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Pick-a-Shelf: Monthly -Archive > 2012-03 - Classics - Post March Reviews Here

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message 1: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 8406 comments Mod
Since I'm looking for it... here it is!!


message 2: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 8406 comments Mod
Me First!

Hunger

The narrator (I don't think his true name was told) is a poor man. He is unemployed yet loves to write and sometimes sells his piece of writing. He is pretty much hungry throughout the book. As the story is told in first person, it's kind of hard to decide whether he was slightly insane to begin with or if the hunger drives him insane. He has his own sets of morals that he tries very hard to uphold and what is most admirable is his generosity. Sometimes you are so touched and then other times, you just want to shake some sense into him.

An interesting piece about hunger and what it can drive a man to do yet if he is an honorable man, how far does it drive you?


message 3: by Slayermel (new)

Slayermel | 664 comments Thanks Kazza for starting the thread, I've had a rough week and just stopped in to check quick. *sigh of relief* ;op


Lyn (Readinghearts) (lsmeadows) | 2801 comments Mod
Slayermel - Sorry your week has been rough. Hope the weekend is better :)


message 5: by Slayermel (new)

Slayermel | 664 comments Thnx Lyn :0)


message 6: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 8406 comments Mod
Slayermel wrote: "Thanks Kazza for starting the thread, I've had a rough week and just stopped in to check quick. *sigh of relief* ;op"

No worries, Mel - glad to help out ;)
Hoping for a better week for you!!


message 7: by Candiss (new)

Candiss (tantara) I finished The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells. I enjoyed it and feel that it both stands the test of time and deserves the Classic label.

Here is my Goodreads review.


message 8: by Mindy (new)

Mindy | 87 comments I finished Agnes Grey. I liked it, though I probably won't read it again. Three stars.


message 9: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 8406 comments Mod
Mindy wrote: "I finished Agnes Grey. I liked it, though I probably won't read it again. Three stars."

For me, that's usually the case with most classics (ie. no re-reading) though there are some exceptions which I can count on one hand :)


message 10: by D.G. (new)

D.G. | 1370 comments The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran

Title/Author: The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran
Date finished: March 3
Rating: ★★★
Review: This is a provisional 3-star rating. I feel that although pleasant, the audio is not the best medium to enjoy this book because it doesn't give you time to think and this book definitely needs to be digested slowly so you can understand the teachings.

As an agnostic I don't have any use for the God parts but I'm more interested in the philosophical thoughts. There were things I agreed and others where I didn't, but I definitely need to revisit them to formulate my thoughts more cohesively.


message 11: by D.G. (last edited Mar 10, 2012 01:33PM) (new)

D.G. | 1370 comments For this shelf, I also read The Moving Finger by Agatha Christie. This is really a classic mystery but 15 people have filed it in the 'classics' shelf.

Like Agatha Christie herself, I consider this book one of my favorites among all the ones she wrote so in this re-read, I'm giving it 5-stars. I can't say why I like it without giving a spoiler but in my opinion, the solution for this mystery was simply brilliant.

Martin Jarvis (the narrator) did a good job portraying both the humor and the sinister atmosphere that sometimes prevailed.


message 12: by Susan (new)

Susan | 3390 comments Mod
I really don't think Doctorow's version of I, Robot belongs on the Classics shelf. Asimov's clearly does, and Doctorow's was written as a sort of homage to Asimov's, so I guess that's why people have shelved it there. I liked it ok, and gave it 3 stars. My review here .


message 13: by Mindy (new)

Mindy | 87 comments I finished The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins. I really liked it and gave it 4 stars. I liked how the book was written with the different narrators. Plus the music from that old 1944 movie "Laura" was playing in my head almost the entire time which added a perfect atmospheric touch. The only thing I didn't really like was the ending with the Count.


message 14: by Mindy (new)

Mindy | 87 comments I just finished Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. I really thought I would like this one better than I did, but only gave it 2 stars. I did not like the writing style. I felt like it was very melodramatic and really just wanted to pound the idea into me, rather like that wall of televisions that made so much sound and noise that you couldn't fight back. I felt assaulted rather than that I should think about the possiblities of such a society.


message 15: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 8406 comments Mod
Mindy wrote: "I finished The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins. I really liked it and gave it 4 stars. I liked how the book was written with the different narrators. Plus the music from that old 19..."

I only read this a few months ago and I was surprised that I actually liked it (I wasn't expecting to) and also how easy to read it was (well, easier than I expected too) so really it just exceeded my expectations. Re: the Count, I think he's got what's coming for him :)


message 16: by Mindy (new)

Mindy | 87 comments Kazza wrote: "Mindy wrote: "I finished The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins. I really liked it and gave it 4 stars. I liked how the book was written with the different narrators. Plus the music fr..."

I wish he could have ended by British justice though!


message 17: by KarenF (new)

KarenF (cleocleveland) | 66 comments I finished listening to The Murder of Roger Ackroyd.

At first I was distracted by the narrator as I have mostly been listening to David Suchet as Poirot. However, Agatha Christie rarely tells a boring tale so I was soon caught up in the story. (view spoiler).

I'm usually in dire need of an editor in my reviews as I tend to yammer on about books in general. But I gave this one 5*s and my review was one line: In which Dame Agatha schools us all on the banality of evil.


message 18: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 286 comments I finished Brave New World on the weekend. It's also a LOST read and a snakes and ladders so I get to tick off a few things.

