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Suggestions & Questions > Difference between "ebook" and "Kindle edition" formats

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message 1: by Paweł (new)

Paweł Paprota (ppawel) AFAIK Kindle edition is basically an e-book - why distinguish between those two formats then?


message 2: by ★Meghan★ (new)

★Meghan★ (starinheaven) | 30 comments A Kindle edition is sold under an ASIN whereas a ebook has an ISBN. They are not necessarily any different, but it is like when they come out with a new cover on a paperback edition. There is a paperback edition for the two different ISBNs. Does this make sense?


message 3: by Sandil (new)

Sandil I have found newer ebooks with the preface eISBN. Neither the regular or the kindle work for entering this book to the library. In fact a totally different book with ISBN same numerals but lacking the "e" came up. This occurance is an exception to the rule right now but seems to be gaining in use.


message 4: by Paweł (new)

Paweł Paprota (ppawel) I've got a book that I bought from Amazon and it has e-ISBN as Sandil said above. It seems that it's either ISBN or ASIN in Goodreads database :(


message 5: by Djrmel (new)

Djrmel | 304 comments According to Bowker, the company that creates the ISBNs and sells them to publishers, there's no such thing as an e-ISBN and they don't want publishers or distributors using the term.

http://www.isbn.org/standards/home/ab...


message 6: by ★Meghan★ (new)

★Meghan★ (starinheaven) | 30 comments When they put e-ISBNs in the book it is generally when the publisher is being lazy and wants to use the same copyright page within the paperback/hardback format and the ebook format. I have seen this in some of my ebooks that I have bought from B&N and it shows both on the copyright page.


message 7: by Sandil (new)

Sandil I don't really care too much about the rules and regs, what I do care about is to accurately enter my book into my library. If you build it they will come.


message 8: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 589 comments Sandil wrote: "I don't really care too much about the rules and regs, what I do care about is to accurately enter my book into my library. If you build it they will come."

Not caring about "rules and regs" (actually "standards" - the difference between a regulation and a standard is that standards require voluntary conformance) is how we get into this ridiculous situation. If it's just an ISBN with an "e" in it, just enter it as an ISBN, and with an appropriate format. If there's already a book with that ISBN, then enter it without an ISBN, just as you would with any other book that the publisher has reused an ISBN for. GoodReads, or anybody else, can't be expected to support every possible identifier an idiot publisher might choose to use.


message 9: by Sandil (new)

Sandil Well that told me Derek. I am just a reader, wanting to enjoy the benefits of Goodreads. Your burden is much heavier, I suppose. I do however question, being a dedicated Sony and Kobo ereader user, why Kindle has the unique ability to have an ISBN all it's own, while the plethera of other readers must settle for No ISBN at all because rules and regs do not recognize all of them only the golden Kindle?


message 10: by rivka, librarian moderator (last edited Mar 07, 2012 06:03AM) (new)

rivka | 12128 comments Mod
C.S. wrote: "If you find a book with an eISBN, that's the author's error. As far as I know, there's no such thing."

An eISBN is simply an ISBN-13 assigned to an ebook. They can and should be entered on GR the same as any other ISBN-13.


message 11: by Cloudedleopard (new)

Cloudedleopard | 29 comments Lots of ebooks I own have an ISBN. It is for sure different from the ISBN of other formats such as paperback or hardcover.

I don't think that only (e)books get an ISBN if the author pays for it. It's rather the publisher who registers the books of his company, therefore it includes the publisher code.

The difference between an ebook and kindle edition - none exept the format. Ebooks (for Sony, Kobo etc.) are usually in *.epub or *.pdf whereas amazon created it's own standard called *.azw. Nevertheless, kindle editions simply are ebooks.


message 12: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 589 comments Sandil wrote: "Well that told me Derek. I am just a reader, wanting to enjoy the benefits of Goodreads. Your burden is much heavier, I suppose. I do however question, being a dedicated Sony and Kobo ereader user..."

