Vaginal Fantasy Book Club discussion

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2012 Archives > Feb 2012: Is this intended for adults??

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message 1: by Lepton (new)

Lepton | 20 comments Lady Julia's journey through Silent in the Grave is annoyingly didactic. Despite the character for all intents and purposes being a mature but perhaps slightly innocent woman, a good deal of the development for her character appears akin to "well-intentioned" but oddly anti-feminist instruction to a young woman.

To my mind, much is made of characters that are her elder instructing Lady Julia on how to act, how to dress, and much of what her values are meant to be consistent, of course, with her desirability to men.

I would also argue for much of the novel Lady Julia is occupied with a kind of adolescent angst and self-doubt exemplarized by her constant self-recriminations. Similarly, the character shows what I would suggest is a glaring lack of self-knowledge and self-awareness that is emblematic of teenage women.

Given the lack of "adult" content and this odd and annoying Young Adult angle, I would suggest this book seems targeted at younger and perhaps pseudo-literary minded women.


message 2: by Necrophidian (last edited Feb 28, 2012 08:02PM) (new)

Necrophidian | 74 comments "I would also argue for much of the novel Lady Julia is occupied with a kind of adolescent angst and self-doubt exemplarized by her constant self-recriminations."

Constant self-recrimination isn't strictly an adolescent thing.

"Similarly, the character shows what I would suggest is a glaring lack of self-knowledge and self-awareness that is emblematic of teenage women."

While that may be considered "emblematic of teenage women", it's certainly not limited to them, right?

Your assessment of the character is, I think, not far off the mark. But the critical factor I'd say you're overlooking is that, once married, Julia went into stasis... sorta like a developmental holding pattern.

I don't know about you, but I've run into more than a few folks like this in my days. People who, for one reason or another, just stopped moving forward emotionally. In fact, I'd say it's pretty common.

As I saw it, Edward's death clicked off Julia's pause button. The realizations and gradual self-acceptance that followed were ultimately what kept me engaged in the read. 'Cuz the relationship with Brisbane certainly wasn't doin' the trick. I wanted to kick him in the funbits. >.>


message 3: by Michele (new)

Michele (nerdmichele) | 74 comments To take DJ's response one step further, let's look at the book through a Victorian lens:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Separate...

See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cult_of_...


message 4: by Jane (new)

Jane Higginson | 180 comments yeah I think from reading micheles post and the wiki articles your looking at the book with too much of a modern eye lepton, look up what victorian england was like at that time then think about Lady Julias character


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