This was a thought provoking story about the possibilities of social control gone to extremes. I connected with the character of Bernard Marx and his sense of feeling different from those around him. Although the situation in the novel is extreme and so far removed from what could actually happen, I think it is a good study of how free thinkers are sometimes perceived as dangerous, or of how difficult it is for an introvert to conform to an extroverted world.
I'd give it 3.5 - 4 stars


message 19: by Bea (last edited Mar 13, 2012 07:44PM) (new)

Bea | 4358 comments Mod
I read The Old Man and the Sea. What a wonderful story of perseverence and determination! I gave it 5 stars. Definitely a classic story.


message 20: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 8406 comments Mod
Bea wrote: "I read The Old Man and the Sea. What a wonderful story of perseverence and determination! I gave it 5 stars. Definitely a classic story."

That was really interesting, wasn't it, Bea? I just couldn't believe that a book about fishing could be so engaging.


message 21: by Bea (new)

Bea | 4358 comments Mod
Kazza wrote: "Bea wrote: "I read The Old Man and the Sea. What a wonderful story of perseverence and determination! I gave it 5 stars. Definitely a classic story."

That was really interesting, wa..."


I was amazed, Kazza. I never thought it would engage me like it did!


message 22: by Tara (new)

Tara | 742 comments I read The Mystery of Edwin Drood. It was the book Charles Dickens was writing when he died. I think that if you were a Dickens fan you may like it. I have never really considered myself a fan and have only read A Christmas Carol and I liked parts of it... but did not like the pacing (which could be because he planned on writing more... I am not sure). I think it was probably not the best book for a Dickens novice.


message 24: by Susan (new)

Susan | 3390 comments Mod
I'm not sure why someone would shelve Pillars of the Earth on Classics -- maybe because it's historical fiction, or maybe because they expect it to become a classic. In any case, it's there.

I really enjoyed it, and gave it 4 stars. My review here .


message 25: by Sarah (new)

Sarah | 286 comments I found that my snakes and ladders read The Borrowers was also listed on Classics, although I think it is a little early to be classed as a classic it probably will continue to stand the test of time.
4 stars


message 26: by Scott (last edited Mar 20, 2012 09:18PM) (new)

Scott Wrapped up Heart of Darkness. My thoughts here. Now to figure out what's next.


message 27: by Vivian (new)

Vivian (_vivian) | 192 comments I loved the Borrowers when I was younger. Used to blame them whenever I lost anything, hehe.

I tried reading The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes but after two short stories, I felt like I got the idea. Sherlock receives a strange case, allows Watson to tag along just to show off his brilliance. He solves the case with clues the reader is not given, like by looking at a person's shoelace, and Watson faints in amazement. It was a DNF, but going to try for anther one before the end of the month.


message 28: by LynnB (last edited Mar 23, 2012 06:51PM) (new)

LynnB | 1594 comments I loved Carry On, Jeeves by PG Wodehouse. It was such a hoot to read! It was written in 1925 about an aristocratic man and his butler and has well-stood the test of time for a humorous read.


message 29: by Bea (last edited Mar 24, 2012 07:23AM) (new)

Bea | 4358 comments Mod
Finished Giovanni's Room. Gave it 2*.

Since it was published in the 50's, I see why it is now a classic as it addresses the morality and struggle of a young man in Paris figuring out his own sexuality, and torn between his idea of a man - with wife and kids - and love of another man.

I just did not connect with the angst and monologue-style of the writing. It seemed less a story to me than the writer working out his own thoughts.

I was tempted more than once to abandon it and really disappointed that it took me all week to read 169 pages!

Now to get back to a book with story. I need an escape!!!


message 30: by Coralie (new)

Coralie | 1580 comments I have finally finished Middlemarch and gave it 4 stars. I liked the way it looked past the romance to the marriages. So many authors seem to be able to describe failed marriages but not successful ones. George Eliot manages both superbly.


message 31: by Susan (new)

Susan | 3390 comments Mod
Bea wrote: "Finished Giovanni's Room. Gave it 2*.

Since it was published in the 50's, I see why it is now a classic as it addresses the morality and struggle of a young man in Paris figuring ou..."


Bea, that's just how I felt ab out The Immoralist.


message 32: by Susan (last edited Mar 25, 2012 08:26AM) (new)

Susan | 3390 comments Mod
The God Project is another of those books I don't believe should be on the classics shelf, because it's not that good. But it's there. I gave it 3 stars. My review here .


message 33: by Bea (new)

Bea | 4358 comments Mod
I finished The Catcher in the Rye. I gave it 2*. It is a story of a young man who flunks out of boy's school and goes home several days before the term is over. Well, he goes to his home city, NYC, but he does not go home. The whole book is his ramblings and wanderings about his life and the people he knows. He is without goals or purpose. It was depressing and sad. I do not see why this book has become a classic. Although I noticed that it was written in 1945, so maybe this book reflects how lost and pointless life seemed to be at that time. Who knows?


message 34: by Tien (new)

Tien (tiensblurb) | 8406 comments Mod
I didn't particularly enjoy that book either, Bea.

Although I thought that he was probably suffering from depression? But no one (in the book) caught on to that fact?


message 35: by Vi (new)

Vi | 123 comments Late update but I finished I, Robot by Isaac Asimov. It's a collection of short stories but I loved how Asimov wrote the evolution of robots. I also liked the Three laws and how it played out. I'll be checking out more books of his for sure.


message 36: by Luann (new)

Luann (azbookgal) | 1004 comments That's how I felt about The Catcher in the Rye, too, Bea. I couldn't figure out why it is considered a classic and why some people list it as their top favorite book. I didn't like it much at all.

I did read a classic in March, but just now wrote my review. I read and LOVED Heidi by Johanna Spyri. I'm so glad I finally read it! Read my review here.


message 37: by Susan (new)

Susan | 3390 comments Mod
I started To the Lighthouse in March for classics month, but didn't finish it until Apr. 1. It's short, but I found it very slow going, and didn't like it very much. My review here .


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