There's no need to get upset just because I told you how to enter ISBNs. Kindle has its own identifier because Amazon has gone to the trouble of establishing a format, and it's got a large base making it worthwhile. An e-isbn is not a "format": it's an ISBN, so you enter it in the ISBN field. If the publisher (please, C.S, it's not the author's error unless it's self-published) chooses to reuse ISBNs for different formats, he's entitled to - but it's non-standard, and GR can't be expected to figure out every possible non-standard use.

Cloudedleopard wrote: "The difference between an ebook and kindle edition - none exept the format. Ebooks (for Sony, Kobo etc.) are usually in *.epub or *.pdf whereas amazon created it's own standard called *.azw. "

Well, actually, .azw are just .mobi files, usually with DRM, and many systems accept .mobi


message 13: by Robin (new)

Robin (ukamerican) | 589 comments Sandil wrote: "while the plethera of other readers must settle for No ISBN at all because rules and regs do not recognize all of them only the golden Kindle? "

I don't believe that's the case - ebooks do have unique ISBN numbers and they are used on Goodreads. No one is saying ebooks can't have ISBN numbers, quite the opposite.

The main reason I think it's important to have separate Kindle editions with ASIN numbers is because then when you click "Amazon" under "Get a copy: online stores/book links", it takes you straight to the Kindle edition on Amazon. With the great separation from Amazon, I'm just grateful this convenience has remained.

Also, some Kindle editions have different ASIN numbers for the US store and UK store so it's important to distinguish them because a member of the US store can't buy from the UK store and vice versus. Plus, just like paper books, the UK Kindle edition sometimes has a different cover than the US Kindle edition. Just as you want your books entered correctly into your library, so too does a UK Kindle owner want the right ASIN numbers and covers for their Kindle books.

Fact of the matter remains that Kindle books and other ebooks use different file formats and are considered different editions, even if the content within the book is the same and they are both electronic version. Therefore, they deserve different identifying numbers. I don't know why you seem to think that is some kind of insult to non-Kindle ereaders.


message 14: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 589 comments Robin wrote: "Just as you want your books entered correctly into your library, so too does a UK Kindle owner want the right ASIN numbers and covers for their Kindle books."

Yeah, but Amazon could have just used ISBNs...


message 15: by rivka, librarian moderator (new)

rivka | 12128 comments Mod
Except that many authors publish for Kindle and no other platform, and are likely not to have ISBNs. Amazon wanted all Kindle editions to be consistent, I imagine.


message 16: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 589 comments rivka wrote: "Except that many authors publish for Kindle and no other platform, and are likely not to have ISBNs. Amazon wanted all Kindle editions to be consistent, I imagine."

Sure, but Amazon _could_ have chosen to get ISBNs for all those Kindle editions - but then they'd have to either swallow the cost or charge the author's that much extra to get on Amazon. Or they could have said "we won't carry your book without an ISBN". Instead they decided to skip the ISBN altogether, as is their right, but it messes up everybody else because you can no longer assume every book in your collection has an ISBN (if you ever could: half of my collection is from the Science Fiction Book Club, and none of them have ISBNs). At least those books with an "e-ISBN" have a real ISBN, even if it doesn't strictly belong on that edition.


message 17: by Sandil (new)

