unless they're other writers and want to ..."

Sorry..was new to the group and stalking around on the
So true, Barbara! My husband is an author and no one ever asks "who published you" just where can they get a copy... and you can be sure...I really don't care where the great stories I read are published...so long as I can get my hands on them! :)


message 50: by Barbara (new)

Barbara Tarn (barbaragtarn) Exactly, April! Readers - REAL readers - don't care who published what. As long as they can find books they love, they're certainly not aware of all the imprints existing (I certainly am not, as a reader)! :)
Again, it's only other writers who wants traditional publisher's validation that ask "who publishes you"! ;-)


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