2022 Reading Challenge discussion

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ARCHIVE 2012 > Book 1: End of Book Discussion *contains spoilers*

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message 1: by Tatum (new)

Tatum | 459 comments Answer any/all of these questions or pose some of your own.

1. Before the Games start, Peeta tells Katniss, “. . . I want to die as myself . . . I don’t want them to change me in there. Turn me into some kind of monster that I’m not.” What does this tell you about Peeta? What does he fear more than death? Is he able to stay true to himself during the Games? Was Katniss? Why?

2. Do you think the fact that the tributes know they are always on camera and know that the Gamemakers influence the environment change how they play the game or how they act? How?

3. How do the Hunger Games compare to our Reality TV shows?

4. Is this book really ultimately about a class struggle? About the power of the have's over the have nots?

5. How do you think Katniss feels about the Capitol? Peeta? Haymitch? Cinna? Effie?

6. What for you was the most pivotal scene in the book?


message 2: by Melissa (new)

Melissa (missie322) | 208 comments 2. haha .. I had actually compared it to "Survivor on Steroids" on another thread.


message 3: by Tatum (new)

Tatum | 459 comments Melissa wrote: "2. haha .. I had actually compared it to "Survivor on Steroids" on another thread."

Survivor on Steroids... it is rather like that isn't it?


message 4: by Alia (last edited Mar 07, 2012 07:14AM) (new)

Alia (alia22) | 31 comments Its been ages since I finished a book so fast , I couldnt keep my hands off or even have a good sleep ! I finished it in 2 days which is the fastest I have been since I entered the stupid uni . this book went straight to my all-time favorite list . Is it a bit stupid to say that my heart still aches for the kids that had died for the mere amusement of the Capitol ? I felt extreme sympathy for Caro even ! After putting it down , I realized that we are actually are living and playing The Hunger Games everyday ! look around the world .. people are dying every second because of the greed and love of power from either own their leaders or other countries . The novel portrays our world now with the only difference that everyone is a part of it -no matter if your name is drawn or not - and their is no winner at the end. We all lose.


message 5: by Alia (new)

Alia (alia22) | 31 comments Sara wrote: "Aly22 wrote: "Its been ages since I finished a book so fast , I couldnt keep my hands off or even have a good sleep ! I finished it in 2 days which is the fastest I have been since I entered the st..."

i meant a metaphorical list :P , i can NEVER have a top favorite , every book touch me in a different way , sometimes i feel they are like my babies !! (creepy , i know)
if i may ask , what are your top five ? im always on the hunt for new books to read :)


message 6: by Alia (new)

Alia (alia22) | 31 comments Sara wrote: "Aly22 wrote: "Sara wrote: "Aly22 wrote: "Its been ages since I finished a book so fast , I couldnt keep my hands off or even have a good sleep ! I finished it in 2 days which is the fastest I have ..."

thanks ! They sound really interesting.
I will definitely try to have my hand on them soon :)


message 7: by Tatum (last edited Mar 07, 2012 10:01AM) (new)

Tatum | 459 comments I can't actually pick a top 5 either, I have trouble to pick top 5 authors.

I agree though Aly that there's a much larger message in the book, that she has made things purposely brutal and over the top to showcase what she is trying to say. Interestingly, since the book is actually aimed at young adults originally, she may also have been trying to say that you may have to play the game at times, but you can still be yourself and break out of it as well.


message 8: by Kara, TBR Twins (new)

Kara (karaayako) | 3971 comments It's violent, but I think it's fine for younger kids because the main character still reacts to the violence--she isn't immune to it. The violence means something and affects her. (If it were told from the point of view of one of the careers, I might feel differently about its appropriateness.)

I think it's wonderful that kids are getting used to dystopian literature at an early age. This book is exciting, so it'll keep them interested, and it raises questions that are great to start thinking about.

For some kids, Hunger Games will be the gateway book to "harder" dystopian literature. And other kids (particularly the ones who read this and came away with only "omg, I <3 Gale/Peeta") will never read anything like this again, but at least they got it once.


message 9: by Alia (new)

Alia (alia22) | 31 comments Tatum wrote: "I can't actually pick a top 5 either, I have trouble to pick top 5 authors.

I agree though Aly that there's a much larger message in the book, that she has made things purposely brutal and over th..."


I think she aimed the book for young adults to grow this idea in them especially those exact people will may be leaders or with power some day. What I find is impressive , is that she is trying to convey this message in the most way they can relate to. That's really smart from her and i thing to admire really.


message 10: by Lorelei (new)

Lorelei (goodreadscomlorelei_reads) | 393 comments I also think that Collins has a message in this book. It is hard to say how this will play out without reading the rest of the books but it does give us a view into how the evil the world could get if we let it. The people were made to acquire that District's resources for no benefit to themselves, everyone's ability to earn was equal and they were unable to trust anyone else. Much food for thought.


message 11: by Beverly (new)

Beverly (bshrib) Aly22 wrote: "Its been ages since I finished a book so fast , I couldnt keep my hands off or even have a good sleep ! I finished it in 2 days which is the fastest I have been since I entered the stupid uni . thi..."

