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Maybe With a Chance of Certainty (Tales from Foster High, #1)
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message 2: by Kaje (last edited Feb 29, 2012 10:07PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kaje Harper | 16510 comments This month the book we will read by our featured author is Maybe With a Chance of Certainty (Tales of Foster High #1) by John Goode .

"Kyle has worked hard at being the invisible student, toiling through high school in the middle of Nowhere, Texas. Brad is the baseball star at Foster High. Both boys are damaged in ways that the rest of the world can’t see. When they bond over a night of history tutoring, Kyle thinks that maybe his life has taken a turn for the not-so-lonely.

He finds out quickly that the promise of fairy-tale love is a lie when you’re gay and falling for one of the most popular boys in school, and if being different is a sin in high school, then being gay is the biggest sin of all. Now Kyle and Brad need to come to an understanding amidst the scrutiny of their peers or their fledgling relationship will crash and burn before it ever gets off the ground."

This is the first book in the "Tales from Foster High" series.


message 3: by Kaje (last edited Mar 03, 2012 09:33PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kaje Harper | 16510 comments So besides having a great title, Maybe With a Chance of Certainty is a fun read with a wry, bright and engaging narrator, Kyle. He's pretty insightful too, although occasionally his insight went further into the vehicle analogies than I could follow. The up-and-down swings of hope and despair that Kyle went through were very realistic for high-school to me. The all-around perfect boy Brad turns out to have some feet of clay. And the resolution is satisfying. There are some great lines, which I am not going to quote so I don't spoil them for you. I really enjoyed this short novel.

I will say I'm glad there is a sequel though. Because as I closed the book, enjoying the Happy For Now moment, I thought to myself, this is where the really interesting and difficult part begins for these boys. I'm looking forward to getting the sequel and finding out how that works out for them.

For those who are debating whether they have time to read this now, it is quite a short and quick read. There is a small amount of on-page sex in this book, but not too much for older teens in my opinion.


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments Alright--I am a third of the way through.

Note to Mr. Goode:

Dear Sir,

Please inform your area police that you have a stalker. Full stop. Also let them know she is a 51 year old mother of 2 who passionately loves YA GLBT where they allow her to moderate under strict supervision and whilst wearing an ankle monitor so her whereabouts can be checked often. full stop. Lastly, be aware that she is a gusher often found wielding phrases like:

"OMG--this is BRILLIANT!!!"

"Holy Crap--I feel like I'm back in high school and I want to wrap up Kyle and take him home with me."

"Dear god I have never laughed so hard--I practically wet myself!"

Please be aware Sir, that this stalker is known for her endless questions and almost laser like ability to make you feel the full brunt of her hero worship.

Sincerely yours,

You new stalker, Sammy

I have a book to finish reading now--but never fear I shall be back!


Debbie Sammy2006 wrote: "Alright--I am a third of the way through.

Note to Mr. Goode:

Dear Sir,

Please inform your area police that you have a stalker. Full stop. Also let them know she is a 51 year old mother of 2 wh..."


Sammy you are freaking hilarious. Yep, *sighs* finding a new book you super love is like:

Photobucket


message 6: by Sammy Goode (last edited Mar 04, 2012 08:10AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Sammy Goode | 5380 comments "I don't remember the moment I knew I was broken...but I do recall when I started to understand that it might be okay. It was the moment I fell in love with the boy with the green eyes." (Kyle, Maybe With a Chance of Certainty)


Dear Mr. Goode,

I am in love. No, don't thank me--just sit back and bask in the glow.

Your stalker,

Sammy


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments "The thought of being gay gave me the chills. Not because of what I thought of it but because of what others would...I wasn't normal, and no matter how hard I tried, I was never going to be. And though I didn't hear it at the time, a small part of me exclaimed, "Good!" (Kyle)

I cannot express how truly remarkable this book is---I am almost finished---and I think I am going to be unable to speak for a bit after I am through--yes--it is simply put, "THAT good".


message 8: by Sammy Goode (last edited Mar 04, 2012 10:00AM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Sammy Goode | 5380 comments I'm sorry--I just can't stop--this...well this is genius!

