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Gone with the Wind
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New School Classics- 1900-1999 > Gone with the Wind NO Spoilers

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message 1: by Trisha (new) - added it

Trisha | 492 comments Post your comments for GwtW here. I have seen the movie quite a few times, but I don't think that I have ever read the book. I do recall starting it a few times though...


Marcie Harkness | 28 comments This is one of my all time favorite books. I'm so excited to read it again!


message 3: by Mercedes (new)

Mercedes (mercysbookishmusings) | 2 comments I was just going to start reading this solo so i'm glad I'll have you guys to discuss it with :) I've never read it before but I love the film.


Judy Olson | 18 comments I had seen the movie many times, and loved it. Absolutely loved the book, its on my top 10 list. Are you breaking it into a schedule of sorts?


message 5: by Trisha (new) - added it

Trisha | 492 comments That's a good idea, it is a little lengthy. Let me take a look and see how best to break it up!


Laura (laura-wise) | 1 comments This is great. I'm about halfway through right now. Looking forward to the discussion.


Kristen | 37 comments Yay! I'm excited to see this group read. I'm on page 643 right now and love this book......and I've never seen the movie so that will be a great treat at the end. Looking forward to the discussion!


message 8: by Trisha (new) - added it

Trisha | 492 comments Hey all, I just broke down the discussion into 3 different segments, that way people can post comments without giving away too many spoilers. Happy reading!


Nathan | 421 comments I'm about 22% through. Reading it for the first time. I've never seen the movie either. I'm really liking Margaret Mitchell's writing.

Anyone else reading it now?


Claire Yes, I'm reading it at the moment. I've never seen the film either so I have no idea of the story.

It's a fascinating book, Scarlett is just such a selfish person. I'm about 70% through and really enjoying it.


message 11: by Maarit (new)

Maarit | 285 comments I'm also reading it at the moment, though I'm only in the beginning. I've seen parts of the movie (and the ending) long ago, so I have some kind of a picture what is going to happen in the book later on, but it's still an enjoyable read.


Tytti | 1092 comments I read it as a child but I might have some thoughts about it. I even have the book in English.

Claire, I think Scarlett is a selfish person but her actions often suggest otherwise.


message 13: by Shelley (new)

Shelley | 53 comments I'm always so torn by the book. Turning the pages is like eating potato chips, and I admire the unabashed feminist heroine.

But the racism in it is enough to make you gag.

Shelley
http://dustbowlstory.wordpress.com


message 14: by Sam (new) - rated it 3 stars

Sam (aramsamsam) | 318 comments Shelley wrote: "I'm always so torn by the book. Turning the pages is like eating potato chips, and I admire the unabashed feminist heroine.

But the racism in it is enough to make you gag.

Shelley
http://dustbowl..."


I've heard this now from several readers.
Haven't started the book yet, I hope to join you guys in May. Hopefully I can catch up!


message 15: by Shelley (new)

Shelley | 53 comments Sam, just adding a note. Pat Conroy has a book of essays out about his life as a reader, which I just got. I loved what he said about Thomas Wolfe, but in reading Conroy's essay on Gone With The Wind (a book he adores, for several good reasons) I was blindsided by the fact that he totally ignores the insulting treatment of African Americans in the book. Like what you will about the novel, someone just can't write an essay about it and pretend that isn't there.

Shelley
http://dustbowlstory.wordpress.com


message 16: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 5 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9712 comments Mod
Shelley wrote: "Sam, just adding a note. Pat Conroy has a book of essays out about his life as a reader, which I just got. I loved what he said about Thomas Wolfe, but in reading Conroy's essay on Gone With The Wi..."

I love Pat Conroy, can you link the book you are referring to?


message 17: by Laurie (new) - added it

Laurie | 1676 comments I just finished GWTW and I loved it. It isn't easy to read some of the parts with the nasty attitudes and treatment of African Americans, but the reader always has to keep in mind the historical era of the novel. So it would be unrealistic to read about modern attitudes in a book about the civil war. Even the northern women in the book don't like black people, so it wasn't just southerners who had deplorable views of black people.

