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Authors > Favorite Stephen King story and why?

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message 1: by Troy (new)

Troy Mccombs | 41 comments I made a topic on your favorite Lovecraft story and why; now the topic is fav King story and why. It can be fav movie or story. I haven't read lots of his work solely because I'd watched the movies already and spoiled it for myself.

My fav King movies:
Stand by Me
The Stand
Shawshank Redemtion
The Green Mile
It

My fav King stories, or books:
Carrie
The Stand
The End of the Whole Mess
(and others in Nightmares and Dreamscapes I don't remember the names of).


message 2: by John (last edited Feb 20, 2012 04:36AM) (new)

John Moretz (vladdytrout) The Shining and Christine because they were two of the few books that actually frightened me when I first read them.


message 3: by Peter (last edited Feb 20, 2012 04:59AM) (new)

Peter Meredith (goodreadscompetermeredith) | 25 comments The Stand because I fell in love with the characters and never wanted the book to end.
The book that as the years have gone on I have more of a problem with: Salem's lot.
His version of Vampires(you know, actual blood-sucking horrible fiends) has ruined me for all others including the intellectual thoughtful vamps(Rice-you bored me after book 3) and sparkly vamps(Meyer-oh please!)


message 4: by Timothy (new)

Timothy Asbury | 960 comments The Dead Zone will always be my favorite because it's a great story and the first Stephen King book I read way back in High School.


message 5: by Char (new)

Char  | 13887 comments Mod
I can't narrow it down to just one. These are my favorites:

The Stand
It
The Shining
Salem's Lot


message 6: by Nora aka Diva (new)

Nora aka Diva (DuctTapeDiva) Duma Key, I really liked the storyline & it reminded of several books that Koontz has written
;)


message 7: by Daniel (new)

Daniel Powell | 4 comments The Dead Zone is my favorite stand-alone novel.

Wizard and Glass is my favorite Gunslinger book.

"You Know They Got a Hell of a Band" and "Crouch End" are my favorite short stories.

"The Mist" is my favorite novella.

Sheesh, the man is staggeringly good!


message 8: by Gatorman (new)

Gatorman | 8318 comments Too hard to narrow down the novels into one favorite. Favorite short story is Cain Rose Up from the Skeleton Crew collection.


message 9: by Kilgallen (new)

Kilgallen | 73 comments My all time favorite novel- Insomnia- A whole new take on the aging process.Those creepy little docs with their scissors (shivers)
movie- The Shining although pet semitary scared the crap out of me too.
short story- Survivor Type...ewwwww just ewwwww.


message 10: by William (new)

William Malmborg (williammalmborg) | -13 comments For short stories my favorite is probably 'Children of the Corn'. For short novels it would be 'Secret Window, Secret Garden'. I'm unable to narrow down favorite novel. Maybe I should just say whatever is coming out next is my favorite because I'm always looking forward to it. Two other short stories that I always love are '1408' and 'The Road Virus Heads North'. They don't beat 'Children of the Corn' for first place, but they are always up there.


message 11: by Kev (new)

Kev | 3 comments The Shining. The first King I read and still the best one for me.


message 12: by jb (new)

jb Byrkit (jbbyrkit) | 2035 comments I have only read Carrie and I liked it a lot. I have seen the movie too plus It and The Shining (they were okay).


message 13: by Kurt (new)

Kurt Reichenbaugh (kurtreichenbaugh) | 122 comments Favorite novel by King is Christine, mostly for the depiction of teenagers in the 70's, rock lyrics and good old pulpy horror. Favorite short story is The Raft, just because it came and devoured for no particular reason at all.


message 14: by Shawn (new)

Shawn | 1168 comments Kurt wrote: "Favorite novel by King is Christine, mostly for the depiction of teenagers in the 70's, rock lyrics and good old pulpy horror. Favorite short story is The Raft, just because it came and devoured fo..."

Ohh yeah - for no particular reason at all, that's the key of the MIST right there.

Brilliant story - who wouldn't have
risked "The Raft"?


message 15: by Shawn (new)

Shawn | 1168 comments Kurt wrote: "Favorite novel by King is Christine, mostly for the depiction of teenagers in the 70's, rock lyrics and good old pulpy horror. Favorite short story is The Raft, just because it came and devoured fo..."