"We are told in fairy tales that evil always loses and good eventually will triumph. That is what makes those stories so desirable to the general population. They want to believe that karma works and the bad guys are always defeated in the end. But in a world where no one thinks that they are the bad guy and everyone plays the victim, it is harder and harder to find the black and the white of a situation. We are all the hero, and we are all the monster. It just depends on which way you look at it." (Kyle)

What a stunning and insightful social commentary on the way we think---again, amazingly brilliant.


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments "I don't remember the moment I knew I was broken...but I do know the moment I began to feel fixed. It was the day the green-eyed boy fell in love with me." (Kyle)

I forewarned you at the beginning Mr. Goode...I tried to tell you what I was--a gusher. Well, sit back, cause I am about to pour.

This book is, in my opinion, a must read for any young man or woman struggling to make their way in this world. It is a hand placed carefully, lovingly on the shoulder of a nation of broken teens whose thoughts gravitate toward suicide, and self-doubt, despair and self-loathing...it is a whisper into their fragile hearts and worried minds that says, I know you...I see you...I want you to know...you are not alone.

This book is never glib or self-important but it is humorous and self-aware. This book is never trite or condescending but it does dare to look at the smallest of fears and bring them into the light and it does meet us right at the emotional level we live and it says we have the right to live there, to feel as we do.

This book, this sweet moment of a life that has been so trapped in fear and so relentlessly battered cries out that each one of us deserves the chance to be happy, deserves the right to be cherished, deserves the right to live without fear.

This work of yours does not give sweet and bland euphemisms for the feelings that real teens experience every day. It does not look at the sometimes hellish place high school can be for so many and paint it with a fairy tale brush. It does not demand that we "get over it" and move on because "someone else always has it worse than us". No, this books says, your life is important...your pain is real...your story is one worth telling...one I want to hear.

This book, your story, John, allows us to see how people can be standing right in front of us and we can miss it--miss their pain, miss their hurt, miss them completely if we never stop and take the moment to look, really look and see who they are, how beautiful they are, how special they are.

Every once in a while, a novel comes along and it grabs us and shakes us to our very core. And after we have finished, we understand that we have been made just a bit better by the reading of it...that we have been made just a bit richer because of it, that we have been shown truth and love in its purest form. That is what your novel has done for me.

Thank you. I cannot sum it up in any more appropriate way than to say simply, thank you. Thank you for this gift, your novel.


message 10: by Indie Reviews (last edited Mar 04, 2012 01:19PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Indie Reviews | 1 comments Although I've been a member of this group for a number of months, I've never posted. But your featuring of author John Goode for the month of March and discussion of his debut novella Maybe With A Chance of Certainty has coaxed me out of my lurkdom and silence.

I recently read and reviewed this novella and yes I too fell in love with Mr. Goode's writing and in particular his characterisation. I read across most sub-genres, including YA, and what I loved about this story the most (along with the overall writing) is the respect and care with which Mr. Goode has written Kyle and Brad. I recommend this book to all without hesitation. Mr. Goode has joined the handful of authors that I auto-buy and I look forward to reading all of his works.


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments Indigene wrote: "Although I've been a member of this group for a number of months, I've never posted. But your featuring of author John Goode for the month of March and discussion of his debut novella Maybe With A ..."

Nice to meet you Indigene! And thanks for popping by on this one!


message 12: by John (last edited Mar 04, 2012 11:30PM) (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments Well I am pretty sure Sammy2006 is going to be my new press agent.

I was asked this weekend when I had a friend read a new book, how does one go writing for a genre (m/m) that seems to be read by predominantly females.

I said I don't know.

She asked how does one write a gay coming of age story when the majority of people reading it is straight?

I said I don't know.

She asked what I did know.

I know who wrote the book of love, I know how many licks it takes to get to the center of one of those horrible suckers. I know that love is real, even if I haven't seen it with my own eyes, kinda like Bigfoot. I know just because something is fictitious does not mean it isn't real. I know there are more things things in heaven and earth than are dreamt of in my philosophy, but it still means I won't find anything good on TV. I know that hatred is fleeting and too strong an emotion to maintain. I know few of us grow old, that more times that naught our youth is taken from us kicking and screaming one piece at a time. I think that dog who slept on his back on a doghouse and the bird who made no sense were partners but could never show it.

And I think in the core of us all, where the real us live, we are all the same. We all hurt, we all cry, we all want, and we all never get it. Straight, gay, woman, man, dog, bird, we all are wanting and never more so than in that fragile time of high school. I know this because I once saw a brain, an athlete, a princess, a criminal and a basket case eat lunch together and it changed my life.

