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Fifty Shades of Grey (Fifty Shades, #1)
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Book Specific Discussions > Fifty Shades Trilogy

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Sarah | 32 comments After a long drive this afternoon which gave me time to think about this trilogy I wanted to post something about them. I downloaded them to my iPad a few weeks after all the buzz started, but was really reticent to actually delve in and start reading them. Part of that whole book snobbery thing I guess, but it wasn't until some of my friends at work said they had also downloaded them that I decided to jump in. I trust their judgement in books and felt as though they might not be too bad. My threshold for even you basic chick lit can be a little low and if these were going to skew into more of the harlequin romance vibe it wasn't going to be pretty. But I agree with what Ann said in the book snobbery podcast - don't make a judgement about a book until you've tried to read it.
As I am a couple hundred pages into the third one I have to say they are pretty good books. Sure, it has tons of sex, but there is still a pretty good plot. And I don't always like the characters, but, as I heard Meg Wolitzer once say, the point of books isn't for you to love the characters. So I keep reading. And in the middle of the second one I noticed something. Both the first and the second books make a strong parallel to, what most of us would consider, classic novels. The first one relates Ana's development to Tess of the D'ubervilles. In the second you realize that there are correlations between Ana's tale and that of Rebecca by du Marnier. I can't speak of the third one yet, but I'm betting something will pop up.
This brings up another observation. That perhaps these books can open up a world of reading for those who might not ordinarily read books. Similar to the arguments made in favor of Harry Potter and the Twilight series. They sparked a love of reading in a group that might not ordinarily want to read.
And, yes, I am recommending this to my friends and encouraging those who have them to go ahead and start reading them.


message 2: by Ann (new)

Ann (akingman) | 2097 comments Mod
Sarah wrote: "This brings up another observation. That perhaps these books can open up a world of reading for those who might not ordinarily read books. Similar to the arguments made in favor of Harry Potter and the Twilight series. They sparked a love of reading in a group that might not ordinarily want to read. "

Thanks for your observations, Sarah, especially the one above. It is definitely true that this series is leading people who haven't read a book in years to pick it up and start reading.


message 3: by Amy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 463 comments Sarah wrote: "In the second you realize that there are correlations between Ana's tale and that of Rebecca by du Marnier."

Ugh - I hated that book. Hopefully it won't turn me off from this second book (I'm halfway through the 1st right now).


Sarah | 32 comments It won't. I was never able to make it through all of Rebecca. The second book was my favorite.


message 5: by Jessica (thebluestocking) (last edited Jun 04, 2012 09:29PM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Jessica (thebluestocking) (jessicaesq) I was super hesitant to read these books, but the BOTNS episode on it pushed me over the edge. I wanted to be able to weigh in on it when it came up.

I finished the first one a few days ago, and I have to say that it did have some merit. I liked seeing how Twilight inspired it, and I liked the Tess references.

However, the one book was plenty for me, as the sex was a little much. So I hadn't planned on finishing the series. But I really love Rebecca, so I may read the second one at some point.


message 6: by Ann (new)

Ann (akingman) | 2097 comments Mod
OK, you guys have to watch this video. It's Dr. Ruth (remember her?) talking about the series:
http://youtu.be/Qp-5AqNdj1I


message 7: by Pamela (new)

Pamela | 55 comments I've read the trilogy and got to meet E.L. James in Miami, on her first book tour stop. My friends and I cornered her in a hallway and asked her about the similarities to Jane Eyre that we noticed in the books. She said, rather slyly, that she was more inclined to think of "Beauty and the Beast". I wrote an article about the event and her comments - - if you're interested, it's posted at http://stylesubstancesoul.com/2012/05....


Sarah | 32 comments I was thinking there was a link to Jane eyre too!


message 9: by Pamela (new)

Pamela | 55 comments Ann wrote: "OK, you guys have to watch this video. It's Dr. Ruth (remember her?) talking about the series:
http://youtu.be/Qp-5AqNdj1I"


Absolutely classic!!!


