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Some, ambiguous expressions in James Sallis' 'Drive'
Spidersens Spidersens (last edited Feb 22, 2012 08:00PM ) Feb 22, 2012 05:44PM
I've been reading this for weeks. Chapter 13 now. Not a native speaker, Korean, I found some ambiguous expressions. They are...

- "Cattle calls, you're saying." in Chp. 11

What would the full sentence of this be? I know what cattle call is, though.

- "Welcome to the promised land." "Locusts and all." in Chp. 11

What are locusts in this context? An animal? A tree? An oil pump as an "iron locust"? Or a metaphor from the novel/movie "The Day of the Locust"?

- Change yourself, you change the world? in Chp. 11

What would the full sentence of this be? Why did Driver think like this?

- Barge on the river. African Queen. in Chp. 11

Where did African Queen come from? Did the barge remind the movie, or what?

- "You’ve had the pork and yucca, right?" "Only about twenty times. Nice vest! New?" "Everyone’s a comic." in Chp. 13

These don't look like they are a part of a single dialogue. Are these, say, captured, from the crowd in Gustavo's?

Thanks... from Suwon, South Korea.



Trekscribbler (last edited Feb 27, 2012 03:25AM ) Feb 27, 2012 03:23AM   1 vote
- "Welcome to the promised land." "Locusts and all." in Chp. 11

MEANING: The 'promised land' is a phrase that has Biblical overtones, meaning that you've arrived in a land blessed by God. However, as in the Bible, some of the 'promised lands' are overrun by locusts (insects) in a plague that hints that civilization is coming to an end.

- Barge on the river. African Queen. in Chp. 11

MEANING: I believe this is only a reference to the film, THE AFRICAN QUEEN, in that a barge is a slow-moving boat.

- "Cattle calls, you're saying." in Chp. 11

TRANSLATION: "Do you mean 'cattle calls'?"

- Change yourself, you change the world? in Chp. 11

TRANSLATION: "If you change yourself, then you change the world." MEANING: It's basically just a 'saying' or an 'adage' -- if you change yourself, then you see the world that you live in differently. You can't 'change' the world, so you have to 'change' yourself, and THAT changes the world for you.

- "You’ve had the pork and yucca, right?" "Only about twenty times. Nice vest! New?" "Everyone’s a comic." in Chp. 13

Sorry, but I can't help you with this one. If they don't look like a part of dialogue, then you're probably right ... that these are things just said in a crowd, and they're put in so that you can kind of get the vocal flavor of the crowd.

I hope this helps!

By the way, I love Korean movies. I just saw WAR OF THE ARROWS and loved it. If you can recommend any really GREAT Korean films, lemme know!

5544401
Dharmakirti I am a fan of Korean film and some of my favorites are:
Chi-hwa-sean (Painted Fire)
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring
Oasis
Poetry
Vengence Trilog
...more
Mar 01, 2012 07:22AM · flag
4544441
Trekscribbler Dharmakirti wrote: "I am a fan of Korean film and some of my favorites are:
Chi-hwa-sean (Painted Fire)
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...and Spring
Oasis
P
...more
Mar 01, 2012 07:55AM · flag

Nofish (last edited Feb 02, 2018 05:56AM ) Feb 02, 2018 05:45AM   0 votes
This is really old, but I typed the answer anyway, so here goes nothing:

Not a native either - and I haven't read Chapter 13 yet, however, I think the character replying "everybody's a comic" is Manny, who is said to only wear the same old and worn down clothes early in the book, despite being rich, to which Manny replies by pointing out the joke's so lame and trite, that only amateurs will use it, and keep thinking, or insist, it's funny.

"Everybody's a comic" is at the same time deflecting criticism (since Manny isn't destitute, there is no material obstacle keeping him from dressing well or at least decently, IF he wanted), and a retort ("you think you're funny, take a hike huh")

About twenty times. Driver(?) asks the interlocutor if he's had a certain dish, which is implied to be out-of-this-world goodness, and the other character acknowledges its out-of-worldliness, by replying he could eat it (has eaten eat it) twenty times in a row (=hyperbole).

Hope this helps.


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