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Carole Cummings
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message 1: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments *


message 2: by Kaje (last edited Apr 30, 2012 10:08PM) (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Our May Featured Author is Carole Cummings. Carole is the author of several highly acclaimed fantasy novels.

Carole lives with her husband and family in Pennsylvania, USA, where she spends her time trying to find time to write. Recipient of various amateur writing awards, several of her short stories have been translated into Spanish, German, Chinese and Polish.

Author of the Aisling and Wolf's-own series, Carole is currently in the process of developing several other works, including more short stories than anyone will ever want to read, and novels that accidentally turn into series when she's not looking.

Carole is an avid reader of just about anything that's written well and has good characters. She is a lifelong writer of the 'movies' that run constantly in her head. Surprisingly, she does manage sleep in there somewhere, and though she is rumored to live on coffee and Pixy Stix™, no one has as yet suggested she might be more comfortable in a padded room. Well, not to her face.

For our group read we will be reading Aisling – Guardian Guardian (Aisling, #1) by Carole Cummings. This book is the first in a truly wonderful trilogy of fantasy and m/m romance.

This thread is for general discussion with the author. A separate thread for the book discussion can be found here


message 3: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments So welcome to the YA LGBT books group, Carole. We look forward to hearing more about your writing.


message 4: by Sammy Goode (new)

Sammy Goode | 5363 comments Welcome Carole!! So nice to have you here!


message 5: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Hi Kaje, Hi Sammy. :) Thanks for having me, and I look forward to 'meeting' anyone who drops by.

Thanks for the kind words!

xoxo


message 6: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Hi Carole! I love your Aisling trilogy, so I'm looking forward to seeing other members discover it.


message 7: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Kaje wrote: "Hi Carole! I love your Aisling trilogy, so I'm looking forward to seeing other members discover it."

Aw, thanks, Kaje.

Sooooooo... would this be a bad time to whine about how the world is severely lacking more Tony and Mac? ;)


message 8: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Carole wrote: "Kaje wrote: "Hi Carole! I love your Aisling trilogy, so I'm looking forward to seeing other members discover it."

Aw, thanks, Kaje.

Sooooooo... would this be a bad time to whine about how the world is severely lacking more Tony and Mac? ;) ..."


Book three is in editing - getting there.


message 9: by John (new)

John Goode | 156 comments Hi Carole, welcome to the hot seat :) Here are some lightning round questions for ya!

1. What was the first book that made you want to write?
2. What was the first thing you've written that you went, hey that didn't suck?
3. What is the one story you have yet to write but know you want to?
4. If a popular author came to you sand said "I am giving up this universe, but I want you to continue it...what would it be and why?

And welcome to the clubhouse.


message 10: by Carole (last edited May 04, 2012 06:46PM) (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Hi, John. Thanks for the welcome and the great questions.

1. What was the first book that made you want to write?

Hmm. Well, I’d actually have to say that it was the books that weren’t around that made me want to write. It was more like, ‘I want to read something like ____ and no one’s writing things like that.’ Probably the book that had the biggest effect on me as a kid was The Lord of the Rings. I was about ten when I read it and it totally blew me away. And it continues to blow me away every time I re-read it and I find new nuances, or look at something I thought I knew but discover I didn’t quite get like I thought I did because I hadn’t yet had the necessary life experiences.

Anyway, one of the reasons it affected me the way it did was because I thought Frodo got a bum deal. I mean, the guy went through hell for the love of his people and his home, and then he ended up having to leave it. It killed me, so I ended up writing my first epic—and by ‘epic’ I mean filling a looseleaf binder with my 10-yr-old scribbling prose—about a young kid who saved his village from magical dogs (hey, shut up, I was 10) and the whole village threw him a huge party and gave him a parade, and he was thereafter known as The Hero of Horvey’s Loch (which was my clever way of disguising my hometown of Harvey’s Lake).