Sandil Well, I think we have had some really interesting and healthy debate on a topic that is becoming increasingly of import.
Please let me regurgitate what I believe the gist of the discussion was and how it effects me. I say without any spurn or spite, please correct me if I err.
First the rules and regs do have in fact the procedure for entering ebooks and the correct way is ISBN-13. with the preface 13 meaning ebook. (According to Rivka). In agreement I have previously stated I have entered into goodreads ebooks successfully so they must have had the 13 preface.
Next, The ebooks using eISBN are in error and the fingerpointing is at publishers who are either unaware of the 13 preface or are taking a corner cut. These books can not be entered into Goodreads because another book using the ISBN will appear. The only option for that book is to pretend it is either a paper back or a kindle.
Thirdly we agree to disagree that Amazon has the right to have it's own coding because it is so very differant from all other mobile and ereaders.
Lastly, not yet addressed, I my increased upset with the corner cutting. It is a good thing ebooks at this point in time do not need to be barcoded. If I remember correctly from my librarian days, The title, author, ISBN, genre area all assigned to a specific bar code to be signed out correctly. These ebooks with watery ISBN's would be impossible to bar code.
So thank you all to the brains more knowledgeable than mine It seems nothing has changed, and my ebook story remains a pretend kindle because some unknown publisher wanted to be a pain in the ..end. I understand and have from the start that both Goodreads and its patrons are caught in the middle. I just really do not like having to bow yet again to the monopoly that is Amazon and call my sony story kindle. from A small fish in a very big sea.


message 18: by Elizabeth (Alaska) (last edited Mar 07, 2012 02:49PM) (new)

Elizabeth (Alaska) | 15383 comments Sandil wrote: "ISBN-13. with the preface 13 meaning ebook. (According to Rivka). In agreement I have previously stated I have entered into goodreads ebooks successfully so they must have had the 13 preface."

No, I'm fairly certain that all books issued now have a 13 digit ISBN.

Example of a hardcover edition:

ISBN 0224094157 (ISBN13: 9780224094153)


message 19: by Random (last edited Mar 07, 2012 02:55PM) (new)

Random (rand0m1s) | 620 comments Sandil wrote: "The ebooks using eISBN are in error and the fingerpointing is at publishers who are either unaware of the 13 preface or are taking a corner cut. These books can not be entered into Goodreads because another book using the ISBN will appear. The only option for that book is to pretend it is either a paper back or a kindle. "

If the ebook and a print book are both sharing the same ISBN (and this happens often), we still enter the ebook into Goodreads, we just don't give it an ISBN. Many librarians will make a note about the shared ISBN.


message 20: by rivka, librarian moderator (new)

rivka | 12128 comments Mod
I'm not sure what you mean about a "preface 13". There is no such preface. ISBN-13 means the newer, 13-digit ISBNs. So far, they all start with 978, although I think that's supposed to start changing soon.


message 21: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 589 comments Sandil wrote: "It is a good thing ebooks at this point in time do not need to be barcoded. If I remember correctly from my librarian days, The title, author, ISBN, genre area all assigned to a specific bar code to be signed out correctly. These ebooks with watery ISBN's would be impossible to bar code."

Not so - libraries assign their own unique barcodes, which are no doubt cross-referenced to ISBNs where known, but not dependent on a book having an ISBN.


message 22: by Sandil (new)

Sandil yep, you are right.


message 23: by Paweł (last edited Mar 07, 2012 11:49PM) (new)

Paweł Paprota (ppawel) I see that my innocent question sparked a debate - cool :-)

I don't know much about rules and regulations for publishers, I'm just a simple book/music cataloging geek :-) And so it does not feel right when I can't enter all the relevant data into Goodreads for e-books that I buy on Amazon, i.e. "Kindle edition" format = ASIN, "ebook" format = ISBN(-13) while my Amazon-bought e-books have ISBN-13/e-ISBN and I think this data should be in the database as well.

All in all, for me the solution would be to allow entering ISBN(-13)/e-ISBN/whatever for "Kindle edition" formats (in addition to ASIN of course).


message 24: by Cloudedleopard (new)

Cloudedleopard | 29 comments IF a book has an ISBN (no matter whether it is kindle or not) this should be entered as ISBN (10 or 13 depending on the system used when registered). There is the possibility to switch between ISBN and ASIN when you're entering a book. And there is the option to choose what kind of edition the book is, where kindle, ebook or other formats can be used.


message 25: by Paula (new)

Paula (Paulaan) | 569 comments If a book is defined as a kindle edition then ASIN is used we not currently have a policy to set kindle format for ISBN.

