THE WORLD WAR TWO GROUP discussion

267 views
LAND, AIR & SEA > Discussion Area for Books Covering Elite and Special Forces of WW2

Comments Showing 1-50 of 180 (180 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 3 4

message 1: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (last edited Jun 06, 2012 04:30AM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments description

Members can talk about good books and events covering Elite soldiers or Special Forces of WW2.


message 2: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (last edited Jun 07, 2012 12:11AM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments One of our members (Nicole) was recently reading a book covering the Black Devils; A Perfect Hell. This unit was one of America's earliest Special Forces.

A Perfect Hell by John Nadler by John Nadler

Another book on the same subject but providing an oral history from those who fought and served in the Black Devils is this book:

The Black Devil Brigade The True Story Of The First Special Service Force In World War Ii An Oral History by Joseph A. Springer by Joseph A. Springer
Description:
The American and Canadian army volunteers who formed the innocuously named First Special Service Force in the Montana outback were assembled to perform virtually suicidal raids against German facilities in Norway and the Italian Alps. Filled with first-person accounts from unit members, this history documents the last-minute cancellation of those missions and the force's eventual service first in the Aleutian Islands and later in Italy, where their daring night raids earned the moniker Schwartzer Tuefel -- Black Devils -- from their German enemies. Illustrated with photos of the unit in training and combat, this history also examines how the risk-taking Black Devil Brigade, the antecedent of the current U.S. Army Special Forces, suffered disproportionate casualties and was often misused as line infantry. The story ends with the unit's key role in the 1944 invasion of southern France, after which it was dispersed.


message 3: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (last edited Jun 06, 2012 04:32AM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments If anyone wants to recommend one of their favourite books covering Elite and/or Special Forces of WW2, be it Commandos, SAS, LRDG, Rangers, Paratroopers, etc from any belligerent nation of WW2 please post the information here for the benefit of all members.


message 4: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Here is a book that I read in the late 1970's or early 80's that has been re-released and may interest some members:

Kommando German Special Forces of World War II by James Lucas by James Lucas
Description:
Without these secret agents paving the way, Germany would have found it far more difficult to invade Czechoslovakia and Poland. Kommando details the stunning achievement of Nazi operatives in naval warfare, including suicide pilots, human torpedoes, and the young people of the Werewolf, trained in partisan warfare.


message 5: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments This book covers the Long Range Desert Group (LRDG) and although I haven't read it myself it has picked up some excellent reader reviews elsewhere:

The Long Range Desert Group 1940-1945 Providence Their Guide by David Lloyd Owen by David Lloyd Owen
Description:
The Long Range Desert Group has the distinction of being not just one of the first special forces units to be formed in the Second World War but, more importantly, one of the most effective; General Erwin Rommel is on record as believing so. This splendid record takes the reader behind enemy lines not only in North Africa but in Italy, the Aegean and the Balkans. It paints a vivid picture of the units colourful characters: for example, Ralph Bagnold who put to good use the knowledge he gained from his pre-war desert travels. The LRDG was truly international with New Zealanders and Rhodesians playing key roles. This classic book won acclaim from the critics on its first publication by virtue of the author's unique knowledge, experience and narrative skills. His account of the LRDG's operations is admirably complemented by his shrewd observations of the politico-military climate within the unit operated.

Reviews:
"A splendid Adventure Story." - The Guardian

"A tale of tremendous courage and enthusiasm - A delight to read." - The Field

"Marvellously exciting reading." - The Spectator"

About the Author:
Major-General David Lloyd Owen, CB DSO OBE MC was educated at Winchester College and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst. Commissioned into The Queen's Royal Regiment in 1938, he saw service in Palestine before joining the Long Range Desert Group in 1941. Two years later, at the age of 26, he took over command of the unit until its disbandment in 1945. He has been Chairman of the LRDG Association since 1945. His post-war service included the posts of Military Assistant to the High Commissioner in Malaya (1952-53), Commander 24 infantry Brigade in Kenya (1962-64) and GOC Cyprus District and Near East Land Forces (1966-69). The author, who is married with three sons, is now retired and lives in Norfolk.


