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The Night Circus
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GJR The Night Circus Discussion

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Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
Why did you chose to read this book? Is the subject matter something you'd normally read? If not, what drew you to it?


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
What was your favorite part of the circus? Which character would you most want to meet? Which tent would you most want to visit? Which food sounded most appealing?


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
Chandresh is portrayed as a brilliant and creative perfectionist at the beginning of the novel, yet he slowly unravels as the competition matures. Is Chandresh merely a puppet of the competition—used solely for his ability to provide a venue for the competition—or do his contributions run deeper?


Farin (missfarin) | 4 comments Julie wrote: "Why did you chose to read this book? Is the subject matter something you'd normally read? If not, what drew you to it?"

I chose to read 'The Night Circus' because there was all of this great buzz surrounding it. I knew I had to read it when I checked out the flap copy; it sounded like a cross between historical fiction and fantasy, with a little 'Water for Elephants' thrown in. Not to mention the cover art is fantastic!


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
Farin wrote: "Julie wrote: "Why did you chose to read this book? Is the subject matter something you'd normally read? If not, what drew you to it?"

I chose to read 'The Night Circus' because there was all of th..."


I think that's why we chose it too because of the buzz. I think the cover is fantastic. I hope that they do it justice when it come out in paperback.
This is definitely up my alley genre wise but sometimes when something has a lot of buzz it doesn't always live up.


message 6: by Farin (last edited Mar 01, 2012 09:39AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Farin (missfarin) | 4 comments Julie wrote: "Farin wrote: "Julie wrote: "Why did you chose to read this book? Is the subject matter something you'd normally read? If not, what drew you to it?"

I chose to read 'The Night Circus' because the..."


Of course! There's always risk that a book with a lot of hype behind it will fall short of expectations, which makes the ones that do so special, and this is one of those. I'm hoping they do a lovely paperback cover too, because that's the edition I plan to buy. Is there a release date on that, incidentally? I should look...

UPDATE: Paperback will be out in June.


Farin (missfarin) | 4 comments Julie wrote: "Chandresh is portrayed as a brilliant and creative perfectionist at the beginning of the novel, yet he slowly unravels as the competition matures. Is Chandresh merely a puppet of the competition—us..."

I feel like he was used the entire time, first by Prospero and Alexander for his ability to create an incredible show and for his connections to extraordinary performers, and then by Marco because he owned the circus. It was kind of sad to watch him deteriorate.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Julie wrote: "Why did you chose to read this book? Is the subject matter something you'd normally read? If not, what drew you to it?"

Honestly, if it weren't for our challenge I might not have picked this one up, even though it looked interesting and the hype was high... I'm so glad I read it.

It's going on my list of all time favorites!


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Julie wrote: "What was your favorite part of the circus?"

Honestly, I couldn't pick a tent, it all sounded so amazing... beyond amazing really. I would love the mazes and labryinths. Might steer clear of the ice garden (I hate the cold). With Celia & Isobel would probably be where you'd find me most, though.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Farin wrote: "Julie wrote: "Chandresh is portrayed as a brilliant and creative perfectionist at the beginning of the novel, yet he slowly unravels as the competition matures. Is Chandresh merely a puppet of the ..."

Farin wrote: "I feel like he was used the entire time, first by Prospero and Alexander for his ability to create an incredible show and for his connections to extraordinary performers, and then by Marco because he owned the circus. It was kind of sad to watch him deteriorate. "

I thought so too. Sad to see Tara deteriorate.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
I wondered about the fact that the twins grew even with the suspension and protection from Marco... were their abilities a side effect of the fire spell?


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
Jennifer wrote: "I wondered about the fact that the twins grew even with the suspension and protection from Marco... were their abilities a side effect of the fire spell?"

I thought they were. That because they hadn't been born yet, the spell affected them differently.


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
Jennifer wrote: "Farin wrote: "Julie wrote: "Chandresh is portrayed as a brilliant and creative perfectionist at the beginning of the novel, yet he slowly unravels as the competition matures. Is Chandresh merely a ..."

I did like at the end where Poppett restored his mind to something that was useful to him again.


Shruti | 1 comments Jennifer wrote: "I wondered about the fact that the twins grew even with the suspension and protection from Marco... were their abilities a side effect of the fire spell?"