Audio.com books will also use AISN


message 26: by Cloudedleopard (new)

Cloudedleopard | 29 comments Then I'd rather leave the format open than the ISBN...
but it is possible to enter an ISBN AND the format kindle.


message 27: by rivka, librarian moderator (new)

rivka | 12128 comments Mod
Cloudedleopard wrote: "Then I'd rather leave the format open than the ISBN...
but it is possible to enter an ISBN AND the format kindle."


But it's not accurate. Those ISBNs can be and most often are used to sell the ebook on other sites as well, so with an ISBN the more general ebook is the appropriate choice.


message 28: by Cloudedleopard (last edited Mar 08, 2012 01:23AM) (new)

Cloudedleopard | 29 comments This is why I said I'd rather leave the format open than the ISBN. The ISBN is a definite way of identifying a book, no matter if it has a soft cover, a hard cover or no cover at all because it's electronic. If ebook might be more appropriate, then why not enter this since kindle editions are simply ebooks. But as soon as my "text" has an ISBN, this should be the more important information, or am I completely wrong? There is the option to comment in the librarian log. So would it be OK to enter format "ebook", ISBN and in the comment field in addition that it is a kindle version? No offense meant to the GR team, but why is it so important to differentiate between ebook and kindle version as soon as this kindle edition-ebook has an ISBN?

I am just asking because I don't want to get it and do it wrong here, when I'm preparing book information.


message 29: by Robin (new)

Robin (ukamerican) | 589 comments Derek wrote: "Yeah, but Amazon could have just used ISBNs... "

The Kindle edition does not have an ISBN number - look on any Kindle book on Amazon and it won't list an ISBN. The ebook ISBN number is not a catch all for all electronic versions. Notice that some publishers like Penguin even have different ISBN numbers for the epub version and the Adobe reader version. Just like each print format is unique, so to is each digital format.

Because of this, like I said, it also then wouldn't link straight to the Kindle edition on Amazon when using "get a copy: online stores/book links", a feature I use a LOT.


message 30: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 589 comments Robin wrote: "Derek wrote: "Yeah, but Amazon could have just used ISBNs... "

The Kindle edition does not have an ISBN number - look on any Kindle book on Amazon and it won't list an ISBN."


Sigh... I know that. But in a perfect world, Amazon would have made sure Kindle editions did have an ISBN. They didn't have to introduce a new identifier, but it's all part of their standard operating procedure.

Of course publishers like Penguin have different ISBN's for different versions - that's the whole point: they're supposed to!


message 31: by Elizabeth (Alaska) (last edited Mar 10, 2012 07:36AM) (new)

Elizabeth (Alaska) | 15383 comments Derek, I think the main difference is that ebook versions are readable on a wide variety of devices, whereas kindle versions are readable only on the kindle device. Kindle will also read these other versions, but the Nook or Kobe, for instance cannot read Kindle. I think it is more than DRM, which is the restrictor usually used for library loans. Perhaps it is used in other applications as well.


message 32: by Derek (new)

Derek (derek_broughton) | 589 comments Elizabeth (Alaska) wrote: "Derek, I think the main difference is that ebook versions are readable on a wide variety of devices, whereas kindle versions are readable only on the kindle device. Kindle will also read these othe..."

Precisely. (Though in fact, Kindle's .azw files would be readable on other software except for the DRM - they're just .mobi files, really; and Kindle apparently still can't read ePubs). But this is all just Amazon policy, and it's the policy that caused the original question. Amazon could have still used ISBNs but chose to use their own ASIN.


message 33: by Robin (new)

Robin (ukamerican) | 589 comments Derek wrote: "Sigh... I know that. But in a perfect world, Amazon would have made sure Kindle editions did have an ISBN. They didn't have to introduce a new identifier, but it's all part of their standard operating procedure."

