The Witch of Blackbird Pond The Witch of Blackbird Pond discussion


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Sentimentality and the appreciation of culture in New England/North America

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message 1: by Nina (last edited Aug 25, 2016 11:22AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Nina I keep thinking that I got to read some of the best books (including this one) while I lived in New England, and I actually had people to discuss them with. I currently live in South Florida and while I could still find books and people to discuss them with, the appreciation of it is not the same. In New England things like persecution of women and men believed to be witches actually happened and people embrace the knowledge and make up for the persecutions a hundred times over by being much more accepting and understanding of other cultures and lifestyles. In the south it's not really like that at all. I've found myself wondering sometimes if anyone else feels this way? I'd love to hear your responses. Thanks for reading this.


message 2: by [deleted user] (new)

You live in the South.

That's where the Ku Klux Klan, the Rebel Yell, and the most racist flag in American history live.

It's NOT where acceptance, understanding, and "live and let live" live.

Get thee to a college town or get out while you still like brown people.


message 3: by Kristin (last edited Aug 25, 2016 11:32AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kristin I think that a person's perspective (on life, on books, on education, etc) is determined in part by where they live or lived. I grew up in Pennsylvania and probably don't feel the same about the persecutions as you do.

I say seek out more people to discuss the book with. As a group Southerners may feel very differently but individuals may be more open minded.


Catherine deleted user wrote: "You live in the South.

That's where the Ku Klux Klan, the Rebel Yell, and the most racist flag in American history live.

It's NOT where acceptance, understanding, and "live and let live" live.

G..."


I would just like to clear this up. I live in the South, was born and raised there, and nobody has uttered the Rebel Yell that I can recall. The KKK is no longer popular as far as I know. And, how in the world is our flag racist???

Nina, I agree with Kristin. A person's perspective on everything is determined by where they grew up and how they were raised. In New England, the witch persecution is still a big deal. In Germany and Austria, it is illegal to deny that the Holocaust occurred. Here in the sunny South, slavery is a sore spot, thus making us more sensitive to the topic, if that makes any sense at all.


Kristin, Southerners as a group do tend to be stereotyped as one way or another, some not so good, but many individuals that I know do not fall into the negative stereotypes.


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