Young Adult Book Reading Challenges discussion

Blood Red Road (Dust Lands, #1)
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Blood Red Road > Women in the Novel

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Tatiana (tatiana_g) In our previous book club pick (The Book of Lost Things), we agreed, most women were not portrayed in a very flattering light. What about in Blood Red Road?


message 2: by Dana (last edited Jun 01, 2012 09:49PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Dana Wallace - Not Enough Books, Not Enough Time (danaaa_99) | 8 comments In The Book of Lost Things, women were seen as evil. In Blood Red Road this is not the case, they are seen as strong people. Sometimes, I am still in the beginning stages of the book, I feel women are portrayed as tragic. Saba's mother died during childbirth. Mercy never found her "heart's desire" and Saba lost her brother, probably the thing she loved most in the world. But that's my first impression of women in this book. : )


Tatiana (tatiana_g) What I like about Blood Red Road is how many courageous, strong women it has. These women are never submissive to or dependent on men. They are self-sufficient and able and equal partners to men. One gets tired of books where women are constantly abused and victimized (like, let's say, Wither).


Grace (gdaminato) | 520 comments Tatiana wrote: "What I like about Blood Red Road is how many courageous, strong women it has. These women are never submissive to or dependent on men. They are self-sufficient and able and equal partners to men."

I agree with you on this. The women also command the respect of the men around them. I don't remember anyone condescending to Saba or treating her with contempt because she was a woman. Everyone she encountered seen to recognize and respect her strength.

The main characters also respect Emmi and her abilities. It's true she's mistreated by Miz Pinch and the King but that arose from their need to use her as a lever against Saba not because she's a girl or to exploit her weaknesses.


Randie D. Camp, M.S. (randie87) | 9 comments I also agree. The women in this book are strong and smart. The men are the ones presented in an evil light...only a handful seem to be good.


message 6: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
I love the women in this book. Except for Emmi. She just seemed to whine all the time and never listen to anyone. She was the reason a lot of drama happened to everyone.
The Free Hawks also really impressed me. I like that there is a group of women who are strong stick together and fight. Though I wonder if men are strictly not allowed in the group and if one wants to date then what happens?


message 7: by Theo (last edited Jun 28, 2012 09:26PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Theo | 116 comments I have to say that I thought Emmi was remarkably strong for her age and situation. She never had a mother, her father checked out of his role because of his grief and her older sister doesn't like her at all. All she has is Lugh, and because of this and the fact that she is 9 years old she wants to rescue him and thinks she is capable of doing it.

I think Miz Pinch could go up against any of the evil female characters from The Book of Lost Things. In fact, she reminded me of the Snow White character in that novel.

I do agree, though, that this was a nice change of pace from the portrayal of females in Wither, which was not my favorite.


message 8: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
Well I guess that is true about Emmi. But I really want to see that she has learned some lessons in the next book. Like listen to directions!


Tatiana (tatiana_g) I actually quite liked Emmi too. She is one brave girl, in spite of all the diversity.


*Layali* (layalireads) | 94 comments I wanted to strangle Miz Pinch! And her son!


Karen | 1 comments I really liked Blood Red Road, because it was interesting, but what really appealed to me was the concept of an awesome kick-ass heroine. Saba was fierce and ruthless, a trait hard to find in many YA fiction novels.


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