I guess I just don't see why it matters. It's just an identifying number - who cares if it's called ISBN or ASIN? Isn't that a little pedantic? If Kindle editions had an ISBN number, it would probably still be a different number to the epub format (just as the Adobe reader format has a different ISBN from the epub) and therefore should still be input into Goodreads separately. Different formats = different numbers = different entries on Goodreads.


message 34: by ~Thena~ (new)

~Thena~ (athena-nadine) | 166 comments Just to muddy the waters a bit more...

This is how I understand it--if an ebook has an ASIN it is entered as a Kindle book. If it has an ISBN, it is entered as an ebook. If it has a BNID, which starts with 294, it is a NOOK book.


message 35: by lafon حمزة (new)

lafon حمزة نوفل (lafon) | 532 comments ~Thena~ ♥Machar ♥ Spade ♥ Ethan ♥ Harry♥ wrote: "Just to muddy the waters a bit more...

This is how I understand it--if an ebook has an ASIN it is entered as a Kindle book. If it has an ISBN, it is entered as an ebook. If it has a BNID, which starts with 294, it is a NOOK book."


Still listed as an ebook though. We don't have a Nook format.

Also, I'm not sure why people want to list an ISBN as part of a Kindle edition. To my knowledge, the only entities who regularly know if an ISBN was used with a Kindle ebook is Amazon (they should have it stored somewhere), and the author/publisher. The only way anyone else could know, is if the author/publisher decided to include that ISBN on the copyright page. To top it all off, you can't use any of these Kindle ISBNs as identifiers (which is basically what they were created for), because no database lists them. I don't see why you'd need to have list a Kindle edition with an ISBN here.


message 36: by ~Thena~ (new)

~Thena~ (athena-nadine) | 166 comments lafon حمزة wrote: "~Thena~ ♥Machar ♥ Spade ♥ Ethan ♥ Harry♥ wrote: "Just to muddy the waters a bit more...

This is how I understand it--if an ebook has an ASIN it is entered as a Kindle book. If it has an ISBN, it ..."


Which, I assume, is mainly because B&N hasn't made the format they use proprietary and they haven't stopped using ISBNs the way Amazon has.

(I'm pretty sure I've seen "nook" designated in the edition field, though I think it's wrong to put it there)


message 37: by Vicky (new)

Vicky (librovert) | 813 comments Kinde Editions get treated differently because they are the only eBooks to use the .mobi file type and .mobi files are not readable on any device other than a Kindle (unless of course you have a DRM stripper and a converter, but since that isn't exactly legal we'll leave that out of the equation).

Barnes & Noble and Kobo both use .ePubs (and in some cases PDFs) which are a much more universal form of an eBook, hence why they all get lumped together as one format.


lafon حمزة wrote: "To top it all off, you can't use any of these Kindle ISBNs as identifiers (which is basically what they were created for), because no database lists them."

The Kindle Edition quite often has the same ISBN as the ePub. I have plenty of Kindle Editions that have the same ISBN on the copyright page that can be bought from B&N. I think it's less common for an author to purchase multiple ISBN numbers for each platform than it is for the same ISBN to be used across the board.


message 38: by Robin (new)

Robin (ukamerican) | 589 comments Rick wrote: "Is there any difference bbetween a book in print and a kindle book? I was told that a kindle book is not a word for word book of the print book."

If the content in a Kindle book or any other ebook wasn't the same as it is in print, people probably wouldn't buy them. Occasionally, ebooks will have OCR errors from being scanned from print but those should be corrected before the ebook is released and usually are. And since it's scanned from print, it is obviously the same content as the print book.


message 39: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited Mar 26, 2013 11:48AM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) Reinventing the wheel here. See the ebook guidelines from the isbn agency—a portion of those guidelines somewhat more readable are at http://www.isbn-international.org/new... . Explore rest of their site for more specifics and more rules. Not my opinion and not goodreads standards, the isbn agency rules for using isbns on ebooks (echoed on the U.S. isbn agency, Bowkers, site).

