As long as Its Irish! discussion

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Historical or Contemporary?

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message 1: by Whitney (new)

Whitney K.E. (whitneyk-e) | 10 comments Mod
What do you prefer? Historical Irish romances? Or Contemporary?


message 2: by Cheryl (new)

Cheryl (cawils_99) I enjoy historical romance by far. I can really fantasize about knights and lords. Not that I don't enjoy a good contemporary now and then.


message 3: by Whitney (new)

Whitney K.E. (whitneyk-e) | 10 comments Mod
I love historicals, but if I'm to put my feet in a characters shoes its gotta be contemporary. Besides, theres always that insane feeling you'll meet an irishman as handsome as let's say... Jerry from P.s. I love you haha.


message 4: by Lyn (last edited Mar 22, 2012 10:12AM) (new)

Lyn Horner | 1 comments Hello, just joined the group. Since I write historicals, that's obviously what I prefer. My Texas Druids series are western romances featuring a trio of gifted siblings, descendents of legendary Irish Druids. The first two books are available on Amazon.Book three is in the works. I've also published a novella which serves as a prequel to the series. This little book, titled White Witch, takes two of my characters through the horrific Chicago Fire of 1871 and introduces their psychic abilities.

Darlin' Druid, the first book in my trilogy is the 2nd place winner in the Paranormal Romance Guild's 2011 Reviewers choice Award.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ASNDES

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Om4QX4...


message 5: by Whitney (new)

Whitney K.E. (whitneyk-e) | 10 comments Mod
Thanks for sharing Lyn. :)


message 6: by Chris (new)

Chris Almeida (chrisalmeida) | 2 comments Both. Ireland is magical no matter the time. :)


message 7: by Whitney (new)

Whitney K.E. (whitneyk-e) | 10 comments Mod
Chris wrote: "Both. Ireland is magical no matter the time. :)"

Too right, Chris


message 8: by Peter (new)

Peter Murphy (peter_murphy) | 7 comments All of Irish History is romantic! It's the contemporary reality that sucks!
Check out: Lagan Love
Peter.


message 9: by Whitney (new)

Whitney K.E. (whitneyk-e) | 10 comments Mod
I'm hurt, Peter haha.
I write contemporary Irish romances. I love them and Historicals. :)
W


message 10: by JoAnn (new)

JoAnn Ross (joannross) | 9 comments Peter wrote: "All of Irish History is romantic! It's the contemporary reality that sucks!
Check out: Lagan Love
Peter."


And wouldn't the 1980s be contemporary times? You've a wry Irish wit, Peter, lad. ;) It's good to see you here. Two of my Irish books use song titles for every chapter header, but I somehow missed using "Lagan Love."


message 11: by Peter (new)

Peter Murphy (peter_murphy) | 7 comments JoAnn wrote: "Peter wrote: "All of Irish History is romantic! It's the contemporary reality that sucks!
Check out: Lagan Love
Peter."

And wouldn't the 1980s be contemporary times? You've a wry Irish wit, Peter..."


JoAnn,
The 1980s are ancient history, by now!
Good to hear from you again and I hope the writing is going well.
Peter


message 12: by JoAnn (new)

JoAnn Ross (joannross) | 9 comments Peter wrote: The 1980s are ancient history, by now."

Then I guess I'm writing Medieval, or maybe Stone Age (lol) since I'm working, in my free time, on a longer Irish novel set a bit earlier than your Lagan Love, in the mid '60s to '70s.

Meanwhile, I'm playing in the present, which allows for some interesting storylines, given the Celtic Tiger rollercoaster. The small Clare coastal town my readers have enjoyed visiting in previous books has undergone some changes, but, like Brigadoon (which I realize is the wrong country!), it will, of course, rise again. ;)


message 13: by Peter (new)

Peter Murphy (peter_murphy) | 7 comments "a longer Irish novel set in the mid '60s to '70s?"
Do tell a bit more.


message 14: by JoAnn (new)

JoAnn Ross (joannross) | 9 comments Peter wrote: ""a longer Irish novel set in the mid '60s to '70s?"
Do tell a bit more."


I would, but the only person who ever knows what I'm writing, including my agents and editors, until I'm finished, is my husband. It's not that I'm paranoid; it's just that when I talk about stories, the magic drains out of them. Does that make sense? It does move from Clare to Dublin and back and forth and includes John XXIII and the laundries.

I grew up on longer books; the last of my Irish ones was 135,000 words before Simon & Schuster gave me the choice of cutting 25,000 words or raising the price, to what thought was high, so I killed a character before the book opened, which cut her scenes. (people just talked about her.) One thing about the possibility of self publishing is I wouldn't have to worry about a longer word count.

I did, btw, really enjoy your Lagan Love and must, as soon as I have time, add it to my book list. Having spent much time in Dublin & Toronto beginning in the '80s, I felt as if I was right there with your characters. I could also so hear the Canadian mother suggesting her daughter go to "foreign" Montreal rather than Dublin.


message 15: by Peter (new)

Peter Murphy (peter_murphy) | 7 comments JoAnn wrote: "Peter wrote: ""a longer Irish novel set in the mid '60s to '70s?"
Do tell a bit more."

I would, but the only person who ever knows what I'm writing, including my agents and editors, until I'm fini..."


Enough said. The story sounds like a great read with John & the laundries. I love when the dark shadows of the past are woven into stories - but you probably guessed that by now.
And I know what you mean about 'cutting.' Lagan Love got 'cut' by half. In some ways it was better but some things that were dear got left on the floor.
My next one sprawled across 50 years (60s to now) and had to become a trilogy. Thankfully, it has been 'picked-up' even as I work through the second. It, too, uses the times as backdrop.
Do let me know when the 'new' one is out.


message 16: by JoAnn (new)

JoAnn Ross (joannross) | 9 comments Ooh, we're partly playing in the same time period! There's so much to mine during those times. I love that you're doing fifty years. I grew up reading generational sagas and keep thinking that they might someday make a comeback, but I suspect readers' attention spans are much shorter these days. Even I have to watch that I'm not suddenly -- OMG! -- writing twitterspeak into my book.

I will let you know. I've been debating all week whether someone will live or die. Ah, the power. . .


message 17: by Peter (new)

Peter Murphy (peter_murphy) | 7 comments JoAnn wrote: "Ooh, we're partly playing in the same time period! There's so much to mine during those times. I love that you're doing fifty years. I grew up reading generational sagas and keep thinking that the..."

I'm sure this will help!

“Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement.”
― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring


message 18: by JoAnn (new)

JoAnn Ross (joannross) | 9 comments Great quote! Thanks! Killing people was easier when I was writing suspense!


message 19: by Jay (new)

Jay (btsandfaith) | 1 comments I'm so happy this is a group! I'm rather young, I'll admit, but just finished two of the 'Irish Trilogy' by Nora Roberts. I can honestly say I have a severe longing to go to Ireland and find myself a gorgeous man. I think what really got to me was the faeries and ghost tales. I want to read another series or book with that feel to is. Magical, but romantic and also grown up


message 20: by Cornelia (new)

Cornelia | 2 comments I definitely enjoy historicals more than contemporary romance or fiction. Of course, I'm crazy about Morgan LLywellwen's books.


message 21: by Bekka (new)

Bekka | 4 comments Is there a list somewhere of Irish reading material? If so, where?
Thanks!


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