Jessica (thebluestocking) (jessicaesq) Ann wrote: "OK, you guys have to watch this video. It's Dr. Ruth (remember her?) talking about the series:
http://youtu.be/Qp-5AqNdj1I"


That is just hilarious. I liked the advice to read parts of it with your significant other, then close it, and make your own story. :)


message 11: by Shona (new)

Shona (anovelobsession) | 178 comments I was completely out of the loop when it came to these particular books. Maybe because I'm living in Germany, but I hadn't heard of the 50 shades trilogy until BOTNs. Then it was like the floodgates opened because then I started hearing and reading about them everywhere. They even showed up at our one American bookstore recently and sold out very quickly. So to jumpon the bandwagon I thought I would see what all the hype was about. I downloaded a free sample to see if I would be interested and read the first chapter or so. I knew from the first few pages that I wouldn't be continuing -- just not my cup of tea I guess, but if these books got people reading, I'm all for that. As much as I really hated the Twilight books, they got my daughter reading. She was always a reluctant reader and had a very hard time sticking with any book until that series came along, now she is an avid reader. To have a book come along that opens that door into a lifetime of reading for someone is a wonderful thing. Just in my own personal heavily biased opinion, I wish that the same kind of frenzy would occur around other books. Wouldn't it be awesome if all of a sudden all everyone was talking about was the fact that Richard Ford or Toni Morrison had a new book out and they couldn't wait to get their hands on it? Just a thought....


message 12: by Amy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Amy | 463 comments Shona wrote: "I knew from the first few pages that I wouldn't be continuing ..."

Shona, I was lamenting the terrible writing in the first couple of chapters. I don't know if I am getting used to it or it gets better, but it isn't quite as bad as you get into it.


message 13: by Pamela (new)

Pamela | 55 comments Amy wrote: "Shona wrote: "I knew from the first few pages that I wouldn't be continuing ..."

Shona, I was lamenting the terrible writing in the first couple of chapters. I don't know if I am getting used to i..."


Shona, I agree with Amy - - and actually, I think the writing gets significantly better in books 2 & 3. However, it is never going to be considered great literature. It is simply great fun and the story actually is intriguing, albeit not realistic; it's a fantasy love story. I'm glad I read the trilogy, and the end of book 3 is very satisfactory.


Leslie I have just started the first book and so far I am struggling with it. I only decided to read it just to see what all the talk and controversy was about.
I am only 50 pages in though. My friends keep insisting it gets better. So far I keep waiting for Chirstain to sprout fangs because it read like a Twilight for adults, LOL. He is very "predator"


message 15: by Chris (new) - rated it 1 star

Chris | 180 comments Leslie wrote: "I have just started the first book and so far I am struggling with it. I only decided to read it just to see what all the talk and controversy was about.
I am only 50 pages in though. My friends ..."


Leslie, I too, kept with this when I didn't want to, because my co-workers kept insisting it got better. IMO, it didn't. I felt like I wasted a few days of good reading time on this, but I'm glad I read it so I finally know what everyone is talking about. I got the thumbnail sketch of books 2 and 3 from a friend to know what happens and I don't feel like I missed anything by not reading them.


message 16: by Pamela (new)

Pamela | 55 comments I am fascinated by all the conversation about these books; I read them and enjoyed them, although I certainly don't consider them good literature. I am more interested in the "phenomenon"; I was talking with a bookseller at a small indie bookstore last night,and she said they are still selling well. The buzz about the movie is also getting bigger and bigger, which will promote even more sales. I'm very curious to see how high sales will go!


Leslie I finished book 1 and I admit I will read the rest just to find out why exactly he is the way he is. I have an inkling of why, but it will be the plot, not the sex, that will keep me reading. I'm not waiting on baited breath either.
I guess I dont' understand what the fuss is about when Anne Rice had her S&M series out so long ago. But then again I was a kid when those came out and didn't discover them until my 20s


message 18: by Dana Marie (new)

Dana Marie (dmluvsprufrock) | 2 comments Ann wrote: "OK, you guys have to watch this video. It's Dr. Ruth (remember her?) talking about the series:
http://youtu.be/Qp-5AqNdj1I"


I've been avoiding these because I downloaded and read the sample on my Kindle and thought that the writing was atrocious. But this video makes me want to try it out! LOL


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