Some main points for ebooks:
1. No, print editions and ebook editions can never share an isbn. (Ebooks not always properly edited on copyright page to reflect). Absolutely not allowed by isbn agency under any circumstance.

2. If only readable on a specific device, unique isbn or bookseller identifier needed.

3. If only selling directly from author site or their publisher/distributor, isbn not required (and no worries if odd isbn information displayed). Bookseller sites and stores need. That includes sites like Smashwords and Baen allowing multiple types of files to download but only using one ebook isbn. Still not allowed to use ebook isbn for print book and vice versa; but okay if the one author or publisher site not setting a new isbn for direct download files.

How that translates into goodreads standards — almost verbatim. An ebook edition with an isbn separate from print edition not device restricted gets a format of "ebook" plain and simple.

My understanding: almost always an ebook with a single, unique isbn has a single edition with format="ebook" and done. Nothing else in edition field or book description (unless something like "3rd edition"). Certainly not bookseller site purchase links or limited time promotions.

(Goodreads does not track epub/pdf/whatever file types, DRM copy protection brands or status or other file type data or purchase links on goodreads book data pages. That type of file purchase/download/use information is for product pages on retail sites and in registering isbn and ITSC (ISO) information. Plus, can change as authors/publishers/distributors go to different formats or copy protections.)

Kindle editions are device specific (okay, device and app specific). A unique identifier in the asin number (which does not work or belong in isbn fields). If has an asin, format = "kindle edition" (or may be an audio book from audible.com). Partly the ebook rules from isbn agency on "device specific" book identifiers, partly the asin fouls the numeric isbn field (I also just personally suspect the statistically large number of kindle only publishing authors makes it easier to let kindle have own format on goodreads). Don't put "ebook" in format field if there is an asin number (format is "kindle edition" or an audible audio book).

Barnes and Noble nook a little trickier. Barnes and Noble does, too, have its own file type that is device/app specific (like kindle az files licensing technology from mobi/pocket into their proprietary format — Barnes and Noble has licensed thru Adobe Advert program to develop their own version of ePub called "pubit").

Some nook books are in Barnes and Noble device specific (file type = pubit) and have a 13-digit bnid starting with 294#. Goodreads not allowed to use their site data, but if you look at nook books under some bookcovers you will see the "pubit" logo and scroll down to see that those books have bnid 294#. Most self/indie published nook books have 294#. On goodreads, the format = "ebook" and 294# gets put in isbn13 field (leave isbn10 field blank or the purchase links for Barnes and Noble will fail). In the edition field, can note (not required) "nook edition."

Other nook books use same ebook isbn 978# used by mainstream publishers and readable on nook plus a few thousand other devices. (Usually an epub file type but not always; file type does not get specified on goodreads nor do each of the thousands of supported devices get their own editions regardless of how members are reading, that does mean that for a 978# isbn ebook it's just plain format="ebook" and nothing specified about nook edition, epub edition, smashwords edition, drm, drm-free, ADE eition, etc. for all the odd things that have been creeping into the goodreads database). On Barnes and Noble site, you will not see "pubit" displayed under bookcover for 978# isbn nook books.

Neither "ePub" nor "pubit" gets noted anywhere on goodreads book page; those are file types (and may change for isbn 978# whenever author/publisher/distributor decides). If reading in ADE, on Sony Reader, kobo or whatever—those apps, software and devices don't get noted. Just format = "ebook."

Kobo sometimes has a kobo device/app specific edition with a 13-digit identifier starting with 123#. Like the 294# nook bnid, the 123# number goes in isbn13 field, format="ebook" and can specify "kobo edition" in edition field (not required).