I think in a way our world is very much like the world that Collins created. The gap between the elite and the poor is continuously growing in our society, just like the huge gap between the Capitol and the Districts. Also, there are countries like Sudan that are using hunger to kill their own people. We really are not so far off from the world of The Hunger Games.


message 12: by Johanna (new)

Johanna | 766 comments I would definitely have to think about giving this book to someone young. Especially after finishing the series this was my thought. But I will write about that when we get the topics for the two other books!


message 13: by Ronie (new)

Ronie Washington-mercado (roniegurl) | 23 comments I gave the whole trilogy to my BFF's daughter and she is 12 and she is loving them. I was worried about the violence level but she seems to be fine with it.


message 14: by Nikki (last edited Apr 06, 2012 07:20AM) (new)

Nikki Did anyone hear the news hype about the actress that played Katniss was too "chuncky" to play that roll? They said that the charactor came from a food famished district and the actress should have portrayed that.... I thought that I read that she was a little better fit because she hunted and was able to feed her family with the game that she caught.

Does anyone else see an issue with the medias statment??


message 15: by Ashley (new)

Ashley Nikki wrote: "Did anyone hear the news hype about the actress that played Katniss was too "chuncky" to play that roll? They said that the charactor came from a food famished district and the actress should have ..."

I laugh at anything the media says. None of them probably reads the books to know she hunted deer, birds, rabbits,etc. that would make her and her family better off than others in her district. She hunted and then sold what she didn't need for extra money as well,I believe, to by the food she couldn't hunt for in the woods.


message 16: by Connieb (new)

Connieb (otherwordly) | 82 comments Nikki wrote: "Did anyone hear the news hype about the actress that played Katniss was too "chuncky" to play that roll? They said that the charactor came from a food famished district and the actress should have ..."
It's awfully difficult to appear to be malnourished without actually being malnourished. I would think it would be quite dangerous for an actor to try to physically accomodate that expectation! It seems like the public may be more aware of and reasonable about these kinds of things in movies, kudos to someone for having some common sense.


message 17: by Johanna (new)

Johanna | 766 comments That was pretty bad, I remember seeing a bit of the movie, or maybe the whole thing I can´t remember anymore. I do think no one should be made to do that.


message 18: by Nikki (new)

Nikki My thought is; way to go media for adding one more thing to a young girls self image issues.


message 19: by Ashley (new)

Ashley I hate listening to the media anymore. I wouldn't even want it as a job. It is depressing and not very trustworthy or informative (more like a live soap opera with arguments over celebrities, politics, and other stupid things).

I thought Katniss was absolutely amazing! She was the star of the movie in my opinion (along with Rue).

Speaking of which...some of the people in certain organizations are mad that District 11 (Rue's district) were Black. Since it was the agricultural district, they are saying it continues to promote slavery.

My argument to that....Slavery was abolished in 1865. It is time to move on. I think they did very good choosing Rue for the role along with the others in her district.


message 20: by Kara, TBR Twins (new)

Kara (karaayako) | 3971 comments Did you see the other thing about Rue being black? There were quotations from Twitter by people upset that Rue was played by a black girl (because they clearly missed the notes in the book that said she and Thresh were both darker-skinned). One person even said that it made her death less sad. I was AGHAST.


message 21: by Nikki (last edited Apr 06, 2012 10:48AM) (new)

Nikki I don't think that they even addressed race in the book did they??

eta: apparently we were posting at the same time...


message 22: by Nikki (new)

Nikki How can anyone think that the color of a person's skin will determine how sad you are about their death? She was 12 people.....


message 23: by Kara, TBR Twins (new)

Kara (karaayako) | 3971 comments If I recall correctly, the book references skin tone only and not race.


message 24: by Nikki (new)

Nikki I guess I was so into the plot that I didn't even notice the reference. (or it didn't matter to me)


message 25: by Nikki (new)

Nikki Nikki wrote: "How can anyone think that the color of a person's skin will determine how sad you are about their death? She was 12 people....."

and for that matter, anyone hunting another human is wrong....


message 26: by Ashley (new)

Ashley Kara wrote: "If I recall correctly, the book references skin tone only and not race."

You are correct, Kara. I only remember skin-tone.

Nikki, I cried when I read her death in the book and I cried at the movie theatre when she died. Her skin color did not change the fact that she died and it was very sad.

It is sad that racism is still so prevalent in our world today. :(


message 27: by Nikki (new)

Nikki The book did a much better job defining their friendship. They spent more time together in the book than I think they displayed in the movie.

I def cried when I read it, but I think because I knew it was coming in the movie, I didn't cry while watching it.


message 28: by Ashley (new)

Ashley Nikki wrote: "The book did a much better job defining their friendship. They spent more time together in the book than I think they displayed in the movie.

I def cried when I read it, but I think because I k..."


That is why the book is usually always better than the movie. You get more details. The movie is usually always for the entertainment factor.

Living through the characters in the book is always best. :)


message 29: by Nikki (new)

Nikki I agree it is like you are right there with them. Like you are a charactor in the book playing out all the scenes.


message 30: by Johanna (new)

Johanna | 766 comments The Rue scene was really sad in both for me, but I think I only felt teary watching the movie because I had read the book before.


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