So, I guess the answer would be LOTR, but probably not in the way you meant. ;)

2. What was the first thing you've written that you went, hey that didn't suck?

Ha! I love that question. I always think everything I write sucks, and then I think it doesn’t, and then I think it does, and then I think… you see where I’m going. But the first thing I wrote that I was actually excited to share with someone else (meaning one of the first things I allowed out of my desperate clutches to be viewed by eyes other than mine) was a creative writing assignment in 10th grade Mythology (an English elective) that I took a little too far. We were supposed to write three paragraphs about the hubris behind the fall of Icarus, and I ended up writing a twelve page vignette from Icarus’s POV. I kind of panicked at the last minute and was going to take an incomplete instead of turning it in, but my teacher pried it out of my sweaty fingers and then… boggled. He was the first person who told me I was good at this.

3. What is the one story you have yet to write but know you want to?

I’ve got several going at the moment, but probably the one I want to write and maybe won’t is a continuation of the four part series that’s in the process of publishing now. There’s a lot more to that story, but I’m not sure I’ll ever be able to make myself go back into that world. I want to, but being in the headspace of the MC just about did me in, so it’ll have to wait until I’m in a better, more removed place in my own head. Or, you know, forever.

4. If a popular author came to you sand said "I am giving up this universe, but I want you to continue it...what would it be and why?

Ooooooh… Good one. Can I pick two? I’m picking two.

My first pick would be Tolkien, just because he left so many tools just lying around for future builders, and they’re collecting dust. His world was so layered and detailed—people could play in his sandbox for years and never run out of room for more castles.

The second would be Lois McMaster Bujold’s Vorkosigan universe. Again, it’s the world and all its possibilities. She’s got an entire Nexus going, and really intriguing civilizations to populate it. I’d love to watch Barrayar change and evolve, and I’d love to watch Miles’s descendents reap the benefits of the groundwork he’s laid for those changes. And I’d really love to see what the history books end up saying about him.

That was kinda fun. So do I get to know what the clubhouse password is? ;)


message 11: by Kaje (last edited May 04, 2012 07:52PM) (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Ooh, if you do Vorkosigan I want to watch!! Love Miles, and I want to see him as a grandfather, and Ivan totally needs to quit phoning it in out of laziness and a quaddie needs to take on Barrayaran high society... yeah, good one.

And I totally hear you about Tolkien - as a kid I actually did a rewrite of the ending where Sam went with Frodo (even then I wanted to keep guys together, I guess. Rosie? Who's Rosie?) Yours is more creative though - I love the parade. (Frodo should have totally gotten a parade.)


message 12: by [deleted user] (new)

Hi Carole, welcome to GR :)

I'm relatively new to the genre (a late bloomer some may say), so I'm always excited to see Featured Authors for me to acquaint myself with.


message 13: by Carole (last edited May 05, 2012 03:53PM) (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments @Kaje--Ooooh, Miles as a grandfather! Yeesh, I was feeling kind of cheated with CryoBurn because I couldn't wait to see some domestic scenes with Miles and his kids, and I got bubkiss. I'm still pouting. But OMG, how about if Ivan shocked the Counts by bringing home a Betan herm? *evil grin* Oh, the possibilities!

Yeah, I have no illusions I could do it better than--or even equal to--LMB, but wouldn't it be fun to play in that 'verse with those characters? If I wrote fanfic, I'd totally be writing about Miles over-planning the twins' first b-day party. A live zoo with every creature of the Nexus represented? Fireworks gone awry? Just imagine the absurdly fun mess he could make of it all! The mind boggles.

I think a lot of people re-wrote the end of LOTR--at least in their heads. I know I did. Stephen King once said his quest stories are an effort to bring Frodo back from the Havens. I think, somewhere down deep in all of my stories, I'm trying to make it so he never had to go.

@Graham--Hiya, and thanks so much for stopping in and keeping me company. :) Do you read Fantasy at all?


message 14: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Carole wrote: "@Kaje--Ooooh, Miles as a grandfather! Yeesh, I was feeling kind of cheated with CryoBurn because I couldn't wait to see some domestic scenes with Miles and his kids, and I got bubkiss. ...If I wrote fanfic, I'd totally be writing about Miles over-planning the twins' first b-day party. A live zoo with every creature of the Nexus represented? Fireworks gone awry? Just imagine the absurdly fun mess he could make of it all! The mind boggles...."