[almost never run across but if an author or publisher goes to the trouble of obtaining unique isbn numbers for multiple file types, then each isbn gets to have one edition, format="ebook" and edition field explaining difference (not a bad idea to librarian note so the more specific than just "ebook format" does not get edited out as against policy; extremely rare to encounter and multiple ebook editions do have to have multiple isbns). Yes, that means that mentions of epub, pdf, drm, drm-free, etc. on book pages are wrong; wrong to have an epub, pdf, mobi, etc. edition just because, for example with Smashwords, the ebook can be downloaded in that type of file—to have multi-ebook editions = have to have multi isbn/identifiers.]


message 40: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited Mar 26, 2013 11:58AM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) Cloudedleopard wrote: "This is why I said I'd rather leave the format open than the ISBN. The ISBN is a definite way of identifying a book, no matter if it has a soft cover, a hard cover or no cover at all because it's e..."

Kindle editions should use asin. No isbns. Format ="kindle edition" (never ebook).

(as already said, the isbn may not be unique identifier for the kindle edition and instead just same ebook sold multiple sites; plus not uncommon for file conversions to just convert same text as print version and forget to change the copyright page isbn from print isbn to ebook isbn unless noted). Not easy for members buying, reading or wishlisting kindle editions to even figure out the isbn; amazon site pretty much set up for asin and asin appears in ebook filenames on the kindle. Cannot imagine forcing librarians to buy (or download sample) every kindle edition to open to copyright page o find an isbn to lookup to see if only used for kindle...the asin is a unique identifier so why reinvent the wheel and go thru more hoops?


message 41: by Random (new)

Random (rand0m1s) | 620 comments Vicky wrote: "Kinde Editions get treated differently because they are the only eBooks to use the .mobi file type and .mobi files are not readable on any device other than a Kindle (unless of course you have a DR..."

I have a number of mobi books (DRM and without) that long predate the Kindle.

Honestly there really is no difference between Kindle's use of mobi and Amazon's specific DRM methos and the Nook's use of epub and BN's specific method of DRM in this context.

Note: I'm not commenting on how either of these should be listed format wise, identifier numbers, etc.


message 42: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited Mar 26, 2013 12:54PM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) I agree, no big perceivable differences (no doubt somewhere buried in trademark, copyright, and ISO info on the formats and technologies). It's the same book you are reading with possibly some extra ads or links.

Just that small bit about unique isbn and book identifying numbers allowing goodreads to list as separate editions, and for a lot of other book catalog/library/database sites and goodreads members to find/use editions. Without delving so far into ebook possibilities that thousands of devices reading on and file types available downloaded to read on those devices/apps (even more if you hack) that an ebook isbn978# from, say Penguin USA or Harper Collins, gets thousands of editions because can be read on thousands of .... Would be a mess.

Format = ebook. Each unique isbn, asin, bnid, kobo identifier, etc. can have one edition.

[If new/reprint/reissue/revision of same ebook (particulalry if all that changed was book cover) do not get new isbn/id number = new alternate cover edition and original editions are not changed. If new/reprint/reissue/revised ebook follows print book standards and gets new isbn/id, a new edition for each new isbn/id; again, the older edition does not get changed. Bookseller sites have product pages to keep updated; goodreads has book data pages and catalogs all published editions without altering what members may or may not have shelved on their "my books" even if author has a new cover.]


message 43: by Vicky (new)

Vicky (librovert) | 813 comments Random wrote: "I have a number of mobi books (DRM and without) that long predate the Kindle."

Mobi as a file has been around since 2000, yes. But Amazon bought out MobiPocket in 2005. There are some obscure/older devices that do support .mobi files (Palm OS, iLiad, etc) but as far as the main e-reader market, it's just Kindle.


message 44: by Marisa (new)

Marisa (moretta) | 565 comments I think we are mixing concepts here. We are mixing ebook formats (epub, pdf, mobi, kz8 -or something like that-), DRM flavours (mobipocket DRM, Amazon DRM, standard Adobe DRM, B&N social DRM), ebooks identifiers (ASIN, ISBN, B&N self-published ids with 13 characters), publishers (PubIt is not a format but the self-publishing B&N brand).