message 6: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments This book has been around for some time and offers an interesting insight into one of Germany's special forces unit of WW2:


The Brandenburger Commandos Germany's Elite Warrior Spies in World war II by Franz Kurowski by Franz Kurowski
Description:
Very few books have been written about this clandestine operations unit, which was run by the German Army's intelligence service. Trained to be quick, mobile, and self-reliant and steeped in local customs and languages, the Brandenburgers operated behind enemy lines around the world. From Western Europe to Romania, Russia, Egypt, Afghanistan, and World War II's other fronts, they seized bridges and other strategic targets and engaged in sabotage, espionage, and other daring missions - often bending the rules of war in the process. Although the unit was dissolved in 1944, its tactics influenced special forces around the world both during the war and after.


message 7: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Here is a new release due out in a few months (UK) that may interest those members who enjoy accounts of special forces during WW2:

Commando Winning World War II Behind Enemy Lines by James Owen by James Owen
Description:
June 1940: As Britain's soldiers limped home from Dunkirk, a maverick Army officer was already devising a bold plan to hit back at the enemy. His idea was to revolutionise military thinking and change the face of warfare for ever.

Relying as much on stealth and guile as on courage and stamina, the Commandos brought to the battlefield the skills of the guerrilla. Trained by an unconventional band of experts, and led by a big-game hunter, a film star, a Highland chief and an eccentric wielding a bow and arrow, they became the spearhead of the Allied drive for victory.

Weaving together official documents, new research and veterans' own accounts, Commando reveals for the first time the exhilarating full story of WWII's most formidable fighting force.


message 9: by Geevee, Assisting Moderator British & Commonwealth Forces (new)

Geevee | 3796 comments Jerome thanks for taking the time to do this for others. I am sure people will many to add to TBRs.


message 10: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Yes, some very good titles there Jerome, thanks.


message 11: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 559 comments Oh, and I just found this at my local library:

Commandos and Rangers of World War II by James Ladd

Just started it.


message 12: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 559 comments I would highly recommend Ladd's book also.


message 13: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Good to hear Jerome, thanks :)


message 15: by Mike, Assisting Moderator US Forces (last edited Dec 08, 2012 09:50AM) (new)

Mike | 2803 comments The first 60 pages of Air Commando: Inside The Air Force Special Operations Command deal with the birth of the Air Commandos in the Far East during WW II. There are some great stories, usually recounted by the participants in interviews or in letters. Here is one:

At the start of Orde Wingate’s second irregular warfare effort, Operation Thursday, in Burma, the forces landed in jungle clearings with the intention to build short airstrips to resupply, fly in additional troops, evacuate wounded. Here is a recounting of one hair-raising glider landing:

(view spoiler)


message 16: by Mike, Assisting Moderator US Forces (new)

Mike | 2803 comments Air Force Special Operations Command motto, “Any Time, Any Place”, came from a British unit commander when 4 British and 3 American troops were killed in a training accident preparing for Wingate’s second irregular warfare effort, Operation Thursday, in Burma. The commander sent a note to the Americans not to worry about the accident “please be assured we will go with your boys Any Place, Any Time, Any Where.”


message 17: by Mike, Assisting Moderator US Forces (new)

Mike | 2803 comments The first combat rescue by this aircraft took place during Operation Thursday in Burma. I did not know this until now.

(view spoiler)


message 18: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Mike wrote: "The first 60 pages of Air Commando: Inside The Air Force Special Operations Command deal with the birth of the Air Commandos in the Far East during WW II. There are some great stories, usually reco..."

That's a great story Mike - I bet they were shit scared!


message 19: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Mike wrote: "Air Force Special Operations Command motto, “Any Time, Any Place”, came from a British unit commander when 4 British and 3 American troops were killed in a training accident preparing for Wingate’s..."

That's also a great account about the motto - thanks for posting the details Mike.


message 20: by Geevee, Assisting Moderator British & Commonwealth Forces (new)

Geevee | 3796 comments Mike wrote: "Air Force Special Operations Command motto, “Any Time, Any Place”, came from a British unit commander when 4 British and 3 American troops were killed in a training accident preparing for Wingate’s..."

