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Gone with the Wind
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New School Classics- 1900-1999 > Gone With the Wind Chapter 42-End Spoilers

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message 1: by Trisha (new) - added it

Trisha | 492 comments Final stretch! Post your comments here for chapters 42-end!


Karol Finished this awhile ago . . . will check back later to see if there's actually any discussion.

Every time I read this novel, I find that different aspects of it strike me than the last time. And also that I feel differently about many things at each reading.

After reading it this time, I am very interested in reading a non-fiction account of southern reconstruction from a southerner's viewpoint. It's a fascinating topic to me.


Marcie Harkness | 28 comments Loved this book so much! I wonder what happened to Scarlett and Rhett. I know there have been a few books written that try to continue the story. Has anyone read any of them? Do you have a possible recommendation? Perhaps it's just best to leave it untold.


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

Love this book! It's got a permanent place on my shelves, and my To Re-Read List! Scarlett and Rhett are both amazingly well-done characters.


Desertorum Just finished this and really liked it! It was my first time reading it and I haven´t seen the movie (but now I must!) so kind of all new to me. I had really much new information about the war and the lifestyle in that time. Slavery and things related to that (Ku Klux Klan and other things) was told very differently than in my history book in school. I think there are different sides to everything. Greatly written book which left me wondering what is going to happen. I was hoping different kind of ending but this was very suiting actually. "The greatest love story of all time" didn´t have an ending or did, but not the loving one. Makes me sad but I also kind of appreciate it, she didn´t deserve any better. I just wished she would have understood it sooner. But isn´t it said that Margaret Mitchell did meant to write a sequel to this? I think the ending feels like it.
Have anybody read Scarlett? It says that it is sequel to GWTW…but since it´s not by the same author I´m pretty sceptical about it...


Desertorum I don´t remember where I read that she was going to write a sequel but now I read from wiki that that wasn´t the case. So it was suppose to end like that even there was good opening for a sequel.


message 7: by Tytti (last edited Apr 05, 2015 06:35AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Tytti | 1092 comments I'm glad you liked it! I tried reading Scarlett but the writing just doesn't feel the same. I've seen the series but the story feels farfetched. (view spoiler) And yeah, the movie is a must.

When we had the US Civil War in school, I already knew much more about it than anyone else, I had studied it so much. But you can compare it to our civil war, how many sides that has. We haven't even settled on the name of it yet. I was also told by an American that there used to be black slave owners, too. I haven't read about it from anywhere but... It may sound improbable but how many people elsewhere know that Jews served in our army, side-by-side with Germans. But anyway, you have to remember it's a romantized version of the history. I think we might be more prone to believe it, considering that we have lost a couple of wars, too, and everyone knew that the "official" (Soviet/Allied) history wasn't/isn't exactly correct, either, especially when it comes to Estonians. Or maybe it's just me... Then again, listening to the losing side is important, too. Too often the history is written by the victors. I believe the majority of the Southern soldiers weren't slave owners, so they, too, must have had some reason to fight. Also Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation 1863 didn't apply to the border states (states that had slaves but hadn't seceded from the Union) so I think it had more to do with winning the war than the rights of slaves... The history is never so simple. That's why I don't like to make judgments.

I think in the end I loved the ending. It felt real. I haven't since enjoyed love stories that are sure to end "nicely", there has to be some suspense and I can keep making my own stories if the end is open. (I guess I didn't before that, either, I was 12.) That's why I won't read romance novels. (I have learned on GR that the conventions of romance genre demands that there is a HEA, "happily ever after". How boring.) I didn't think of it as "the greatest love story", either, for me it was a story of survival, at least the book. The movie concentrates more on the relationships. But how I loved the characters, I think I adopted some of Scarlett's attitude, about not caring what other people think.

Instead of Scarlett, I would recommend John Jakes' North and South trilogy. Though I haven't found it in Finland, the tv series was great. I think it's the opposite of "a miniseries". :D A bit too much eighties (women had makeup!) and some of the characters are a bit one-sided and there are too many coincidences, but still, it's so well done, at least the first two books. The third was so-so. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3TI4...


Desertorum Yes that what I´m afraid that it doesn´t "feel" the same. I might still try it one day, because I have it in my bookshelf.