The trick to writing is to one, make the words make sense (not as easy as it sounds) and two, tell the truth. Not YOUR truth all the time, but the truth. You tell the truth and people will find their own truth in it, John Hughes taught me that.

Thank you for your kinds words, the check is in the mail Sammy :)


message 13: by John (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments Kaje wrote: "So besides having a great title, Maybe With a Chance of Certainty is a fun read with a wry, bright and engaging narrator, Kyle. He's pretty insightful too, although occasionally hi..."

I am actually editing the third book now and then going back, and editing the all three to make a hardcover edition of this for ONLY young adult readers. When I do I am taking the sex out or at least the explicit describers of it. I was not a fan of it :)


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments John wrote: "Well I am pretty sure Sammy2006 is going to be my new press agent.

I was asked this weekend when I had a friend read a new book, how does one go writing for a genre (m/m) that seems to be read by ..."


OMG--I want to carry your child--LOL!!!!! God even your responses to insanity are eloquent and poetic--who are you??? Okay--I have to go to work now--but I will be back--stalkers always return you know--and this time with questions--get ready--we are going to chat--and honestly? I'm taking notes--cause your responses are just too damned amazing not to remember!


message 15: by Jo (new)

Jo Ramsey (Jo_Ramsey) | 1017 comments I loved this story; I read it a few weeks ago. I wanted to clobber Brad a couple times; I loved Kyle and wanted him to have his happy ending.

(And I have a soft spot for any character named Kyle, as long as it's a nice guy, since that's the name of my favorite character from the adult romances I write.)

You present Kyle's story so well, John. Thank you for writing it. I'm glad to see there's going to be a hard-cover version with less explicit content; there was a scene in Maybe that made me question the young-adultness of it. Plus with a hardcover edition, I'll be able to share the stories with my 16-year-old, who isn't allowed to touch my Kindle. :)


message 16: by Kaje (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kaje Harper | 16510 comments John wrote: "I am actually editing the third book now and then going back, and editing the all three to make a hardcover edition of this for ONLY young adult readers. When I do I am taking the sex out or at least the explicit describers of it. I was not a fan of it :)
..."


I think this is great - I wouldn't take out the sex entirely - YA books need to get real about the fact that teens have sex. But a small ramp down in the explicitness would open doors. I would like to see this in highschools and libraries.


I know who wrote the book of love, I know how many licks it takes to get to the center of one of those horrible suckers. I know that love is real, even if I haven't seen it with my own eyes, kinda like Bigfoot. I know just because something is fictitious does not mean it isn't real...

This is why I read your blog and was a fan even before I had read this book. You do know how to say it so well.


message 17: by K (new) - rated it 4 stars

K (k-polipetl) | 4090 comments I don't know, with all these positive reviews and comments I might just have downloaded both this story and the sequel to the Kindle... and I have Parrotfish arriving in the post.....

Too many books, so little time


message 18: by Kaje (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kaje Harper | 16510 comments K wrote: "I don't know, with all these positive reviews and comments I might just have downloaded both this story and the sequel to the Kindle... and I have Parrotfish arriving in the post.....

Too many b..."


It's a good/bad thing that John's books are short.


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments OK.

First dear author...was the character of Kyle or Brad in any way a little similar to you at that age?

You made both of your MC's come from abusive homes--it made them both remarkably resilient and fragile at the same time---can you talk about how writing for a character who has experienced abuse like that required a deft hand??

Did you feel the need to research or connect with real life teens who had and or were living a life similar to that of Kyle or Brad in order to do them justice?

Finally, was there a "table" at your high school--and did you ever sit at it either in defiance or as an accepted member?

Thanks for considering my questions!


message 20: by John (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments First dear author...was the character of Kyle or Brad in any way a little similar to you at that age?

I wish. I was nothing like Kyle as I could never keep my mouth shut. My mom worked at a local store always used to ask people who came through if she knew her son and every single one of them would say oh yeah I know him, he's cool. I did not know one of them.

Yet I was completely an outcast so could never be Brad. Never got into sports, the physical contact was just too much like a real fight and to do it for pleasure or recreation seemed insane. Kyle is the guy I would love to be, Brad is the guy I would love to date.