Love that image. And speaking of cheated, 100 words for those emotional moments? I grant you a near-perfect 100, but still. I'd love Ivan with a herm. His mother would faint.

So would you write your own SF? I've done fantasy, but I'm not sure I'm up to the extra demands of making SF plausible, starting from scratch.


message 15: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments And speaking of cheated, 100 words for those emotional moments?

Yes. Exactly. That's one of the very few nitpicks I have with LMB--I think she shies away from the meat of high emotion. I mean, that's not the point of her books, I get that, but when you run headlong into it in the process of telling a story, it's a little bit of a cheat to gloss over it the way she does. (Now, granted, that may come from the fact that I'm a huge sucker for h/c and she never, ever gives me the "c" part of it. *grumbles*)

So would you write your own SF?

Heh. I doubt it. And if I did, I'd still label it "Fantasy" because science would not be the point, it would be a tool with which to tell the story. Even made up science has to make sense in SF--it has to be logical and plausible, and if it's not, you're going to piss off a whole lot of SF purists.

For instance, the last world I wrote has six moons and two suns. It's not just atmosphere--all of these heavenly bodies are intrinsic to the world and the story. The laws of physics say that it's probably not possible for a world like that to function and support life. So if that had been SF instead of F, I would have had to completely change not only the world but the entire basis of the story. And I'm not willing to do that.

Now, I've got a story brewing now that deals with a current theory in scientific circles that proposes the possibility of legitimate parallel universes. If that story somehow manages to stay within the bounds of that theory when I'm through with it, I'll likely label it SF, but if it doesn't, it'll be unapologetic Fantasy.

I've done fantasy,,,

*perks* Oh? Which one? Never mind, I'll go look! :D


message 16: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Carole wrote: "And speaking of cheated, 100 words for those emotional moments?

Yes. Exactly. That's one of the very few nitpicks I have with LMB--I think she shies away from the meat of high emotion. I mean, tha..."


Most of my fantasy is unpublished so don't go searching too far. I think the freebie "Within Reach" that is on my blog is the only published one. I have a short submitted to Storm Moon Press that might come out. I write a lot that hasn't been published.

I don't know if you could have a double-sun system with a habitable planet. (The moons are no problem.) It's not impossible offhand, but yes, working out the orbits and how the whole thing would work becomes unnecessary for Fantasy and you don't have to make changes to fit the laws of physics so SF is harder. (As Scotty says, "Ye canna change the laws of physics, Jim." Although speaking of fantasy masquerading as SF...)


message 17: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments So this parallel-universes book - stand alone or a new series, do you think?


message 18: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Kaje wrote: "So this parallel-universes book - stand alone or a new series, do you think?"

*sigh* Well, considering how, when I started writing Wolf's-own, I thought it would be a nice little short about a pretty ninja, and it turned into 550K words over four books, I'm not sure I should answer that question. But at the moment, I'm thinking novella, tops. We shall see.


message 19: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Carole wrote: "Kaje wrote: "So this parallel-universes book - stand alone or a new series, do you think?"

*sigh* Well, considering how, when I started writing Wolf's-own, I thought it would be a nice little shor..."


Uh-huh. Been there, got the series. I'm not complaining either way.


message 20: by LenaLena (new)

LenaLena (Marilenalena) | 2 comments Oh! Can I jump in? I'd love to talk Vorkosiverse with one of my favorite authors!

Did you know there's an Ivan book coming out later this year? Captain Vorpatril's Alliance is a romcom, supposedly. Probably too much to hope it'll be Betan Herm, though.

That is my biggest bone to pick with LMB (not a h/c fan myself, so I am fine just sticking with the hurt, lol): she's very baby-centric. I don't think she has any problems with the alphabet soup, some of her secondary characters are gay (Vorruyter, Ethan of Athos), bisexual (Aral), transgender (Dona/Dono) and of course the hermafrodites, but the main characters always need to end up making babies in backwards Barrayar, so we end up with all these heterosexual pairings and babies.