I am southern and it makes me ashamed even today that people had those attitudes, but it doesn't diminish my enjoyment of Margaret Mitchell's story or her wonderful characters. Now I want to watch the movie again which I haven't seen in many years.


Kathy,
I think I read the book last year that Shelley is referring to by Pat Conroy, My Reading Life. It was the first book I've ever read by him and it was very interesting.


message 18: by Katy, New School Classics (last edited May 18, 2015 07:07PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9712 comments Mod
Thanks Laurie!

It has been a while since I have read GWTW, but I've read it several times and always enjoyed it; flaws & all.


message 19: by Pink (new)

Pink | 6554 comments Laurie, I think you've summed GWTW up very well, I haven't read it yet and I am concerned that the racist attitudes will spoil my enjoyment of it. I don't generally mind reading about these issues in older books, as they depict views of the time, which we can't go back and change, however bad they seem to us now. I haven't seen the whole film either, just bits and pieces of it over the years.


message 20: by Laurie (new) - added it

Laurie | 1676 comments I will admit that there was one chapter that I found more difficult to read, not because of violence toward the former slaves but because of the attitude of black people having a child's mentality. But this is nothing like reading Toni Morrison's Beloved which depicts truly violent and horrible treatment of slaves.


Melanti | 2384 comments I found the casual racism in Gone With the Wind harder to take than the violence in Beloved.

Morrison wrote from the point of view of "Yes, we all know this was wrong", where Mitchell writes from the "What? Racism? No, what makes you think that?!" point of view.

Of course, they're two wildly different authors with wildly different goals.


But once I got to the end and looked back on the book as a whole, Scarlett's story was so strong that the racist parts didn't stand out nearly as much as they did while I was reading it.


message 22: by Laurie (new) - added it

Laurie | 1676 comments Mitchell and Morrison also wrote in very different time periods. Mitchell wrote in Georgia during 1930s which was a world of segregation and Jim Crow laws. I don't know her personal views of minorities, but the views of many southerners had not changed all that much in the years since Reconstruction. So the two authors viewpoints and goals stem from very different lives.


message 23: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 5 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9712 comments Mod
It's been many years since I last read this book. I've enjoyed it each time, but I agree that the attitude towards black people is very off-putting.


message 24: by Bob, Short Story Classics (new) - rated it 5 stars

Bob | 5017 comments Mod
As bad as Scarlett was I remember even she was shocked and disgusted at the northerner’s language and attitude towards Blacks, especially from solders wives. It must have been hard to shock a woman capable or stealing her sisters fiancé. Oh, here is the perfect chance for me to use a new word from another thread. Ashley was a first class milksop. Love must be blind for a woman as tough as Scarlett to waste one second on that (here it is again) milksop.


message 25: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 5 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9712 comments Mod
LOL


message 26: by Katy, New School Classics (new) - rated it 5 stars

Katy (kathy_h) | 9712 comments Mod
For more discussion on this book you can read the Buddy Read Discussion

Beware that Buddy Reads will contain spoilers


message 27: by Luella (last edited Jul 29, 2017 12:37PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Luella | 5 comments So far I've had to read it a chapter at a time to get through it. Overall the Civil War era is not a subject I am super interested in. Last year I read Uncle Tom's Cabin with the group so that filled in the background a bit more for me on this one.

I'm a third of the way through the book an under the impression Scarlett could have really used a copy of He's Just Not That Into You: The No-Excuses Truth to Understanding Guys to deal with some of her issues.

Before reading the book I wondered what made the movie and the book so beloved considering the time period and the war in the background and everything, now that I'm reading it I still don't get it so far I haven't seen much that makes me enamored with it. But we will see. I still have many pages to go.

I am hoping to finish the book by the end of the summer and watch the movie and then be done with this one, another check mark on the classics I should probably read list.


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