You made both of your MC's come from abusive homes--it made them both remarkably resilient and fragile at the same time---can you talk about how writing for a character who has experienced abuse like that required a deft hand??

Writing characters who are broken or come from abused homes are easy when you come from one yourself. I think everyone has bad spots growing up and everyone thinks theirs is the worst because it is happening to them. I never once thought my childhood was the worst, I just know I never liked it but never felt sorry for myself. There is no profit in misery for things you cannot change, or as my friend always told me, If you want to feel sorry for yourself let's walk outside and ask three random people to tell you about their lives. I bet you find three sadder stories than your own.

Did you feel the need to research or connect with real life teens who had and or were living a life similar to that of Kyle or Brad in order to do them justice?

Believe it or not I know a lot of teens and like way too much of the same things they like. My friend's son is 17 and we ended up at a party for his mom's work one night and we were both stupid bored. So we started thumbing through each others Ipod and besides the 80's classics, I had just about everything he had. He added afterwards, if I was his age we'd hang. I thought that was epic. Also, I have seen every Twilight movie even though they suck comapred to the books and the books suck compared to...um...a lot of things.

But I love me some Jacob.

Finally, was there a "table" at your high school--and did you ever sit at it either in defiance or as an accepted member?

There was indeed two tables. One outside for the cool kids and one inside for the nerds. I never once sat or wanted to sit at the cool table and always sat at the nerd table with the rest of my friends. Even if popular people walked by and said "Hey dude." like they knew me all the time. My friends never quite understood this, and I never have.

Hey I live for questions. Well not live, I mean I live because there is oxygen pumping to my brain so I live for oxygen, though kind of boring is more correct and does nothing to add to the discussion so though I do not literally live for questions, I do not mind and actually like answering them.

Though oxygen is kinda cool too, just saying.


message 21: by Kaje (last edited Mar 05, 2012 01:55PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kaje Harper | 16510 comments Dear author, (I like that, obviates the choice of how to address someone) - Did you know right from the start you were going to have Brad stand up for Kyle and out himself at the end? Or were you surprised when your character had the guts to do that at that moment?

I ask because I wasn't sure as I was reading it which way it would go, especially given a sequel or two to work it out in, and Brad's wavering.


message 22: by John (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments I actually had the first three books already in my head. When I submitted the first novel the second was almost halfway done and by the time I got the contract back was done with it. Brad is a much more complex character than most people give him credit for. The majority of complaints, after the car metaphor, was about Brad and not being able to like him. I heard more than once that his "reveal" at the end came out of nowhere and was uncharacteristic.

Let's skip the fact someone is going to tell me what is and is out of character for someone I made up and move right to the part about that until you read the second book, which is from Brad's POV, you really don't know what is going on in his head.

That is the whole point of the books to be honest. Most I have seen come from the nerd POV and is their struggle to be accepted and all that but Foster is about everyone and that the people you "see" are not he people you know until you are inside their head.

You know, like real life :)


message 23: by Kaje (last edited Mar 05, 2012 04:29PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kaje Harper | 16510 comments John wrote: "I actually had the first three books already in my head. When I submitted the first novel the second was almost halfway done and by the time I got the contract back was done with it. Brad is a much..."

I didn't think it was out of character, but I could alternatively have seen it taking him just a little longer, maybe being shocked into not doing it then, and then standing up soon after, when Kyle was no longer hoping for it. So I was wondering if the character caught you by surprise, as mine sometimes do me in the writing. I liked Brad, I had the feeling that he had a lot of demons down under the surface. I look forward to getting into the second book and finding out more about him.


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments Dear Author,

I noticed you avoided the "kicky" sidekick--most usually a girl that a LOT of gay characters have as their best friend! Speaking from experience--yes, dear lord I was one of "those" kicky sidekicks--still am in fact, what made you forgo that "element"??

In fact, what made you forgo any sympathetic side female characters??--unless Brad's "girlfriend" would qualify here?

(Which by the way was a stroke of genius--and I refer here to the way Brad introduced her--I truly almost fell off my living room couch when that little bomb exploded!)

Secondly, the confrontation between the Principal and Kyle--Kyle's emancipation, so to speak. First it was so forceful--almost gut-wrenching in how much was revealed about the way Kyle thinks--about the depth of his emotional pain--where did that come from?? Was it from your gut--your experiences?? Not the setting--the characters---but really the sentiments--the beliefs expressed in the chat---sorry--does that make sense??