I was a little disappointed in Cryoburn too. I don't particularly want to see Miles with his kids (have enough kids of my own, thank you), but I want to see him scrambling. So I guess he wasn't hurt enough for my taste. That sounds more dubious than I mean it, I am not that blood thirsty, really.

The 100 word drabbles were absolutely fantastic though.


message 21: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Hi, Marleen!

Did you know there's an Ivan book coming out later this year?

I did know about it, and I'll have it in my hot little hands as soon as it's out. From what I understand, it takes place about two years prior to CryoBurn, so yeah, if there had been a Betan herm in the mix, I'm sure there would have been at least a few wry Miles-thoughts in CB.

...the main characters always need to end up making babies in backwards Barrayar, so we end up with all these heterosexual pairings and babies.

I think that's because she's more of a traditional romance writer. Even the two books about Aral and Cordelia that started the Vorkosigan 'verse are really just romance in space. Granted, she didn't go the whole bodice-ripper route, but if you look at the elements of that story, it's less SF and more traditional romance. Same with the Sharing Knife books--they're more romance than fantasy.

I think she's just a traditional gal at heart, but yeah, I have to admit that it would be really great to see someone of her standing in mainstream publishing make steps outside the het 'norm'. I would like to see a nonstandard relationship treated as just a natural part of the story. Stephen King did that with Cell, where one of his main characters just happened to be gay--it wasn't a plot point, the sexual orientation didn't factor into the development of the storyline or the characters. It was simply an acknowledgement that there are gay people in the world and that they're just as capable of quietly saving the world as Main Straight Guy is. I thought it was a pretty cool statement, without actually being a statement.

I don't particularly want to see Miles with his kids (have enough kids of my own, thank you), but I want to see him scrambling.

Ha! Well, I think the 'scrambling' part is what makes me want to see him with the kids. Because he can't exactly solve kid-problems with a blaster, so it would be fun to watch how he does it.

I think the main thing about CB for me was that, throughout the entirety of the Vor series, with each new addition, we saw some sort of growth in Miles, some sort of personal challenge he needed to overcome. Sometimes he succeeded and sometimes he didn't, but it always enhanced his characterization and gave it more depth.

There was none of that in CB. We watched him work on a case that required no more and no less intelligence and craft than we expect from him, and that was it. We didn't get to know him any better, nothing was enhanced. It seemed to me more of a vehicle for Roic than anything having to do with Miles. And don't get me wrong, I love Roic. But Roic isn't why I devour the Miles books.

(Did you know about the LMB mailing list? I've been on it for several years, and managed to get myself an eARC of CryoBurn from Baen through an announcement on the list about 4 mos before the book was available publicly. LMB even drops by occasionally and puts her 2 cents in. I haven't been paying attention for over a year now, so I don't know if they did the eARC again with Ivan's book, but they probably did. Let me know if you want a link.)


message 22: by Kaje (last edited May 07, 2012 11:08AM) (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments I really do want to get an inside look at Ivan. I've been speculating for years about what's going on in his head.

I agree that she's a pretty traditional romance person. But in Ethan of Athos, the romance is M/M, if only budding by the end of the story. So she has done it once.


message 23: by LenaLena (new)

LenaLena (Marilenalena) | 2 comments The Sharing Knife wasn't my thing. Too much Noble Savage going on.

Miles getting hurt = Miles getting personal growth. I think we are trying to say the same thing.

Miles did already go beyond the blasters in Komar and Civil Campaign, so I don't really need to see him with his kids. What I would like to see is how he takes on the role of his father and how he would deal with the politics on Barrayar more. Maybe I just don't want to read about kids, though.

Kaje wrote: "I really do want to get an inside look at Ivan. I've been speculating for years about what's going on in his head.

I agree that she's a pretty traditional romance person. But in Ethan of Athos, ..."