I must say that I don´t know much about the US civil war (or other wars except WWII -> only things that came up in school) since I don´t like war things…I am too sensitive and think about them then all the time. Hah! But I do realise that this was fiction and it is not the truth but anyway it made me think that sometimes (or usually) there are many sides to one story. And people might see things very differently. And since it happened long time ago there might be difficulties to get, not somehow altered or coloured truth about things, since it´s always somebody´s idea about the truth? Maybe if you can fix the stories of two sides together and find consistences, those things might be close to the truth. But I also don´t like make judgments. And in this case I don´t have that much information that I would make even opinion about it.

Thank you for the recommendation, I will check it out! :)


Melanti | 2384 comments Gone With the Wind's portrayal of the US antebellum South is extremely romanticized.

Tytti wrote: "I believe the majority of the Southern soldiers weren't slave owners, so they, too, must have had some reason to fight. ..."

There's a good article here: http://www.civilwar.org/education/his...

I went to high school in the north, where we were taught the Civil War was all about ending slavery. Then I went to college in the south, where I was taught that it was all about States' rights. I don't think either explanation really explains the situation all that well.

But once the war DID begin, there certainly wasn't a shortage of reasons for people to join one side or the other. And eventually, there was conscription, so you had to fight whether or not you believed in a particular side.

Tytti wrote: "I was also told by an American that there used to be black slave owners, too..."

Yes. It was relatively rare, but it did happen especially in the earlier days. I even heard of a case or two early on when a black man owned a white indentured servant! Though, of course, by the time of the Civil War, indentured servitude had mostly disappeared.

(It was also the case that some blacks bought lovers/family/friends who weren't able to be freed, for whatever reason, but I'm not counting those cases.)


Tytti | 1092 comments Melanti wrote: "But once the war DID begin, there certainly wasn't a shortage of reasons for people to join one side or the other."

I think it's also just basic psychology or something. You may not always agree what your country/leaders are doing but if an outsider/foreigner tries to force you to something, people will rebel. (This was probably the case of Finnish Communists who fought against the Soviet Union.) And there were people like Robert E. Lee who opposed slavery but fought for the South because he was from Virginia. (I told you I have read a lot about the subject...) Thanks for the article, I'll try to remember to read it.


message 11: by Line (new) - rated it 5 stars

Line deleted user wrote: "Love this book! It's got a permanent place on my shelves, and my To Re-Read List! Scarlett and Rhett are both amazingly well-done characters."

I read "Scarlett" by Alexandra Ripley a few years back. Didn't love it. I prefer to keep the end as it is.

However, it made me interested in the slavery in the US. I can highly recommend the new book by Sue Monk Kidd, "The Invention of Wings".


message 12: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 5 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9559 comments Mod
Yes, Line -- fan-fiction rarely lives up to the original. I've got The Invention of Wings on my TBR list -- it does come highly recommended by several people -- I'll sneak it in.


Luella | 5 comments Karol wrote: "Finished this awhile ago . . . will check back later to see if there's actually any discussion.

Every time I read this novel, I find that different aspects of it strike me than the last time. And ..."


I agree with this too.

I read this book off and on for three years. It had other things going on. I am glad I preserved and now I might watch the movie.

Overall I think that the love story aspect is great. This probably happens to many people all the time in relationships. If people only learned to communicate which is so difficult especially in this digital age they would be much better off than they are now.


message 14: by Cynda (last edited Sep 22, 2018 03:16PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Cynda | 3058 comments Hi Marcie. For years Gone with the Wind was my favorite book. I remember the clamor and the build up to the authorized sequel Scarlett by Alexandra Ripley. She had practiced and practiced writing in the style of Margaret Mitchell. She had studied the characters. Blah. Unmemorable. Somehow dishonest. Rhett Butler was not believable. Rhett said he was done, and he is. IMO Mitchell was right: The story was complete. We can only cry with Scarlett and support her as she continues to build her businesses and finds some happiness elsewhere. (I am still disappointed too.)


Maggie the Muskoka Library Mouse (mcurry1990) One of my favourite books, for sure. I admire Scarlett's tenacity, even if she is a brat. And Rhett? One of my most attractive book boyfriends. ;)


Michele | 1010 comments Ah, Rhett. One of my earliest fictional crushes, right up there with Master Robinton (Dragonsinger) and Prince Gwydion (Chronicles of Prydain) XD I never will understand Scarlett's idiotic obsession with Ashley Wilkes. Foolish girl.


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