(As your self-proclaimed stalker I could always drop by and explain in person, if you like=:)


message 25: by John (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments In fact, what made you forgo any sympathetic side female characters??--unless Brad's "girlfriend" would qualify here?

Well where I come from they are called fag hags and I have never really been a fan myself. I have friends that are girls, always have in fact but the idea that all gay men growing up have a girl they are BFF's with because they relate better has never been my experience. I have always had a ton of straight, male friends who never once had a problem with the fact I liked guys. In my new book the main character has a best friend that is a female, but that was more of a plot point than just thinking of adding a girl.

I love strong women characters, and when the story calls for them I love including them. But this is a story about Kyle and Brad and the people that directly effect them. There wasn't a girl around, so didn't bother to put one in. But there is a character that is added in book three that has a bigger role in book four and she is pretty cool :)

Secondly, the confrontation between the Principal and Kyle--Kyle's emancipation, so to speak. First it was so forceful--almost gut-wrenching in how much was revealed about the way Kyle thinks--about the depth of his emotional pain--where did that come from?? Was it from your gut--your experiences?? Not the setting--the characters---but really the sentiments--the beliefs expressed in the chat---sorry--does that make sense??

I had more than a few of those sitting downs and talking to at that age and they were all completely useless. His comeback specifically came from Empire Records where the manager of the store tries to comfort one of the employees who tried to kill herself the night before and she says to him. "You want to fix me Joe? Ok, I don't know where my mom is but when you find her can you tell me where she is? Can you fix me? Go ahead and fix me then."

I found those the best words to use in that situation.


message 26: by John (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments Also, there is a female sidekick in The Boy Behind the Red Door in the first part of the story.


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments John wrote: "In fact, what made you forgo any sympathetic side female characters??--unless Brad's "girlfriend" would qualify here?

Well where I come from they are called fag hags and I have never really been a..."


Yup! "faghag" has been used on me--it was lovely--the 4 gay men I was out dancing with confronted the drunken lout and told him exactly what that thought that type of girl was and that I wasn't one--but this is not about me so onward=:)

Kyle was the quintessential "loner" and yet, he comes pretty quickly out of that shell for Brad--did you mean for it to be that quick--that almost complete turn around from hallway skulker to he's the guy I want to hang with---or did the story motivate that--pull you along.

And the next few are personal--feel free to tell me to "stalk" elsewhere if they make you in any way uncomfortable!

1. Where do you write--anywhere, favorite place, your bathtub??

2. Do you have a day job?? Nope--don't want to know what it is--just if writing is a side deal or your current--"I'm living off of ramen and hiding from the landlord"--life style choice?

3. When did you know that you wanted to be a writer?? Was it--"hey I had a few too many beers and thought I'd write a damn good story" OR "when I turned 4 I read War and Peace and thought of ways I could improve on it"??

4. TO YA or not to YA that is the question??? I believe you have anon-YA novel(la) and no we should not mention that title here--sorry--as a mod--I would have to shut you down (LOL!) BUT, is this your favorite genre in which to work?? Your calling, so to speak??


Lastly--and this is actually just a genuine heartfelt comment like my review of the book was---you are such a good sport to let me play around here with these questions--and thank you so much for answering them! Truly!


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments Oh and John--I was in no way implying I thought you were calling me a faghag--not at all--just wanted to clear that up in case anyone reading along thought I had somehow taken offense--not at all!!


message 29: by John (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments Kyle was the quintessential "loner" and yet, he comes pretty quickly out of that shell for Brad--did you mean for it to be that quick--that almost complete turn around from hallway skulker to he's the guy I want to hang with---or did the story motivate that--pull you along.

In my opinion Kyle was a sword never drawn. He was shy because he honestly had nothing to say. As soon as he sees himself under attack and Bard being affected, he speaks up because at the heart of it, he isn't meek and cowardly. He is the hero but has no idea :)

1. Where do you write--anywhere, favorite place, your bathtub??

Usually at work, 8 hours of quiet always helps.

2. Do you have a day job?? Nope--don't want to know what it is--just if writing is a side deal or your current--"I'm living off of ramen and hiding from the landlord"--life style choice?

Yes I have a day job which is in fact a night job, graveyard. Always been a night person.