In short, if the ebook identifier is made of 13 characters, beginning by 9 or 2, is an ebook format, aside of file type (a lo of time ago I created different ebook editions because of different ISBN related to type, and type was a note), and it is a Kindle ebook if the identifier is ASIN. Rational? I dont't know. When have the sorting criteria been rational? ;)


message 45: by Vicky (new)

Vicky (librovert) | 813 comments Marisa wrote: "In short, if the ebook identifier is made of 13 characters, beginning by 9 or 2, is an ebook format, aside of file type (a lo of time ago I created different ebook editions because of different ISBN related to type, and type was a note), and it is a Kindle ebook if the identifier is ASIN. Rational? I dont't know. When have the sorting criteria been rational? ;)"

This is exactly what the policy dictates. This thread was created because people didn't understand WHY Kindle editions and eBooks were separate - which others are trying to explain.


message 46: by Marisa (new)

Marisa (moretta) | 565 comments Vicky wrote: "This is exactly what the policy dictates. This thread was created because people didn't understand WHY Kindle editions and eBooks were separate - which others are trying to explain."

The problem, Vicky, is that I wasn't quoting the policy :( There's no explanation aside of that, none at all.


message 47: by ❂ Jennifer (last edited Mar 26, 2013 04:52PM) (new)

❂ Jennifer  (jennevans) | 978 comments I'll throw in that using the ASIN number instead of the ISBN number makes finding the books on Amazon using the "buy" links on the book page work correctly. Same with BNID's on the B&N or Nook sites.

ETA: I've just skimmed this thread, so if this post completely misses the point, just disregard.


message 48: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited Mar 26, 2013 04:58PM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) Of no matter to what gets put in goodreads book data, but Pubit is a an ebook file type (ePub offshoot) that Barnes and Noble licensed via Avert program at Adobe of DRM and PDF fame.

Yes, it is what Barnes and Noble uses for their self publishing platform.

More technical specs and details are easier to find on Adobe Avert site than on Barnes and Noble site if anyone is that curious.

All the different download "flavors" and technical details ... Nothing to do with goodreads book pages, formats or editions. Goodreads cares about the unique identifiers like isbn, asin, etc.

Asin is format="kindle edition" (or audio book from audible.com; audio books have own rules and librarians manual section). Isbn 978# and the upcoming 9### are format="ebook"; Barnes and Noble 294# numbers are format="ebook" (can say edition="Nook edition"), kobo 123# numbers are format="ebook" (can say edition="kobo edition"); ...

Not every ebook has an isbn; if it does, its format="ebook". If it has an asin, format is never ebook.


message 49: by Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) (last edited Mar 26, 2013 05:12PM) (new)

Debbie's Spurts (D.A.) Incidentally, none of my previous posts are expressing any of my opinions on the goodreads policies.

(despite asin "uniqueness," I do find it weird that "kindle edition" only gets own format. And it's weird to me that the format says "kindle edition" instead of just "kindle" or even "kindle format." f I click to see other editions without expanding details or when combining books on a book which has a kobo 123#, isbn 978# and a nook 294# all three of those ebook editions just say "ebook" without going to the book details, expanding edition page and other loops. On a touchpad screen, tougher to hover over edition thumbnails to see details. But, that's just me who goes thru several ebook editions before finally clicking the one wanted when making librarian edits, particularly if edits are adding or correcting isbn fields.)

Splitting hairs on the wording and just "one man's opinion" — and way off topic for a thread asking what the policies are versus opinions on policy. I just had to spit it out ...


message 50: by Olivia (new)

Olivia (Croft) Debbie wrote: "Incidentally, none of my previous posts are expressing any of my opinions on the goodreads policies.

(despite asin "uniqueness," I do find it weird that "kindle edition" only gets own format. And..."


interesting


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