Young Adult Book Reading Challenges discussion

Blood Red Road (Dust Lands, #1)
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Blood Red Road > First Impressions (No spoilers, please)

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Tatiana (tatiana_g) Now that you started reading the novel, how do you feel about the dialect it is written in? Is it distracting or does it add extra "flavor" to the story? What do you think of the story so far?


David Estes (davidestesbooks) At first I was highly distracted and wasn't sure I'd like it but by page 10 i was used to it and thought if was so clever. By the end I was in love with the book!!


Kyle (livingisreading) Never found it distracting, and definitely added "flavor" to the story. Made the idea of this wasteland society seem more realistic (since I'm not going to believe a society with no form of education is going to spell words correctly and have proper grammar).


Karli (yapagemaster) I have not started to read the book yet, but I'm about to. I was originally planning on skipping this book, but my sister has a copy and has read it and she said it was one of her favorite books. So, with that I plan to join in on this months reading and I'm looking forward to it. :)


Tatiana (tatiana_g) The dialect didn't disturb me at all either. It was just conversational. And now that I am listening to it on audio it is barely noticeable at all.


David Estes (davidestesbooks) Eevee wrote: "I have not started to read the book yet, but I'm about to. I was originally planning on skipping this book, but my sister has a copy and has read it and she said it was one of her favorite books. S..."

Yay, definitely read it, I think you'll love it!!


Kcee | 5 comments i enjoyed the story but the dialect was such a turn off. i hard a hard time sticking with the book because of it. However a coworker (at a bookstore) of mine said she never noticed and looked at the book when i commented to see how it was written. It seems like if you can get thru the first chapter without it being annoying then your set for the book. If its grating on you already...


message 8: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
Waiting to get my copy from the library!


Dana Wallace - Not Enough Books, Not Enough Time (danaaa_99) | 8 comments I had to read the book outloud at first to get the dialect and I didn't like how their were no quotation marks but by now I'm used to it and I think it suits the story : )


message 10: by Boyanna (last edited Jun 04, 2012 05:39AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Boyanna | 29 comments English is not my native language and this book ruined all the hard work i put in perfecting it, but i like it none-the-less.
Saba is one of my favorite heroins so far, she is such a bad-ass.


David Estes (davidestesbooks) So true Zozee, she's awesome!!


message 12: by may (new) - rated it 5 stars

may (mayriella) I read it few days ago and I'm definitely in love with this book, became one of my favourite dysto/postap so far. Saba is the incarnation of the modern and strong woman/heroin.
English isn't my native language and to my surprise the dialect didn't bother me at all.


David Estes (davidestesbooks) Awesome Marion, seems like everyone likes this book :)


Chantaal Kyle wrote: "Never found it distracting, and definitely added "flavor" to the story. Made the idea of this wasteland society seem more realistic (since I'm not going to believe a society with no form of education is going to spell words correctly and have proper grammar). "

Agreed, Kyle! I think that was what made me get over my initial reaction to the dialect, same as I had when I started The Knife of Never Letting Go. I think the dialect adds more depth and helps flesh out the culture a lot more. World building is my favorite, favorite thing when it comes to books in this genre, and the dialect helps it a lot.


message 15: by Karo (last edited Jun 04, 2012 04:00AM) (new) - rated it 3 stars

Karo While I see and understand the author's motifs for using a dialect, I had some trouble with it, tbh. I think the main problem is that I'm not a native English-speaker. I've been learning English for many years and I usually don't have any trouble getting through a book written in English.
With this book though, my mind constantly tried to correct the spelling and grammar (...and I think this is probably even worse for a non-native speaker because a non-native speaker usually tries very hard to make it right and use the correct grammar and spelling.) So it took me really long to get into some kind of reading flow because of all the corrections going on in my head *lol*


Grace (gdaminato) | 520 comments I didn't have a problem with the dialect. I thought it just added to the atmosphere. It's mild compared to the language used in A Clockwork Orange or Riddley Walker, Expanded Edition.

I haven't been able to devote all my reading time to this book so I'm just at the very beginning. I love the mood evoked by the description of Saba's home and the bits of the world you see in the first few chapters. I especially like the fact that the time and place is undetermined - at least as far as I've read in the book. In my mind, the book could be set in North America in the 18th or 19th century; or it could be set in the future after an apocalyptic collapse of civilization; or it could be set on another planet. It could be anywhere.


Tatiana (tatiana_g) Karolina wrote: "While I see and understand the author's motifs for using a dialect, I had some trouble with it, tbh. I think the main problem is that I'm not a native English-speaker. I've been learning English fo..."

English is not my first language either, so I understand your frustration. But a lot of best books are written using a dialect or accents. I believe, in a long run this won't be an effort wasted to take on this challenge.


message 18: by Amber (new) - rated it 1 star

Amber (jubilantdusk) | 14 comments I found the book very hard to get in to. The dialect was a little too overdone which was distracting for me.


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

The dialect was overdone at the start but once I got into the plot, I enjoyed reading the dialect.


Annalisa (goodreadsannalisa) I've read the first chapter and am a little dubious, but every one seems to love it so I'll probably keep going.


*Layali* (layalireads) | 94 comments I wasn't expecting the dialogue at all when I first began this book, but now I think it adds character. This also isn't a book that I would usually pick up off the shelf, but I'm really getting into it and so happy that it is the monthly read!


message 22: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
The dialogue bothered me at the very beginning. I kept reading the word jest like as if someone was making a joke. Then after about 5 pages of reading jest I realized she was saying just. To be honest I just started saying the words correctly in my head. So in my head git was get.

It is interesting to me though... (even though we don't know the time frame from the Wreckers to the present time in the book) how much the language deteriorates. Even today we speak so differently then 200 years ago in America. It's like when I read a Jane Austin book... sometimes I have to look up the words since we don't really talk like that anymore.


Grace (gdaminato) | 520 comments Angie wrote: "It is interesting to me though... how much the language deteriorates. "

I'm going to disagree with you on this. I don't think this shows that the language has deteriorated at all - it just expresses how an uneducated person speaks. I think you'll find people today who sound just like Saba writes - git for get, jest for just, an for and, etc. I think you'll find little difference between the dialect used here and the dialogue in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

If you want to see how language might deteriorate after a civilization-destroying holocaust, take a look at Russell Hoban's Riddley Walker, Expanded Edition.


message 24: by Theo (new) - rated it 5 stars

Theo | 116 comments I'm just starting it today, so I'm a little late, but the month is not over yet! I have to say that the dialect seems very natural to me, but that might be because I grew up in the rural South. I hear the voices of the people I grew up around when I'm reading.


message 25: by Angie, YA lovin mod!! (new) - rated it 3 stars

Angie | 2687 comments Mod
OH yea... we discuss the books till the end of the month. Actually the book threads never close. So you can always discuss them!


Annalisa (goodreadsannalisa) The only thing about the dialect that bothered me was "an" for "and." There were a lot of sentences I had to reread because I kept expecting it to be the article "an" and not the conjunction "and" so they wouldn't make sense to me.


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