3. When did you know that you wanted to be a writer?? Was it--"hey I had a few too many beers and thought I'd write a damn good story" OR "when I turned 4 I read War and Peace and thought of ways I could improve on it"??

When I was 13 when I read The Outsiders. Changed my entire world because I thought she had to know these people or was magic because she made them up. Once i understood she made them, I wanted to be able to do that kind of magic.

4. TO YA or not to YA that is the question??? I believe you have anon-YA novel(la) and no we should not mention that title here--sorry--as a mod--I would have to shut you down (LOL!) BUT, is this your favorite genre in which to work?? Your calling, so to speak??

I am not sure what the first part of the statement meant, anon-YA novel(la) made me confused.

I love YA but not for YA sake. I think 16 Candles and Breakfast Club worked because they were movies, not teenage movies. They spoke on a universal level that even 30 years later STILL resonate with people. I like YA because I really am not in this to write a lot of hot sex lol But in the end I think the stronger stories are told from the POV we've all experienced. And in most cases, YA works for it.


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments oops--that's cause it was a typo--what I meant to say was non-YA--in other words a m/m work---sorry--I just get excited taking to my "stalkee" like this!


message 31: by John (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments The other story I have is not any more explicit than these books and it is connected to book two and three by highlighting one of the side characters and his story. I think you'd like it :)


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments "But in the end I think the stronger stories are told from the POV we've all experienced."

I really love this dear author---and quite frankly it is why this book resonated with me!

I do believe every high school has a "table" and every high school has multiple "heroes" in the making. I am so glad an author of your caliber thinks that as well!

Alright, I have talked your ear off for today--I will be back tomorrow--never fear--I have reams of questions--and you are so very gracious to answer!!!


message 33: by John (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments (tips hat)

All part of the service.


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments John wrote: "(tips hat)

All part of the service."


My god man--you are fast!!!! Yet another point in the "stalkee of the year" category!!!


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments John wrote: "The other story I have is not any more explicit than these books and it is connected to book two and three by highlighting one of the side characters and his story. I think you'd like it :)"

Oh please--need you even think about that?--LOL!!! I have it on the kindle already--in a folder marked--books I am sure to love--LOL!


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments Dear Author,

I was wondering...

How do you define Hero?

What are some of the major characteristics--the earmarks of a person you would consider a hero?

Do you consider both Kyle and Brad heroes? If so, in what way do they differ--what sets them apart as heroes--and what in their past, their present molded them into the heroes they are today?

And on a more personal note (and again, please feel free to decline to answer--but I think more than myself want to know the answers to these.)

Who are your personal heroes and why?

Was your coming out as dramatic as Kyle"s or Brad"s?


By the way--I am now stalking your blog as well--the police have been informed!


message 37: by John (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments How do you define Hero?

I am a Joesph Campbell kind of guy. The hero is the guy who takes the journey, who changes by the end, and if the one who slays the dragon.

Dragon optional.

What are some of the major characteristics--the earmarks of a person you would consider a hero?

Overcoming a personal or environmental challenge that in the end changes the character for the better by the end.

Do you consider both Kyle and Brad heroes? If so, in what way do they differ--what sets them apart as heroes--and what in their past, their present molded them into the heroes they are today?

I consider them both heroes in the fact that they are faced with a major change to their lives and are forced with the question, hide or reveal. Both of them have different things to lose if they make the wrong choice and they have different mindsets to get there.

And on a more personal note (and again, please feel free to decline to answer--but I think more than myself want to know the answers to these.)

Who are your personal heroes and why?

Dean Winchester, a man who will do anything for his brother. Seriously makes me cry at times.

Was your coming out as dramatic as Kyle"s or Brad"s?

Actually no. I grew up in California and the biggest coming out I had was a friend of mine saying. "I always assumed you were bisexual."

And that was it.


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments Have you slain any dragons in your life?

I know some of our readers here aspire to be authors one day.

How difficult was it to find a publisher for your work?


message 39: by John (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments You can slay as many dragons as you like, but sooner or later you will end up being eaten by one.

How difficult was it to find a publisher for your work?

I have a crippling fear of having my stuff read by people. I joined Livejournal a few years ago to try to conquer it. Along the way I met some incredible people, one of them Sue Brown who is a published author herself. She urged me to submit something to Dreamspinner and pretty much said if I did not do it I was an idiot.

