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Episode Discussions > Episode 22: Fairy Tales

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message 1: by [deleted user] (new)

What an interesting episode, I really enjoyed this one, and not just because I'm half way through The Snow Child and completely enthralled. Great interview!

The subject of fairy tales, folk stories and mythologies incorporated or influencing literary fiction is a huge subject, so I thought maybe worth continuing a bit. Through writing and reading I came to the belief a long time ago that it's impossible to truly create a real person through text, that every character, even in non-fiction, is in some ways a mythological creature. In Trickster Makes This World Hyde had something to say to anyone who thought of themselves a trickster much like Raven or Coyote in North American Native mythology, a character that is sometimes villain sometimes hero, always disobedient, but always showing a truth or a lesson: no person is a trickster, the character represents a part of humanity as a whole. I think even real people reported on in non-fiction, although real to the author who knows the person, can only really be seen as a trickster type representation to a reader.


Elizabeth☮ i haven't finished listening to this episode, but i do enjoy native american mythology. it is so rich with symbolism and imagery.

i'll post more once i listen to the whole episode.


Simon (savidgereads) | 449 comments Mod
Interesting thoughts Andrew. I think a trickster if described as "a character that is sometimes villain sometimes hero, always disobedient, but always showing a truth or a lesson" sounds like my sort of ideal narrator to be honest.

It would be interesting to see more about people's local myths and legends if anyone has any? The Grimms ones are gret but I do think we miss out on many more.


message 4: by [deleted user] (new)

Well I just read in a Guardian Books article that 500 new fairytales have been discovered in an archive in Regensburg, Germany, after being locked away for 150 years! From the article: "For example, there is the tale of a maiden who escapes a witch by transforming herself into a pond. The witch then lies on her stomach and drinks all the water, swallowing the young girl, who uses a knife to cut her way out of the witch."


Simon (savidgereads) | 449 comments Mod
Where's the link to that Andrew that sounds like a brilliant piece!


Tracy Thank you for another great episode! You guys are the best! I'm heading to Alaska in a few weeks and I hope to stop by the bookstore where Eowyn Ivey works ~maybe I will get to tell her in person how much I loved her book!


message 7: by [deleted user] (new)

Ah yes! here`s the link: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/...


Kats (kats1) | 42 comments Amongst his favourite fairy tales, didn't Ali Shaw mention a chinese one where a girl creates something with her paintbrush and everything she paints leaps off the page and comes to life?

Well, guess what I just found on amazon when I was browsing my outdated shopping basket:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Magic-Paintbr...

Sounds just like that, doesn't it, and adapted by Julia Donaldson, no less!


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Kats wrote: "Amongst his favourite fairy tales, didn't Ali Shaw mention a chinese one where a girl creates something with her paintbrush and everything she paints leaps off the page and comes to life?

Well, g..."


Amazing! I curious to know how many other books, and maybe books I've read, are inspired by fairy tales now.


Simon (savidgereads) | 449 comments Mod
Andrew - thank you for the link. I shall pop and have a gander at that.

Kat, I will forward that link to Ali and see if he has read it. Thanks for finding it.


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