Ditto on both. Ivan is a great character. And Ethan was written about 25 years ago. Pretty good statement back then, anyway. No tragic ending, which was pretty much par for the course for gay MCs at the time.


message 24: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments So I wanted to ask - how many books are going to be in the Wolf's-own series? Is the third one the end? Because you know I started Aisling when the third book wasn't out yet and the wait was painful. I decided to read this series when i can get them all, but I'm kind of rethinking that if there will be more than three.


message 25: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Kaje wrote: "So I wanted to ask - how many books are going to be in the Wolf's-own series? Is the third one the end? Because you know I started Aisling when the third book wasn't out yet and the wait was pain..."

There are four books total. Koan will be out May 21st, and I don't have a firm date yet for Incendiary but it will be out some time in June. (One of the reasons I went with DSP for this one was because they were really great about giving me a quick release schedule. As a reader, I hate waiting for the next book in a series, too, so I wanted the releases to be as close together as possible.)

I did a FAQ about this series a little while ago that might help you decide. It's here: http://www.goodreads.com/author_blog_...

The short answer is that it's safe to read one and two without waiting on the rest. In fact, if a reader wanted to stop after book two, they absolutely could. One and two cover one arc, and three and four cover another, but one and two together can be considered a complete story.

:)


message 26: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Ah, well then I definitely want 1 & 2 now. Thank you!


message 27: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Kaje wrote: "Ah, well then I definitely want 1 & 2 now. Thank you!"

WAIT! I should have mentioned--there's a free download on my author page @ DSP. It's called Rapport. The story won't mean anything to you unless you've read at least book one, but there's an easter egg in the back of it that will give you 20% off any W-o purchase. So get that first before you buy!


message 28: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Carole wrote: "Kaje wrote: "Ah, well then I definitely want 1 & 2 now. Thank you!"

WAIT! I should have mentioned--there's a free download on my author page @ DSP. It's called Rapport. The story won't mean anyth..."


Ah - good catch - I'll do that. I'm saving these as a reward for when I finish the LiAW story I'm still writing; It's close. Than I can go buy new books.


message 29: by C (new)

C (crisstan) | 16 comments Kaje wrote: "Ah, well then I definitely want 1 & 2 now. Thank you!"

Kaje, you won't regret it - they are fantastic!

Carole, I'm so excited to have a release date for Wolf's-Own 3. It happens that the morning after release I'll be on a plane from Seattle to Nashville, so that'll make the trip SO much better. Well, until I get to the end screaming curses at you for whatever hell you plan to put your loyal, devoted readers through until Book 4! LOL!


message 30: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Aw, thanks, Cris. :) And I'll be posting a contest tomorrow for the eARC, so keep an eye out.

Also--you may curse me all you want, but you can't say I didn't warn you! :D


message 31: by C (new)

C (crisstan) | 16 comments Carole wrote: "Aw, thanks, Cris. :) And I'll be posting a contest tomorrow for the eARC, so keep an eye out.

Also--you may curse me all you want, but you can't say I didn't warn you! :D"


True, it'll be my own fault, yet somehow I don't see that stopping me :D


message 32: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Hi, Thorny. Thank you for stopping in and for your question. :)

The question is a really good one, and I wish I had a ‘do this and then do that’ answer for you that would make me look really with it and like I’m qualified to give advice. I can (try to) tell you how it works for me, but everyone has a distinctly individual process, so I’m not going to pretend it’ll work for or make sense to anyone else.

For me it starts with an image. Aisling came about because I had been reading about the legal systems in Medieval England and Ireland. Somehow, a character who decided his name was Wil also decided that an old time interrogation room was a good place to be, so he plunked himself down and started brooding about why he ended up there.

I kind of joke about the ‘movies’ that run in my head, but that’s really what it is for me. I have several at a time that kind of serve as a constant background hum in the back of my brain, and they will eventually bubble to the front and insist that I write them. If I don’t, I can’t get the images to leave me alone, and it doesn’t help that the characters are often practicing their dialogue on me while all of this is going on. And every time the ‘movie’ plays in my head, it gains more detail and the characters become more insistent that they are, indeed, Real People and their story must be told.

In other words, it’s all very visual and auditory for me. I ‘see’ the worlds long before I try to describe them in prose; I ‘hear’ the characters yakking at each other (or me) from day one, and so I learn who they are and what they’re about, what kind of world they live in and what kinds of conflicts they face.

