Fans of Maps discussion

Maphead: Charting the Wide, Weird World of Geography Wonks
This topic is about Maphead
25 views
Group Challenges & Group Reads > April 2012 Group Read!

Comments Showing 1-31 of 31 (31 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
The results of the poll are clear - we're going to be reading and discussing Maphead: Charting the Wide, Weird World of Geography Wonks by Ken Jennings in April!

Try not to wait until April to get your copy of the book - I will open the discussion thread on April 1st and I will permit spoilers!

(Spoilers in non-fiction? Maybe!)


message 2: by Natalie (new) - added it

Natalie (nkmeyers) | 18 comments Mod
Got my Mapheadtoday!


Jeff (Jefforama) | 5 comments If you're on the fence about reading this, as I was, I'm 80 pages in after one day of reading and am really enjoying it. Jennings is a really pleasant tour guide, and he's, at times, really funny. My wife is getting annoyed because as I read, I keep interrupting whatever she's doing with "hey, did you know ..."


Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
Good to know, thanks for sharing!


Paul | 147 comments If there was an Ardmore LA it would be farther from Ardmore AL than a hundred feet. Tennessee, Louisiana they all look about the same. I will say having lived in both the moonshine is better in Tennessee but the turtle sauce piquante is better in Louisiana. I would say that if you are visiting Ardmore AL or TN it is only a short trip to the Coondog Cemetery in Tuscumbia AL. If you prefer bird dogs there is the Bird Dog Hall of Fame in Grand Junction TN. I remember seeing the signs on US 72 while driving west.

prt


Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
I'm so excited to read this, but it still hasn't been returned by the other patron who is reading it and so my request isn't being fulfilled. :(


message 7: by Betsy (last edited Apr 09, 2012 12:24PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Betsy | 152 comments I'm about 1/4 through it and really enjoying it (it's like he's writing about me), but I'm having trouble finding the time to read at all.


Theresa | 1 comments Paul wrote: "If there was an Ardmore LA it would be farther from Ardmore AL than a hundred feet. Tennessee, Louisiana they all look about the same. I will say having lived in both the moonshine is better in Ten..." Good point. I'm sure he meant Ardmore TN. But yeah, Louisiana and Alabama don't border each other, so the statement from the book makes no sense. Totally missed that when I was reading this.


Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
Ralph and I are *still* waiting for this to come in to the library. (Another patron is hoarding it.)


Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
Ralph's almost 1/2 done, then I'll read it. :)


Betsy | 152 comments I really enjoyed this book. It was an easy read, but with lots of information. Sometimes it seemed a little like a school research paper with the footnotes and historical references, but it was more relaxed than that. Rather like a conversation with a particularly knowledgeable friend. Of course, I'm a maphead.


Ralph McEwen | 46 comments OK, I just finished and here is my review.
I really liked this book. Ken Jennings has written this book like he is just sitting next to you and telling this most incredible story about maps, the people who love them and how they affect everyday life past, present and future. He also opens doors into himself that reflect many of the fears and thoughts in the other map lovers. The book show that there many ways that people use, love and even obsess about maps.
Even though I think Mr. Jennings has been abundantly blessed to the point of his cup over-flowing; good looks, extremely bright, renown for more then just winning Jeopardy!, healthy wife and children … the list goes on and on, I still like him and his sense of style. At least that's what I get from reading his book and seeing him on TV. How dare him to be this talented on top of everything else and just to top it off he even likes geocaching, one of my hobbies. I want to hate him but the bastard is just so damn likable. Oops, see he can't even be call a bastard, loving parents and all that...sum bitch.


message 15: by Darlene (new) - added it

Darlene (dar49) | 16 comments Like


message 16: by Darlene (new) - added it

Darlene (dar49) | 16 comments After the review you gave us yesterday I put a copy on hold at our library. I know I tried before but couldn't find it. Oh, how I miss a physical card catalog!


message 17: by Cheryl is busier irl atm. (last edited May 03, 2012 03:15PM) (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
Finally I'm making progess in it. It's short & 'breezy' but not exactly what I hoped, what I expected after enjoying Brainiac: Adventures In The Curious, Competitive, Compulsive World Of Trivia Buffs. There are so many pop culture references, and naughty jokes, and wise-acre vulgarisms, that I'm almost nauseated. No doubt most readers love it, but it's not for me. I want more substance, less style. I guess his editor reminded him how popular Bill Bryson and his sense of humor is?

(I too miss physical card catalogs, Darlene - judging by *why* some folks in the book are Mapheads, it's probably not surprising.)


Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
I do like that Jennings used footnotes for the big asides, and also had end notes for bibliographical credits. It's easier to read this way than a book that has either but not both kinds of notes, which is what is more common in the non-fiction that I read.


message 19: by Darlene (new) - added it

Darlene (dar49) | 16 comments Hey, I finally got my copy from the library. I know you are all going on to another book. Will this board still be open when I finally get around to finishing this book?


message 20: by Cheryl is busier irl atm. (last edited May 04, 2012 09:33AM) (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
It certainly will! (And no, we don't have another book in the queue.)