Thanks Mike that's an interesting piece.


message 22: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Nice book Jerome.


message 23: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (last edited Dec 16, 2012 07:21PM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments One of our group members & GR's authors, Patrick K. O'Donnell, has these great books covering Elite & Special Forces of WW2:

Patrick K. O'Donnell Patrick K. O'Donnell


Beyond Valor
Beyond Valor World War II's Ranger and Airborne Veterans Reveal the Heart of Combat by Patrick K. O'Donnell

Into the Rising Sun
Into the Rising Sun In Their Own Words, World War II's Pacific Veterans Reveal the Heart of Combat by Patrick K. O'Donnell

Operatives, Spies, and Saboteurs
Operatives, Spies, and Saboteurs The Unknown Story of the Men and Women of WWII's OSS by Patrick K. O'Donnell

They Dared Return
They Dared Return An Epic Story of Jewish Refugees Who Escaped Nazi Germany, But Returned for Vengeance by Patrick K. O'Donnell

The Brenner Assignment
The Brenner Assignment The Untold Story of the Most Daring Spy Mission of World War II (Easyread Large Edition) by Patrick K. O'Donnell

Dog Company
Dog Company The Boys of Pointe du Hoc--the Rangers Who Accomplished D-Day's Toughest Mission and Led the Way across Europe by Patrick K. O'Donnell


message 24: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Here are two books covering different aspects of 'special forces' from the other side of the wire:


The SS Hunter Battalions The Hidden History of the Nazi Resistance Movement 1944-5 by Perry Biddiscombe by Perry Biddiscombe

The Last Nazis SS Werewolf Guerrilla Resistance in Europe 1944-1947 by Perry Biddiscombe by Perry Biddiscombe


message 25: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 559 comments Here's some titles on the British efforts to sabotage the Nazi atomic bomb program:

Operation Freshman The Hunt for Hitler's Heavy Water by Jostein Berglyd by Jostein Berglyd

Assault In Norway Sabotaging the Nazi Nuclear Program by Thomas Gallagher by Thomas Gallagher

Skis Against the Atom by Knut Haukelid by Knut Haukelid

The Real Heroes Of Telemark by Ray Mears by Ray Mears

Blood and Water Sabotaging Hitler's Bomb by Dan Kurzman by Dan Kurzman


message 26: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments More good books, thanks Jerome :)


message 27: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Here is an interesting book offering an account of the Italian Decima MAS of WW2 fame:


The Black Prince And The Sea Devils The Story Of Valerio Borghese And The Elite Units Of The Decima Mas by Jack Greene by Jack Greene
Description:
At the beginning of World War II, Prince Junio Valerio Borghese, dashing Italian nobleman, assembled the famous Decima MAS naval unit-the first modern naval commando squad. Borghese's "frogmen" were trained to fight undercover and underwater with small submarines and assault boats armed with a variety of destructive torpedoes. The covert tactics he and the Decima MAS developed, including the use of midget submarines, secret nighttime operations, and small teams armed with explosives, have become a standard for special forces around the world to this very day.After the Italian capitulation in 1943, Borghese determinedly fought on as a Fascist commando leader. After the war, he became a man of mystery, variously said to be involved with several right-wing conspiracies, abortive coups, and clandestine activity. The Prince's death in 1974 was every bit as mysterious as his life.Greene and Massignani have drawn upon official archives as well as information from Allied and Axis veterans in an unprecedented attempt to separate fact from fantasy in this detailed examination of Borghese, the Decima MAS, and the Italian naval special forces.


message 28: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 559 comments Ooh, that looks sweet, thanks, Rick.