That's the conclusion that I came to. Their birth at the time of the fire spell gave them powers.


message 15: by Jennifer (last edited Mar 01, 2012 01:48PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Has anyone visited Erin Morgenstern's website?

Have you seen this?!?

http://www.nightcircus.co.uk/


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Julie wrote: "I did like at the end where Poppett restored his mind to something that was useful to him again.
"


I agree. I think Marco would have done too, given the opportunity.


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
Jennifer wrote: "Has anyone visited Ms. Morgenstern's website?

Have you seen this?!?

http://www.nightcircus.co.uk/"


Just signed up. :)


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
Jennifer wrote: "Julie wrote: "I did like at the end where Poppett restored his mind to something that was useful to him again.
"

I agree. I think Marco would have done too, given the opportunity."


Perhaps but I think it was Poppets job so to say.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Did you feel sorry for those who were being used in the game -- Isobel, the Burgess sisters, even Celia and Marco? Why do you think some people, like Mr. Barris, don't mind being trapped by the circus while it drives others, like Tara Burgess, mad?


Deborah | 4 comments I was drawn to this book by the premise underlying it -- plus the fact that Girls Just Reading chose it as something that might lend itself to engaging discussion. As a fiction writer myself, I'm certainly curious about books that have a certain 'buzz' about them. Not all buzzworthy books make me want to read them. This one did.


Deborah | 4 comments My favorite part of the circus was its dreamlike quality. The chapters in the book, especially early on, are short -- much in the way dreams take hold. If this was not deliberate on the part of the author, all the more power to the nature of the unconscious.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Deborah wrote: "My favorite part of the circus was its dreamlike quality. The chapters in the book, especially early on, are short -- much in the way dreams take hold. If this was not deliberate on the part of t..."

I loved the little one page descriptions in between too... an outsiders perspective.


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
In general this book made me feel lost in a world that I hadn't experienced since Harry Potter. I loved the imagery of it. I wanted to stay there.

I think for a young adult who adored Harry Potter, they could definitely read and understand this novel. I really can't recommend it enough.


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
Jennifer wrote: "Did you feel sorry for those who were being used in the game -- Isobel, the Burgess sisters, even Celia and Marco? Why do you think some people, like Mr. Barris, don't mind being trapped by the cir..."

I don't know if I felt sorry for them because I think they all got something from it as well. I wondered if Alexander did something to make Tara step in front of that train, since he was still present when it happened.

I loved the reveal of Kiko towards the end. THat was something I really didn't expect.


Farin (missfarin) | 4 comments Julie wrote: "Jennifer wrote: "Did you feel sorry for those who were being used in the game -- Isobel, the Burgess sisters, even Celia and Marco? Why do you think some people, like Mr. Barris, don't mind being t..."

Yes, Kiko was a complete surprise!

I don't know if I felt sorry for them either. Where Celia and Marco were concerned, it was more like frustration on their behalf, because they were forced to be a part of this game, and it took them so long to find a way out.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Farin wrote: "Julie wrote: "Jennifer wrote: "Did you feel sorry for those who were being used in the game -- Isobel, the Burgess sisters, even Celia and Marco? Why do you think some people, like Mr. Barris, don'..."

Yes, I love that reveal too.

I felt sorry for the people on the outside; while they may have gained from it, they didn't fully benefit from it as the performers did, or truly understand it, with the exception of Mr. Barris.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Julie wrote: "I loved the reveal of Kiko towards the end. THat was something I really didn't expect.


...and as soon as it was revealed, you understood her character so completely, like a veil had been lifted.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
"Why does the man in the grey suit feel so passionate about stories? What sort of commentary do you think the chapter "Stories" is on the novel? On life?"


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
Jennifer wrote: ""Why does the man in the grey suit feel so passionate about stories? What sort of commentary do you think the chapter "Stories" is on the novel? On life?""

Well because he's probably created his share of stories along with Hector. Isn't life really just a series of stories that are somehow connected to each other? I think so. I think we all have our own story but the stories of our parents and others help shape ours. :)


Deborah | 4 comments I think the chapter on stories is a perfect binding (couldn't resist that) to wrap up the novel. Early in the novel, Bailey rues the fact that it is (mostly) girls who are swept from their mundane lives by knights, etc. This was a clear setup to suggest that the nature of stories/storytelling would be an undercurrent. Yes, it takes a certain suspension of belief to be caught up in a story premised on 'magic'. At the same time, the novel's interplay between the 'night' circus and the 'daytime' world plays with our perception of reality, not to mention the pure power of imagination.