She was right.

They accepted Maybe with a Chance and I've never looked back. Now the third book is coming out with a paperback edition collecting the first three novellas also, a fantasy paperback called Distant Rumblings, I just submitted a love story for the time travel anthology and I am working on a collection of short Foster stories including the next part of Boy Behind the Red Door.


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Kaje Harper | 16510 comments John wrote: "They accepted Maybe with a Chance and I've never looked back. Now the third book is coming out with a paperback edition collecting the first three novellas also, a fantasy paperback called Distant Rumblings, I just submitted a love story for the time travel anthology and I am working on a collection of short Foster stories including the next part of Boy Behind the Red Door. ..."

It is terrifying and addictive, isn't it. Took me to the age of 51 to submit anything and now...

A time travel love story sounds great - and I think having these in paperback would really widen the exposure for YA's since it opens up the school/library access, which can only be good.


message 41: by John (new) - added it

John Goode | 156 comments I agree, I had a lot of people contact me asking if Foster was in paperback because they were librarians. Kind of blew me away.


message 42: by Kaje (last edited Mar 06, 2012 03:23PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kaje Harper | 16510 comments John wrote: "I agree, I had a lot of people contact me asking if Foster was in paperback because they were librarians. Kind of blew me away."

This is a great one to have in libraries and schools (although some may not accept it for the mild but on page one episode of gay sex, I think.)

Are you planning any edits for the combined paperback to bring the three stories together or just collecting the stories under one cover?


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John Goode | 156 comments Editing the three together and making the sex much more veiled.


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John Goode | 156 comments Sammy2006 wrote: "Have you slain any dragons in your life?

I know some of our readers here aspire to be authors one day.

How difficult was it to find a publisher for your work?"



So no further questions? They just don't make stalkers like they used to. (grin)


message 45: by Kaje (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kaje Harper | 16510 comments John wrote: "So no further questions? They just don't make stalkers like they used to. (grin)
..."


OMG, you are a glutton for punishment (just kidding.)

I haven't seen the third novella yet - you are going to release that one alone before the trio together right? Is the combined version going to be in ebook too, or only print?


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John Goode | 156 comments The third book is ebook only but the collected edition will be paperback and epub.


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Kaje Harper | 16510 comments John wrote: "The third book is ebook only but the collected edition will be paperback and epub."

Great. Any release date for the third one yet?


Sammy Goode | 5380 comments John wrote: "Sammy2006 wrote: "Have you slain any dragons in your life?

I know some of our readers here aspire to be authors one day.

How difficult was it to find a publisher for your work?"


So no further q..."


Did someone just call for a stalker?? Oh dear man you have no idea how much I restrain myself!! I am a natural born gusher. Never say you were not forewarned. LOL!

Ok. I honest to god LOVED this book. So a few more questions before I go back to camping out in your shrubbery!

Do you explore the parent dynamic of both MC's in the sequels? If no why not?

We've talked a lot about heroes and themes. If there is just one thing you want teens to get from this book...one bit of wisdom....what would that be??

Now personally.....

Do you see yourself still writing in say 10 years?? In other words, do you have lots more stories screaming to get out of that brilliant mind you have?

Now mechanics....


When you write do you map out a story prior to beginning. Or just sit down and let it flow?

And this is silly how do you choose the names for your characters and do you want to use mine for some dashingly handsome character?? I know I know I'm a woman but one can always dream.

Alright stalking duty calls.


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Kaje Harper | 16510 comments Sammy2006 wrote: "And this is silly how do you choose the names for your characters and do you want to use mine for some dashingly handsome character?? I know I know I'm a woman but one can always dream."

Or maybe for the ten year old or the Labrador retriever? Just teasing - although a dog called Sammy would be a good homage and a great use of the name.


message 50: by K (new) - rated it 4 stars

K (k-polipetl) | 4090 comments Kaje wrote: "Or maybe for the ten year old or the Labrador retriever? Just teasing - although a dog called Sammy would be a good homage and a great use of the name...."

Hummm, Sammy the Labrador... can picture her as an assistance dog with either a physically disabled or possibly Autistc/aspergers teenager.... huge heart, always helpful either practically or giving emotional support....

*beats bunny away with stick whilst apologising to all concerned*


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