Here's a related title:

Sea Devils Italian Navy Commandos in World War II by J. Valerio Borghese by J. Valerio Borghese


Synopsis

Though little known to the English-speaking world, the elite World War II Italian naval unit Decima Flottiglia MAS is considered by many to be the first modern naval commando squad. Assembled by Prince Junio Valerio Borghese at the beginning of the war, these frogmen were trained to fight undercover and underwater with small submarines and assault boats armed with a variety of torpedoes--pioneering tactics that remain a standard for Special Forces around the world today. The commandos story is told by the man who trained and led them in their desperate exploits. Borghese blends his own account with details offered by his men to present valuable insights into one of the Italian s fiercest and most formidable fighting units.


message 29: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Very related indeed :)

Looks like a book worth checking out!


message 30: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments This new release title covers the British Para raid against the German Bruneval facility at Le Havre in 1941:


Night Raid The True Story of the First Victorious British by Taylor Downing by Taylor Downing
Description:
The loss of British bombers over Occupied Europe began to reach alarming levels in 1941. Could it be that the Germans were using a sophisticated form of radar to direct their night fighters and anti-aircraft guns at the British bombers? British aerial reconnaissance discovered what seemed to be a rotating radar tower on a clifftop at Bruneval, near Le Havre. The truth must be revealed.

The decision was taken to launch a daring raid on the Bruneval site to try and capture the technology for further examination. The planned airborne assault would be extremely risky. The parachute regiment had only been formed a year before on Churchill's insistence. This night raid would test the men to the extreme limits of their abilities.

Night Raid tells the gripping tale of this mission from the planning stages, to the failed rehearsals when the odds seemed stacked against them, to the night of the raid itself, and the scientific secrets that were discovered thanks to the paras' precious cargo - the German radar. Its capture was of immense importance in the next stages of the war and the mission itself marked the birth of the legend of the 'Red Devils'.

Review:
"The Bruneval Raid was the start of the airborne brotherhood. Taylor Downing's vivid account brings alive this important turning point in military history with flair and pace." - Andy McNab

Also posted in the New Release section.


message 31: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (last edited Mar 10, 2013 09:04PM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments This new book may interest those readers of 'Special Ops' and the units involved during WWII:


Behind the Lines A Critical Survey of Special Operations in World War II by Michael F. Dilley by Michael F. Dilley
Description:
The array of new technologies that came on the scene in the early 20th century resulted in widely varied new forms of military special operations once civilization embarked on its greatest war. Suddenly, fighting men could be delivered by parachute, submarine, glider, jeeps, and fast amphibious craft deep into enemy territory to perform special tasks; yet others would continue to perform missions the same as their ancestors in previous wars - on foot using stealth, endurance and patience. This work contains discussions of the employment of various special purpose, special mission organizations during World War II. These units operated in Allied and Axis countries and in various theaters of war including Europe, North Africa, the Pacific, Asia, and the continental United States. Representing every major combatant, the operations include various kinds of raids, intelligence gathering missions, support to partisan/guerrilla groups, prisoner rescues, direct-action missions, and at least two where the object was simply to steal something. Some missions would have been officially denied if the operations had been caught in the act. The book is divided into two sections: Behind Enemy Lines and Behind Friendly Lines, to demonstrate that special-purpose organizations can be employed wherever needed, even in areas controlled by military units of their own or allied countries. Many of the units described run the gamut of special mission types, from commando to parachute units, reconnaissance to sabotage units, and partisan training units as well as those with combined missions. Many of the operations described in this book continue to serve as templates for modern Special Operations missions, while still others - the first attempts of their kind - continue to serve as examples of what not to try under the circumstances.

About the Author:
Michael F. Dilley served for 20 years in the U.S. Army's Military Intelligence branch, and for 25 years with the Department of Defense as a contractor in various fields of research, instruction, and investigation.


message 32: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 559 comments This will come out by the end of the month:

Tobruk: A Raid Too Far

Tobruk A Raid Too Far by David Jefferson by David Jefferson

Synopsis

The disastrous raid on Tobruk, the ill-fated Operation Agreement, took place in September 1942. The purpose? To cut off Field-Marshal Rommel's supply line prior to the Battle of El Alamein, which would be crucial in determining the success or failure of the North African campaign. Operation Agreement involved the army, navy and air force together with the Long Range Desert Group and the Special Interrogation Group, who were fluent German speakers who donned Nazi uniforms to carry out risky missions behind enemy lines. For many years, little would be known about the Tobruk raid. One survivor, seconded to the Commandos for the raid, was told in no uncertain terms to keep his mouth shut when returning to his unit. Based on eyewitness accounts and previously unpublished interviews with veterans, Tobruk: A Raid Too Far explores the operation in-depth, highlighting appalling errors of judgement and their tragic consequences, as well as the astonishing trek of survivors across the desert to reach their front lines.


message 33: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Thanks for the details on the book Jerome, it does sound interesting.


message 34: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Here is another new book due out in July of this year that may interest a few members. I think I may have to get a copy myself.

