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General > 1895 Significance

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message 1: by Crystle (new)

Crystle | 4 comments Sorry, this is more of a simple question than a discussion topic, but I've noticed that 1895 seems to have some particular significance regarding Sherlock Holmes, and was wondering what that is?


message 2: by Shanawaz (new)

Shanawaz Ali (shaan_d206) | 7 comments Crystle wrote: "Sorry, this is more of a simple question than a discussion topic, but I've noticed that 1895 seems to have some particular significance regarding Sherlock Holmes, and was wondering what that is?"

I can't recall anything could u be more specific?


message 3: by Crystle (new)

Crystle | 4 comments I just noticed that the screename of someone posting or involved with "the Great Holmesian Debate" was something like "it's always 1895", also in the BBC Sherlock series, the number 1895 pops up as a plot point, so I'm assuming it's a reference of some sort...but have no idea what it refers to. Could it be when the first Sherlock holmes story was published, or when the characters in the stories met or something of that sort?


message 4: by Joanna (new)

Joanna (foxwrapped) | 353 comments It comes from a poem by Vincent Starrett, a very significant early Sherlockian. It was first published in 1942. Here it is:

221B

Here dwell together still two men of note
Who never lived and so can never die:
How very near they seem, yet how remote
That age before the world went all awry.
But still the game’s afoot for those with ears
Attuned to catch the distant view-halloo:
England is England yet, for all our fears–
Only those things the heart believes are true.

A yellow fog swirls past the window-pane
As night descends upon this fabled street:
A lonely hansom splashes through the rain,
The ghostly gas lamps fail at twenty feet.
Here, though the world explode, these two survive,
And it is always eighteen ninety-five.

Always1985 actually is a member here! He's Matt. Here's his blogpost on 1895.


message 5: by Shanawaz (new)

Shanawaz Ali (shaan_d206) | 7 comments Crystle wrote: "I just noticed that the screename of someone posting or involved with "the Great Holmesian Debate" was something like "it's always 1895", also in the BBC Sherlock series, the number 1895 pops up as..."

so i googled a little and came up with this:

Conan Doyle tried to kill off Holmes at the end of his second story collection, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes (1895). Public outcry was so strong, though, that he eventually brought Holmes back to life after a decade's hiatus

I remember my english teacher telling me that a crowd gathered outside Sir Arthur's house wearing black arm bands demanding that Holmes be brought back to life one woman is even reported to have said "Bring him back you brute!"

So i guess that's the significance of 1895, its the year Holmes was killed by Moriarty only to be resurrected.


message 6: by Joanna (new)

Joanna (foxwrapped) | 353 comments Shanawaz wrote: "So i guess that's the significance of 1895, its the year Holmes was killed by Moriarty only to be resurrected."

That's a good point! Probably was why Starrett chose the year 1895.


message 7: by Matt (last edited Mar 13, 2012 10:51PM) (new)

Matt (Always1895) | 41 comments Hello everyone. I love to see that people are taking an interest in 1895 and it's various Sherlockian connections. And thanks for the mention Joanna!

The main reason "1895" is referenced in the BBC Sherlock is to pay homage to Vincent Starrett's poem 221B (cf. Joanna's post above). For example, when Watson's blog counter gets 'stuck' on 1895 hits, one might say his counter is "always 1895", a direct quote from the last line of Starrett's 221B poem ("And it is always eighteen ninety-five.").

A slightly lesser known version is from Starrett's excellent book: The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1933) on page 93 (Otto Penzler version): "So they still live for all that love them well: in a romantic chamber of the heart, in a nostalgic country of the mind, where it is always 1895."

My blog Always1895.net and twitter @always1895 is a reference to and celebration of both.

As to why Starrett chose the year 1895, my best guess is that, according to Watson, Holmes' best year was in 1895. From "Black Peter": "I have never known my friend to be in better form, both mental and physical, than in the year ‘95." Please note, Holmes 'died' (or began the Great Hiatus) in 1891 (cf. "The Final Problem" published in 1893) and 'returned' in 1894 (cf. "The Empty House" published in 1903). There are various apocryphal stories that Strand readers donned black arm bands after reading "The Final Problem" in 1893 and ACD received a letter that started off "You brute!".

For further reading, check out:
* Dan Andriacco's 'It is Always 1895' post. Mr Andriacco has written a few books about Sherlock Holmes on MX.
* My post about Vincent Starrett and 221B 'The Poem that Launched a Thousand Prefaces'.
* And of course the Sherlock Holmes stories set in 1895: "The Three Students", "The Solitary Cyclist", "Black Peter" and "The Bruce-Partington Plans". (And depending on which chronology you subscribe to, there may be a few more.)


message 8: by Joanna (new)

Joanna (foxwrapped) | 353 comments Matt wrote: "Hello everyone. I love to see that people are taking an interest in 1895 and it's various Sherlockian connections. And thanks for the mention Joanna!

The main reason "1895" is referenced in the B..."


Wow, thanks for the informative post!


message 9: by Crystle (new)

Crystle | 4 comments Yeah, thanks everyone!


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The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (other topics)

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Dan Andriacco (other topics)
Vincent Starrett (other topics)