In fantasy, there’s often magic involved, which can help the world to evolve as you write it. Magic is magical, of course—it’s not science and it doesn’t have to be scientific—but it still has to have rules, and figuring those rules out can help you figure out what the rest of the world is like. For instance, if everyone in the world has the ability to make fire by snapping their fingers, there’s no need for lamps and such, right? So does that also mean there’s no need to cut wood or mine coal? Exactly how influential in the world’s overall development is the fact that the world’s occupants don’t have to worry about freezing to death or keeping warm in the snow? Was hair genetically excluded from their DNA so they wouldn’t be constantly setting themselves on fire? Do they all have shiny night-vision eyes to see in the dark, since they don’t have lamps? And does all of this immediately rule out the eventual development of the lightbulb and other modern conveniences? Does that mean they won’t move on to become an industrialized society? These kinds of things influence not only the world, but the characters and how they react to the world, all of which helps to develop the story as a whole.

The one caution I would give about world-building is not to fall into the Council of Elrond trap. Don’t explain your world with the entirety of chapter one or in a prologue ninety percent of readers will skip anyway; don’t insert Author’s Voice asides to explain things to the reader. Explain the world only as each individual explanation becomes necessary. Find a way to make every important aspect of the world that needs exposition a part of the story’s development in as natural a way as possible. You don’t spend three paragraphs on telling the reader that hair was not included in the characters’ DNA and that they have night vision—you have one character observe the bow tied around another’s smooth, well-shaped head and how the gold in the bow complements the coin-like glint of their eyes in the dark. You’ve accomplished your goal in one sentence and in a more natural way that won’t throw a reader out of the story or make them roll their eyes. You probably won’t fit everything about that world into the story—there will be things you know about the world that readers never will because the necessity of telling them never came up in exposition—but that’s not a bad thing. Don’t force the details—only use them if they’re a necessary part of story/characterization/setting. Knowing your world better than the reader ever will gives it depth and reality.

Other than that, I would just say to let your mind wander, don’t let your logical side tell your imagination that it’s being silly, allow yourself to stare off into space and watch your world develop. And then question every development, understand it yourself before you try to explain it to someone else. Know the evolution of that world and its inhabitants, even if you’ll never have to show it. Know the histories of your characters, even if they’re going to end up dying two paragraphs after you introduce them. The majority of writing is done in one’s head and not at the keyboard, so let yourself go, be ‘silly’, be free, and let yourself imagine. Others might see it as daydreaming or wasting time, but for a writer, daydreaming is a necessary tool and vital food for the imagination—it’s work! It’s productive, damn it! If you can give plausible reasons in the context of your made-up world for what your imagination came up with, you’ve just built a world. All you have to do now is describe it in prose in a way a reader will believe.

Er… *chews lip* Was that even close to what you were looking for?


message 33: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Council of Elrond trap - I like that. And I love your explanation. World-building without info-dumping is such a difficult line to walk, and one of the things you did so well in Aisling. (I can't wait to see it in Wolf's Own which I am still waiting to buy, but getting very close to...)


message 34: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments @Kaje--aw, thanks, love.

@Thorny--oh good, I'm glad it at least kind of answered the question. And yeah, I'm with you on the hair. I like it long or at least shaggy in most cases. But definitely there! ;)


message 35: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments I just bought the first two Wolf's Own books last night :) (I sent my story to betas, turned around and got them. Now I have to finish one other I promised to review and I can indulge in your world-building.) And hey, I just had a fantasy short accepted so I guess mine's not too shabby either :D


message 36: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Oh yay, congrats! I love all kinds of genres, but fantasy has always been my top pick, so I'm really looking forward to yours! :)


message 37: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Carole wrote: "Oh yay, congrats! I love all kinds of genres, but fantasy has always been my top pick, so I'm really looking forward to yours! :)"

It's an anthology - I'm not sure when it will be out, but I just got the contract. I'm trying very hard not to listen to the guys saying they want a novel.


message 38: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Kaje wrote: "It's an anthology - I'm not sure when it will be out, but I just got the contract. I'm trying very hard not to listen to the guys saying they want a novel."

