Comfort Reads discussion

The Fellowship of the Ring (The Lord of the Rings, #1)
This topic is about The Fellowship of the Ring
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Buddy Reads Discussions > Fellowship of the Ring -- Book Two w/ Spoilers

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

Please discuss content from Book Two, comprising Chapters XIII thru XXII. We have a few first-timers in the discussion, so PLEASE limit your discussion comments to these chapters.


Sylvia (sylviahartstra) Well Frodo has arrived in Rivendell and is safe and sound. I would love to be part of the merrymaking party after the dinner had been over. Would be nice is sit and relax and dream away.


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

Ha! I had forgotten that I split this into two books! Thanks Sylvia.

Yes, Rivendell sounds like a wonderful place to sit and dream, doesn't it?


Sylvia (sylviahartstra) I thought you did this explicitly. The copy I have has a book I and II in FotR, only book II starts with chapter 1 again, so I have to do some math to calculate the correct chapter, when I'm talking about things in book II.


message 5: by [deleted user] (new)

I did do this explicitly, and then promptly forgot about it! Kim was so far ahead, and I was so far behind, that we just discussed the book on the other thread. I'll pay attention on the next book.

I think it gets easier in the next two volumes, because the action gets to be much more separate in books I and II.


Sylvia (sylviahartstra) The fellowship has been broken up and Frodo and Sam have landed on the east bank of the Anduin to start their struggle to Mount Doom. The others are left behind in search for Frodo, after Boromir has tried to take the Ring by force from Frodo at the foot of Amon Hen.

I love the books more than the movies. There are so many differences, although I did not realize that when I watch PJ creation which gets the essence of the story, but not the beauty of Tolkien's fantasy world.


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

As far as visualizing Middle Earth, PJ got a lot of things right. The wonderful settings in the mountains in New Zealand, the beauty of the Elves, the hobbits and Hobbiton -- he really brought these things to life. But, the screen adaptation sacrificed a lot of the relationships in order to create more dramatic tension.


Sylvia (sylviahartstra) Jeannette wrote: "As far as visualizing Middle Earth, PJ got a lot of things right. The wonderful settings in the mountains in New Zealand, the beauty of the Elves, the hobbits and Hobbiton -- he really brought the..."

I agree with you, but the big problem is when visualizing a book like Tolkien's Ring is that the world he created is so much more than a movie can visualize. That's also what I have against books turned into movies. The author has written the book for the reader and his ability to visualize the plot. When a screen adaptation is made the viewer is presented with the images the producer has found fit to assemble. The viewer is more passive than the reader who has to imagine the story while reading.


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

This is true -- I read the books after seeing the movies. But, I had to create the Barrow-wights, and Tom Bombadil in my imagination. And, there are several scenes that play differently in the book, and that I like much better. So, I put the actors into Tolkien's written world, and shape them just a little bit differently at times. (For example, I never make the Ents as stupid-looking as PJ did.)


Sylvia (sylviahartstra) Jeannette wrote: "This is true -- I read the books after seeing the movies. But, I had to create the Barrow-wights, and Tom Bombadil in my imagination. And, there are several scenes that play differently in the bo..."

The Ents, wonderful creatures in Tolkien's version. Very, very, old. Full of wisdom and old lore. PJ made - as you put - stupid figures of them, unable to decide what had to be done, while in the book the Entwood takes the decision to step into the war, if I remember correctly.


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

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message 12: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks Sylvia wrote: "Jeannette wrote: "This is true -- I read the books after seeing the movies. But, I had to create the Barrow-wights, and Tom Bombadil in my imagination. And, there are several scenes that play dif..."

The slowness of the Ents and the slowness of their speech makes sense in the book, but on screen it just does not come across as well, or rather, it comes across as problematic, perhaps even silly (which you never feel when reading about the Ents).


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message 14: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks Jeannette wrote: "[spoilers removed]"

I remember.


message 15: by [deleted user] (new)

But, PJ did that in quite a few places, to heighten dramatic tension. I think the Ents are pretty amazing, and the Huorns, too.


message 16: by Manybooks (new)

Manybooks Jeannette wrote: "But, PJ did that in quite a few places, to heighten dramatic tension. I think the Ents are pretty amazing, and the Huorns, too."

I am just glad he included the ents and did not simply leave them out (or have them mentioned behind the scenes). On the other hand, unlike Tom Bombadill, one could not really remove the ents from the story, as they are such an integral part of it.


Sylvia (sylviahartstra) Gundula wrote: "Jeannette wrote: "But, PJ did that in quite a few places, to heighten dramatic tension. I think the Ents are pretty amazing, and the Huorns, too."

I am just glad he included the ents and did not ..."


I like the special effects and animated figures PJ used to heighten the story. Look at Gollum, nasty and cruel, but this personae is well chosen; those long limbs the bold, wobbly head with those big eyes and the skinny torso.
In that way he also created the Ents, but he missed the mystery around those living beings of old.


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