You might not want to read the next post though, as I'm going to share stuff I liked, in a sort of spoilery manner, so to speak.


Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
Turns out some of my book dart markers were for things I wanted to research further, such as Weirton, WV.

My next book dart was at the point where he explored the question (I paraphrase) 'what if the governing metaphor for our culture wasn't about quests and maps? What if it were more holistic, like a library, or a cookbook?' He and I agree that we're probably evolutionarily wired to find our home and follow paths, but it's interesting to think that we could possibly see the world differently. Maybe SF authors could create an ET with this different worldview.


message 22: by Cheryl is busier irl atm. (last edited May 04, 2012 10:10AM) (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
I loved that Ken shared that he hacked the Jennings GPS to say, instead of that annoying 'recalculating,' "You turned the wrong way, dumb-ass. Just do what I say." And they named it Daniel. And "as were were walking through a science museum exhibit about GPS, Dylan said wistfully, 'I wish Daniel was here. He'd love this.'"

Our GPS has been assigned a personality, but not to this extent.

Of course, since I geocache, I was excited about the chapter that talks about us. I think Jennings did a great job talking about how different people appreciate the activity, what we all get out of it depending on our personal make-up. One thing that was knew to me that I really like is YAPIDKA, Yet Another Park I Didn't Know About.

That's the main appeal of geocaching to me. I'm not hugely excited about filling the calender or racking up the numbers, I'm more interested in filling up the map and finding the clever and cute cache containers, but I'm mostly excited about getting off the freeways and into the parks & neighborhoods &, yes, historical markers.

Btw, since 2010 some national parklands permit caches, subject to approval by the park superintendent. This is new policy - and apparently we earned it because of our goal of CITO. So, please do practice Cache In Trash Out!

Btw, I should have no problem getting "Mingo," the oldest still active cache in the world, when I visit my eldest son in Kansas City this summer.


message 23: by Cheryl is busier irl atm. (last edited May 04, 2012 10:53AM) (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
I like how Jennings found so many different ways to enjoy maps. Did any of you look to see if you can get to any Integer Degree Confluenes in your area? None of Nevada's are convenient, but some of them might be accessible if Ralph and I decide to attack them. http://confluence.org/region.php?id=28

ETA - further research reveals, from the thumbnail photos of each area, that there aren't many that are easy or urban. I still think it'd be fun to track some of them down.


message 24: by Jeff (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jeff (Jefforama) | 5 comments Naughty jokes? Vulagarisms? I'm trying to figure out if I'm an inattentive reader or just crass. Could you give an example or two? I found the author's humor to be totally benign, but it's possible I missed something, or am just not remembering it.

Separately, did the book inspire anybody to find their nearest longitude / latitude integer intersection? I've been meaning to, but haven't yet.


message 25: by Cheryl is busier irl atm. (last edited May 04, 2012 12:59PM) (new)

Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
penis gourds

"It's hard ot imagine an easier [question]...than the city where all the students live, unless you add two more items -- "Your Ass" and "A Hole in the Ground"."

A full long paragraph about Dildo, Newfoundland.

Vespucci got the continents of America named after him because he was more of a showman, presenting "Carribean women are all hawt! And, like, total sluts!"

I'm not saying the book is x-rated. I am saying it's got lots of cool stuff in it that many of the kids who compete in the National Geographic Bee won't get to read for a few years because their parents are (in my opinion, correctly) sheltering them from that crude kind of stuff until they're teenagers.

Separately, my message right above yours is about the long/lat integers - click on the link; it's easy. :)


message 26: by Paul (new) - rated it 5 stars

Paul | 147 comments 31°N 95°W is near my house and not far from where the Bearing Fire started last year.
http://lufkindailynews.com/news/local...

prt


Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
That is an interesting article. And the photos bring home what Jennings was pointing out in the book, that the aerial views we have now really give us a different sense of spatial analysis than the old days when folks were limited to ground level surveys.

I wonder how many people are especially interested in logging that confluence now, since it's actually got 'landmark' interest.

What a nightmare of a fire.


message 28: by Paul (new) - rated it 5 stars

Paul | 147 comments The land to the north and south appear to be pine plantations from the Google Maps imagery which is two or more years old. One of the images showed a deer stand just to the west when they visited.

The fire was about five miles away when they stopped it. I found burnt pine bark in the yard the next morning when I got home from work.
There was a log truck every minute for the next thirty days then they slowed down to every five to ten minutes.


prt


Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
Wow.


message 30: by Jeff (last edited May 04, 2012 07:57PM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Jeff (Jefforama) | 5 comments Ha! You had me convinced at "penis gourds." I guess that just didnt overcome my baseline crass-ness.


Cheryl is busier irl atm. (cherylllr) | 644 comments Mod
< chuckle >


back to top