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Objectivism Terms

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message 1: by Ilyn (new)

Ilyn Ross (Ilyn_Ross) | 538 comments Mod
Second-hander

A [second-hander:] is one who regards the consciousness of other men as superior to his own and to the facts of reality. It is to a [second-hander:] that the moral appraisal of himself by others is a primary concern which supersedes truth, facts, reason, logic. The disapproval of others is so shatteringly terrifying to him that nothing can withstand its impact within his consciousness; thus he would deny the evidence of his own eyes and invalidate his own consciousness for the sake of any stray charlatan’s moral sanction. It is only a [second-hander:] who could conceive of such absurdity as hoping to win an intellectual argument by hinting: “But people won’t like you!”

- “The Argument from Intimidation,” The Virtue of Selfishness, 141.

Men were taught to regard second-handers—tyrants, emperors, dictators—as exponents of egoism. By this fraud they were made to destroy the ego, themselves and others. The purpose of the fraud was to destroy the creators. Or to harness them. Which is a synonym.

From the beginning of history, the two antagonists have stood face to face: the creator and the second-hander. When the first creator invented the wheel, the first second-hander responded. He invented altruism.

The creator—denied, opposed, persecuted, exploited—went on, moved forward and carried all humanity along on his energy. The second-hander contributed nothing to the process except the impediments. The contest has another name: the individual against the collective.

“The Soul of an Individualist,” For the New Intellectual, 83.

More: http://www.aynrandlexicon.com/lexicon...


message 2: by Ilyn (new)

Ilyn Ross (Ilyn_Ross) | 538 comments Mod
The “stolen concept” fallacy, first identified by Ayn Rand, is the fallacy of using a concept while denying the validity of its genetic roots, i.e., of an earlier concept(s) on which it logically depends.

- Leonard Peikoff, editor’s footnote to Ayn Rand’s “Philosophical Detection,”
Philosophy: Who Needs It, 22.


message 3: by Ilyn (new)

Ilyn Ross (Ilyn_Ross) | 538 comments Mod
Anti-Conceptual Mentality

The main characteristic of this mentality is a special kind of passivity: not passivity as such and not across-the-board, but passivity beyond a certain limit—i.e., passivity in regard to the process of conceptualization and, therefore, in regard to fundamental principles. It is a mentality which decided, at a certain point of development, that it knows enough and does not care to look further. What does it accept as “enough”? The immediately given, directly perceivable concretes of its background . . .

To grasp and deal with such concretes, a human being needs a certain degree of conceptual development, a process which the brain of an animal cannot perform. But after the initial feat of learning to speak, a child can counterfeit this process, by memorization and imitation. The anti-conceptual mentality stops on this level of development—on the first levels of abstractions, which identify perceptual material consisting predominantly of physical objects—and does not choose to take the next, crucial, fully volitional step: the higher levels of abstraction from abstractions, which cannot be learned by imitation. (See my book Introduction to Objectivist Epistemology.) . . .

The anti-conceptual mentality takes most things as irreducible primaries and regards them as “self-evident.” It treats concepts as if they were (memorized) percepts; it treats abstractions as if they were perceptual concretes. To such a mentality, everything is the given: the passage of time, the four seasons, the institution of marriage, the weather, the breeding of children, a flood, a fire, an earthquake, a revolution, a book are phenomena of the same order. The distinction between the metaphysical and the man-made is not merely unknown to this mentality, it is incommunicable.

More: http://www.aynrandlexicon.com/lexicon...


message 4: by Ilyn (new)

Ilyn Ross (Ilyn_Ross) | 538 comments Mod
From my second novel, Royal Serf:

The Mike Milken Admiration Party salutes the uncommon man. A man of integrated body and soul, the uncommon man esteems his own mind and values happiness. He respects himself no matter how poor he may be and endeavors to rise to the greatest heights. He takes pride in work and achievement. He glories in pursuits of genius and happiness. He reveres Liberty.


message 5: by Ilyn (new)

Ilyn Ross (Ilyn_Ross) | 538 comments Mod
Excellent - Kudos and thank you to Mr. Craig Biddle

http://newmedia.ufm.edu/gsm/index.php...?


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