Into the Jaws of Death The True Story of the Legendary Raid on Saint-Nazaire by Robert Lyman by Robert Lyman
Description:
On the night of 28 March 1942 the Royal Navy and British commandos assaulted the German-held French Atlantic port of Saint-Nazaire in one of the most audacious raids of the Second World War. Their plan was simple: to drive an old destroyer packed with three tons of explosive at full speed into the outer gate of the Normandie dock.

Destroying this would deny the formidable Tirpitz battleship, currently lurking menacingly in the Norwegian fjords, a base from which it could inflict devastation upon the convoys supplying Britain from the United States. 'Operation Chariot' was dramatically successful, but at a great cost. Fewer than half the men who went on the mission returned. In recognition of their extraordinary bravery, eighty-nine decorations were awarded, including five Victoria Crosses.

Into the Jaws of Death is a gripping story of high daring that demonstrates how the decisive courage of a small group of men changed the course of the war.


message 35: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Here is a new title for those members who love accounts of WW2 special forces and their operations; The Eyes of the Desert Rats:

The Eyes of the Desert Rats British Long-Range Reconnaissance Operations in the North African Desert 1940-42 by David Syrett by David Syrett
Description:
The extraordinary story of how a relatively small number of dedicated men developed the methods and techniques for crossing the vast unmapped Western Desert Made up of members of the Coldstream and Scots Guards, British yeomanry cavalry regiments, New Zealanders, South Africans, and Indian Army men, the Long Range Desert Group was perhaps the most effective of all the "special forces" established by the Allies during World War II. It was able to go thousands of miles into enemy territory, well-armed and carrying its own supplies of petrol, food and even water to last for weeks at a time, something previously unheard of. Using experience acquired in World War I and inter-war exploration travels, the LRDG thus developed the ability to appear almost anywhere in the desert to carry out almost every type of ground reconnaissance mission possible in desert warfare, exploring and mapping the terrain, transporting agents behind enemy lines or determining the strength and location of enemy forces with an extraordinary degree of accuracy and detail. Equally important were their skills in the art of desert navigation, demonstrated in the outflanking of the enemy during the Allied advance from El Alamein westward to Tunisia, as led by the LRDG. Through meticulous research in original archival material, this book tells the extraordinary story of how a relatively small number of dedicated men developed the methods and techniques for crossing by motor vehicle the depths of the then unmapped and seemingly impassable great Western Desert, during the British Army's North African Campaign of 1940 43. Their tactics, techniques and remarkable success in desert warfare continue to make them of great interest to the student of military affairs. Likewise, as it seeks to answer how the deep desert can best be used for military purposes, this study is pertinent to today's military operations, perhaps more so than at any time since World War II.


message 36: by Colin (new)

Colin Heaton (colin1962) | 1907 comments 'Aussie Rick' wrote: "Here is a new title for those members who love accounts of WW2 special forces and their operations; The Eyes of the Desert Rats:

[bookcover:The Eyes of the Desert Rats: British Long-Range Reconnai..."


read my next book out in May, Four War Boer, which is the life story of the man who trained the South Africa and Commonwealth commandos who served in those areas.


message 37: by Jim (new)

Jim Dingeman (jimkelly) | 86 comments This is a critical look at the LRDG in North Africa...I have read it twice and enjoyed it
THE OTHER DESERT WAR

http://www.amazon.com/The-Other-Deser...


message 38: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Sounds like a great book, thanks for the information Jim.



The Other Desert War British Special Forces in North Africa, 1940-1943 by John W. Gordon by John W. Gordon
Description:
This book traces the history of the Long Range Desert Force and other such units from their origins in World War I and the period before World War II to their spectacular successes and failures against the Germans and Italians in the latter conflict. Along the way, the reader learns of the personalities, bureaucractic impediments, hostile environment and luck that affected British efforts to create and maintain these special forces. This superb volume is both highly informative and entertaining.