Deborah | 4 comments A hearty 'yes' to the Harry Potter reminder. I have to say, too, that there was something kind of magical about reading it on an iPad. Pages turn at the touch of a finger. Anybody besides me amused/tickled by the cyberspace Widget and Poppet allusions?


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Deborah wrote: "I think the chapter on stories is a perfect binding (couldn't resist that) to wrap up the novel. Early in the novel, Bailey rues the fact that it is (mostly) girls who are swept from their mundane ..."
Beautifully put.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Julie wrote: "Jennifer wrote: ""Why does the man in the grey suit feel so passionate about stories? What sort of commentary do you think the chapter "Stories" is on the novel? On life?""

Well because he's pro..."


I agree. plus at this point in his long life, all he has left are stories... with very little attachment to reality.


Alice Bola (forsix) | 1 comments Mod
Julie wrote: "Why did you chose to read this book? Is the subject matter something you'd normally read? If not, what drew you to it?"

I wanted to read this book because I reminded me of Water for Elephants (which is my all time favorite book). Although I still thing Water for Elephants is better than The Night Circus, I really enjoyed this novel. It was more on the fantasy realm than I thought it would be, but I loved it just the same. There really was something incredibly magical about this novel.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
"Why are Frederick Thiessen and the reveurs important to the story? Why do you think some people were so entranced by the circus that they devoted themselves to following it around?"


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
I figured the reveurs early "deadheads". LOL They were groupies in a sense and loved experiencing the circus and seeing if they could find something new on each visit.

They were important because they had an outsiders inside perspective of the circus. They could describe it with authenticity because they knew it so well.


message 37: by Amy (new) - rated it 4 stars

Amy | 1 comments I was drawn to this story just because of the level of imagination involved. I really liked it. It was one of those great stories where you could imagine the whole world in your head. I wouldn't mind seeing it as a movie though.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Amy wrote: "It was one of those great stories where you could imagine the whole world in your head. I wouldn't mind seeing it as a movie though. "

I don't know if I want to see a movie of this. I don't know if anything could ever do it justice...


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
I'm on the fence about if I want it as a movie or not. I think in the right hands it could be just as magical as Harry Potter.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
So much of the gestures were symbolic... creating magic and in response to each other... too much dialogue could ruin that... as could not enough subtlty... it definitely could be amazing, in the right hands.


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
Jennifer wrote: "So much of the gestures were symbolic... creating magic and in response to each other... too much dialogue could ruin that... as could not enough subtlty... it definitely could be amazing, in the r..."

Totally agree.


message 42: by Judy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Judy (bigfootgal) | 2 comments Julie wrote: "Why did you chose to read this book? Is the subject matter something you'd normally read? If not, what drew you to it?"

I get most of my books from Audible.com and Night Circus was featured there. I like stories of magic so it interested me. Also, I was heavily influenced by the fact that Jim Dale is the reader. He does a great job.


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
I loved Jim Dale. He would be perfect for this novel.


message 44: by Judy (new) - rated it 3 stars

Judy (bigfootgal) | 2 comments He does a wonderful job of giving each character his/her own voice. Really brings the book to life.


Rose Ann I was intrigued by the description. A circus that only came out at night...
I loved this book! So descriptive without it being overbearing.
I don't know that I have a favorite room, but I would love to see the clock!! I loved all the rooms.
It was just so well written! I read this a few months ago, and I still do not want to read another book related to a circus. I'm afraid it will tarnish what I loved with Night Circus.


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
Rose Ann - Did you ever read Water for Elephants? It's about a circus but so different from The Night Circus. More real circumstances about traveling circuses. It's one of my favorites.


Rose Ann I own a copy, but haven't read it yet. My mother keeps telling me I should read it.


Julie (juliejustreads) | 25 comments Mod
It is excellent. I didn't want to read a book about a circus but I loved it. I still need to see the movie.


Jennifer (jennjustreading) | 22 comments Mod
Rose Ann, we also highly recommend any of Sarah Addison Allen's books too. Great magical realism.


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