The Hunger Games (The Hunger Games, #1) The Hunger Games discussion


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What Makes Hunger Games a Young Adult Book?

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Tita I'm not a young adult and thoroughly enjoyed this book. Many other people my age and older love this book as well... I can't say I've read much YA in the past decade or so, which is why I can't figure out why this is a young adult book?

There are very strong political themes like oppression and war, which I feel are for a mature reader. What would make this NOT a YA book?


Nya Tomlinson-Horan-Malik-Payne-Styles i have no clue. but i read it when i was 8, and i thought it was quite interesting. maybe that's why.


message 3: by E. (new) - rated it 4 stars

E. I have no idea, but even though I am defenetly NOT a young adult I LOVED this book.


message 4: by Whitlea (last edited Mar 01, 2012 01:57PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Whitlea Replace the teenage characters with adults and give them problems and voices more characteristic of that set and you'd probably have adult fiction.

Mature themes are not foreign to YA novels. There are plenty of books in the genre (especially dystopian) that deal with heavier issues, so that doesn't disqualify it as for being Young Adult.

The big thing is the target audience for the book. It was meant to sell to teens, therefore it's classified as YA.


Tita Whitlea wrote: "Replace the teenage characters with adults and give them problems and voices more characteristic of that set and you'd probably have adult fiction.

Mature themes are not foreign to YA novels. Ther..."

Great response, thank you for elaborating...Since I loved this series so much, I think I might enjoy other YA novels.


KareB I think it targets young adults knowing that adults will read them too. I think of it the same way movies get their pg, pg-13, R ratings. By placing it in the YA genre then I know that it's a book that I can safely read and recommend to my nieces knowing that it's clean. I love YA books because I know I won't be blushing and skipping ahead because of the graphic material. I can just sit back and read. LOL :)


Elia The ages of the charaqcters themselves have a LOT to do with how a book is classified. When the protagonists are teenagers, it's a very safe bet that a book will be marketted towards an similar age group. That's not to say that other age groups will not enjoy the books, it's just a publisher's decision to market it as Young Adult because they feel they can sell the most copies to that core audience.


message 8: by JC (new) - rated it 5 stars

JC I believe it has more to do with the length of the book. YA novels are usually somewhere around 100,000 words, or 250 pages.

There is that deal with the writing as well, it is not as dense as what would be considered an "adult" book right off the back: anything by Stephen King or Tom Clancy for example, which are more dense with content.

The characters and plot are secondary to the decision, except that the 16 year old shero is a factor for a younger age group. In novels it's more about the association with the younger characters that gets youth readers more interested.

Other than that, anyone can enjoy a well-written dystopian rebellion.


Beth To be honest, the only thing that makes this YA to me is the sappy i-can't-decide-which-boy-i'm-in-love-with crap. Thats really it to me. Other than that most of the themes are much more adult in my eyes and i notice that a lot of young people i talk to about it seem to only think about the peeta vs gale thing and not the story or the themes of poverty, suppression, questioning of humanity and all that stuff. Its like the love triangle overrules all that and that depresses me a bit.


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