Review:
"John W. Gordon's book reveals an impressive mastery of the archival and secondary sources available on this subject. His writing is crisp and interesting, yet sober and scholarly at the same time. The daring and resourceful men of the British desert forces have found a historian whose ability to tell their story matches their ability to create some of the most daring and imaginative operations of World War II. This is an extraordinary book about extraordinary soldiers." - Military Review


message 39: by Ryan (new)

Ryan Wulfsohn | 37 comments 'Aussie Rick' wrote: "Here is a new title for those members who love accounts of WW2 special forces and their operations; The Eyes of the Desert Rats:

[bookcover:The Eyes of the Desert Rats: British Long-Range Reconnai..."


Uh Southern Rhodesians not South Africans.


message 40: by Jim (new)

Jim Dingeman (jimkelly) | 86 comments I have found when reading about special operations in any period you need to mix up the reading completely.

Right now I am looking at a whole series of books on the Jedburghs in France and Western Europe in 1944. These are all secondary works like The Jedburghs The Secret History of the Allied Special Forces, France 1944 by Will Irwin SAS Operation Bulbasket Behind the Lines in Occupied France, 1944 by Paul McCue

Bulbasket was different and was in conjuction with the Jedburghs. I also find it lead me into reading the myriad of books that deal with the politics of occupied France, the resistance and the German counter-intelligence operations.

Then you have all the memoir and I was there literature which is invaluable that must be incorporated into your understanding...this will prepare me for a trip to the NATIONAL ARCHIVES when I take the next step...but special operations can be tied into inter bureaucratic battles, international politics and other factors such as shifting battles and disputes on Allied strategy...and forget the partisan war in Yugoslavia...what a complicated situation to figure out even with all the great resources we have.

this is a great book on the SOE if people can check it out in a research library or get it on inter library loan...the comparable OSS history by Kermit Roosevelt in two volumes is not as good.



The secret history of SOE : Special Operations Executive, 1940-1945 / William Mackenzie.
Published
London : St Ermin's, 2000.
Description
xxix, 814 p. Maps ; 24 cm.

This source is alot of fun to read with livelier secondary accounts of SOE operations and of course the book by MRD Foot


SOE in France An Account of the Work of the British Special Operations Executive in France 1940-1944 by M R D Foot


message 41: by Colin (new)

Colin Heaton (colin1962) | 1907 comments read Aaron Bank's book. He was a Jedburgh man, later created the Green Berets, and I was able to interview him.


message 42: by Jim (new)

Jim Dingeman (jimkelly) | 86 comments Colin wrote: "read Aaron Bank's book. He was a Jedburgh man, later created the Green Berets, and I was able to interview him."

cool...read the book and enjoyed it thoroughly


message 43: by Jim (new)

Jim Dingeman (jimkelly) | 86 comments BTW,

I may have posted this but here is a comprehensive website on the OSS
Operational Groups from WW II...a friend had her late uncle in a Greek OG so I was helping her dig the info out and came across this

http://www.ossog.org


message 44: by Justin (last edited Aug 15, 2013 05:46PM) (new)

Justin | 26 comments I have a major interest in the SAS and LRDG in World War 2, as my father has built a replica Jeep and Chev in desert configuration (see my photo gallery). Both the LRDG and the SAS were incredibly brave, resourceful and tough characters who achieved amazing feats of arms in North Africa, the Meditteranean, France and in the Balkans. I have been reading and collecting books for my father, and here are some rare gems:

Eastern Approaches
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/32...

Kiwi Scorpions - Illustrated account of the New Zealand LRDG units in North Africa
http://www.amazon.com/The-Kiwi-Scorpi...

Sting of the Scorpion
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/12...

Long Range Desert Group
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15...

Long Range Desert Group Patrolman
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/76...

The Long Range Desert Group 1940-1945
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/86...

The SAS in World War 2
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11...