Ahahahaha! Well, best of luck to you on that. But I'll bet they'll end up getting a whole lot of support from readers, so I might end up betting on them. ;)


message 39: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Just started Ghost; I can already tell I won't get a lot of chores done this weekend. :)


message 40: by Sammy Goode (new)

Sammy Goode | 5363 comments Carole wrote: "Hi, Thorny. Thank you for stopping in and for your question. :)

The question is a really good one, and I wish I had a ‘do this and then do that’ answer for you that would make me look really with..."



"I ‘hear’ the characters yakking at each other (or me) from day one, and so I learn who they are and what they’re about, what kind of world they live in and what kinds of conflicts they face."

Carole, this is exactly how I write a script--it is really true! I hear them---see them--feel them! Thank you so much for this really fascinating explanation!!!


message 41: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Oh, yay, Sammy--now we can be slightly crazy together! :D I'm imagining what you do to be a little more difficult, actually. I mean, it seems like it would be harder--for me, at least, because my head works in a different way--to take what I 'see' and turn it into actual direction. I can get things across by phrasing in a certain way, or set a mood by overall tone--you would have to actually come up with stage direction to achieve all that, wouldn't you?


message 42: by Sammy Goode (new)

Sammy Goode | 5363 comments Carole wrote: "Oh, yay, Sammy--now we can be slightly crazy together! :D I'm imagining what you do to be a little more difficult, actually. I mean, it seems like it would be harder--for me, at least, because my..."

Well yes and no...actors hate--HATE when we put in stage directions because they say it "limits their choices" so the tough part of scripting is putting enough emotion into the dialogue that you are actually guiding the actor without them knowing it! HAHA!!! Rather sneaky I know!! So I think maybe that our worlds are closer than we think?? We playwrights are a bit full of ourselves--something authors of prose are not I think!! LOL!!


message 43: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Sammy2006 wrote: "We playwrights are a bit full of ourselves..."

I see no evidence of that.


message 44: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments BTW, Carole is doing a chat on Dreamspinner press group this afternoon 1-6 PM EST http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/9... so you can stop by there to say Hi.


message 45: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Sammy2006 wrote: "Carole wrote: "Oh, yay, Sammy--now we can be slightly crazy together! :D I'm imagining what you do to be a little more difficult, actually. I mean, it seems like it would be harder--for me, at le..."

Ahahahaha! I'm betting some actors are a lot easier to 'guide' than others.

Authors? Full of ourselves? *gasp!* The very idea! ;) I don't know, I bet authors and playwrights would give each other a run for their money in the sweepstakes of bi-polar I'm-so-good-at-this/OMG-I-totally-suck! It's such a weird dichotomy of self-confidence versus complete lack of it, isn't it?


message 46: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Kaje wrote: "BTW, Carole is doing a chat on Dreamspinner press group this afternoon 1-6 PM EST http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/9... so you can stop by there to say Hi."

Thank you, Kaje, that was very sweet of you. :)


message 47: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Carole wrote: "Kaje wrote: "BTW, Carole is doing a chat on Dreamspinner press group this afternoon 1-6 PM EST http://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/9... so you can stop by there to say Hi."..."

I hope you have fun - I'm not a group member there so I wouldn't be able to comment, but i may wander over at the end to read your comments.


message 48: by Carole (new)

Carole Cummings | 21 comments Thanks, Kaje. Only a few, but I enjoyed answering the questions. And now I'm officially off the clock, and no one came to throw things at me, so I'm counting it as a win. ;)


message 49: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Carole wrote: "Thanks, Kaje. Only a few, but I enjoyed answering the questions. And now I'm officially off the clock, and no one came to throw things at me,...)"

As if anyone was going to. Hah.


message 50: by Kaje (new)

Kaje Harper | 14874 comments Hey, Carole, I wanted to say thanks for hanging out with us this month - it's been fun for us and we got some very interesting looks at your writing process in with the chat. We appreciate you taking the time!


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