Stirlings Men
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/98...


message 45: by Tytti (new)

Tytti | 140 comments Justin,

there is a lot written about Long Range Reconnaissance Troops, Finnish elite forces. (Or how would you feel about spending days or weeks behind enemy lines, even during the winter?) But this, I guess, is one of the only books in English. Actually Törni wasn't even in those troops, his assignments were somewhat different. But anyway, you might be interested in reading about him. Born A Soldier: The Times And Life Of Larry A Thorne


message 46: by Justin (new)

Justin | 26 comments Tytti wrote: "Justin,

there is a lot written about Long Range Reconnaissance Troops, Finnish elite forces. (Or how would you feel about spending days or weeks behind enemy lines, even during the winter?) But th..."


Hi Tytti,

Looks very interesting! It seems he had an extremely eventful life indeed. You should try and pick up a copy of Eastern Approaches by Fitzroy Maclean. It seems they both had amazing experiences traveling the world and fighting in different theatres.

Eastern Approaches by Fitzroy MacLean


message 47: by Tytti (new)

Tytti | 140 comments Justin wrote: "Tytti wrote: "Justin,

there is a lot written about Long Range Reconnaissance Troops, Finnish elite forces. (Or how would you feel about spending days or weeks behind enemy lines, even during the w..."


I doubt it ends up here, though it might be interesting. I rarely go out of my way to find foreign books, but we do get a lot and the best are translated. But I mostly rely on what our libraries offer. And of course we have a lot of Finnish research that never gets noticed abroad.


message 48: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 559 comments Looks like this is coming out in November:

Merrill's Marauders The Untold History of the Dead End Kids in Unit Galahad, WWII's Bravest Special Forces Unit by Gavin Mortimer
Description:
In August of 1943, a call went out for American soldiers willing to embark on a “hazardous and dangerous mission” behind enemy lines in Burma. The war department wanted 3,000 volunteers, and it didn’t care who they were; they would be expendable, with an expected casualty rate of 85 percent. The men who took up the challenge were, in the words of one, “bums and cast-offs” with rap sheets and reputations for trouble. One war reporter described them as “Dead End Kids,” but by the end of their five-month mission, those that remained had become the legendary “Merrill’s Marauders.” From award-winning historian Gavin Mortimer, Merrill’s Marauders is the story of the American World War II special forces unit originally codenamed “Galahad,” which, in 1944, fought its way through 700 miles of snake-infested Burmese jungle—what Winston Churchill described as “the most forbidding fighting country imaginable.” Though their mission to disrupt Japanese supply lines and communications was ultimately successful, paving the way for the Allied conquest of Burma, the Marauders paid a terrible price for their victory. By the time they captured the crucial airfield of Myitkyina in May 1944, only 200 of the original 3,000 men remained; the rest were dead, wounded, or riddled with disease. This is the definitive nonfiction narrative of arguably the most extraordinary, but also unsung, American special forces unit in World War II.


message 49: by 'Aussie Rick', Moderator (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) | 16966 comments Good add Jerome, thanks.


message 50: by Jerome (new)

Jerome | 559 comments An April release:

Project 9 The Birth of the Air Commandos in World War II by Dennis R. Okerstrom by Dennis R. Okerstrom
Description:
Project 9: The Birth of the Air Commandos in World War II is a thoroughly researched narrative of the Allied joint project to invade Burma by air. Beginning with its inception at the Quebec Conference of 1943 and continuing through Operation Thursday until the death of the brilliant British General Orde Wingate in March 1944, less than a month after the successful invasion of Burma, Project 9 details all aspects of this covert mission, including the selection of the American airmen, the procurement of the aircraft, the joint training with British troops, and the dangerous night-time assault behind Japanese lines by glider.

Based on review of hundreds of documents as well as interviews with surviving Air Commandos, this is the history of a colorful, autonomous, and highly effective military unit that included some of the most recognizable names of the era. Tasked by the General of the Army Air Forces, H. H. “Hap” Arnold, to provide air support for British troops under the eccentric Major General Wingate as they operated behind Japanese lines in Burma, the Air Commandos were breaking entirely new ground in operational theory, tactics, and inter-Allied cooperation. Okerstrom’s in-depth research and analysis in Project 9 shed light on the operations of America’s first foray into special military operations, when these heroes led the way for the formation of modern special operations teams such as Delta Force and Seal Team Six.


« previous 1 3 4
back to top