Ohh yeah - for no particular reason at all, that's the key of the MIST right there.

Brilliant story - who wouldn't have
risked "The Raft"?


message 16: by Erica (new)

Erica (bookpsycho) | 256 comments My favorite novels are The Dark Tower Series and The Talisman. No other books have ever made me feel so bi-polar in my life. The Talisman was also the first book that ever made me cry. I also love Cycle Of The Werewolf because it was the first S.K. book I ever read.
As for short story, I'd have to say The Boogeyman. As a little girl, I was convinced a boogeyman lived in my closet, so this story brings back those memories. I don't know if that's a good thing..
Movie- the original The Shining. I just absolutely love Jack Nicholson.


message 17: by Traci (new)

Traci Favorite books The Stand and It. Both seemed more "epic" in scale than any other horror novel I've ever read. I also love The Talisman. Was one of my favorite books in high school. And The Green Mile.
Short story, probably Survivor Type. I was just talking about it a few weeks ago. That really stuck with me.
Favorite movies, Shawshank Redemption. I need to watch The Mist still. Pet Sematary. Misery. Stand By Me.


message 18: by Mark (new)

Mark Faulkner (markrfaulkner) | 125 comments Cujo, I'm pretty sure it was that book which got me into horror, a very long time ago. The mist is awesome too.


message 19: by Oliver (new)

Oliver Clarke (oliverclarke) The Shining - I think its the most perfectly formed of his novels. Terrifying, emotionally gripping, deeply personal and lacking the bloat of a lot of his work.
Short stories - probably the two that most stuck with me are Survivor Type (like Traci) and I am the Doorway.


message 20: by Maryann (new)

Maryann (mnjeri) | 24 comments The Long walk is my favourite book. An oldie but i loved all the characters. hooked from the beginning. The dark figure Garraty sees at the end was a perfect ending.
for movies i would have to say Shawshank redemption.
I didnt mind the Green mile too.


message 21: by TJ (new)

TJ (coachtim30) | 41 comments For me it's The Stand. I love the grand scale that it's on and, as is with most of King's work, the characters are fully developed and memorable.


Angela~twistedmind~ (twistedmind) | 63 comments Erica wrote: "My favorite novels are The Dark Tower Series and The Talisman. No other books have ever made me feel so bi-polar in my life. The Talisman was also the first book that ever made me cry. I also lo..."

The Dark Tower Series was one of my favorites, too. Believe it or not, I really liked Lisey's Story, even though I was determined to hate it.


message 23: by Havocvoodoo (new)

Havocvoodoo (wwwgoodreadscomprofilehavocvoodo) | 20 comments Kayla wrote: "My favorite short story is "The Jaunt", probably because it is a science fiction/horror and it has caught me off-guard since I read it, five years ago. My favorite novels by the man would be, on o..."

Oh, wow. I totally forgot about The Jaunt. *shiver*


message 24: by Havocvoodoo (new)

Havocvoodoo (wwwgoodreadscomprofilehavocvoodo) | 20 comments Movie...Misery. Kathy Bates has been one of my favorite actresses ever since.
Book...wow, that's tough. The Stand (the unabridged version) was incredible. After reading for a while, you start to feel like a character yourself, and that's why I've always liked King. He has that affect on you, the reader.
Short Story...The Mist. As a movie, it was...predictable. As a short story, it is creepy as hell and I think it was one of the first stories that made me actually scared. The first foggy day after I read it, I refused to go out until it cleared up...and I was just a kid at that time. I've been reading King since I was in Elementary school.


message 25: by Oliver (new)

Oliver Clarke (oliverclarke) Havocvoodoo wrote: "Movie...Misery. Kathy Bates has been one of my favorite actresses ever since.
Book...wow, that's tough. The Stand (the unabridged version) was incredible. After reading for a while, you start to fe..."


I bet if we did a poll a lot of us King fans started young. I was 12 when I read Christine and 26 years later I'm still hooked.


message 26: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments I think I was 16, and I'm 46 now, although I read only the occasional King book these days. Maybe he appeals to the immature reader, lol?


message 27: by Peter (new)

Peter Meredith (goodreadscompetermeredith) | 25 comments I was about fourteen---Salem's Lot(brr shiver--just thinking about how freaked out I was)


message 28: by Oliver (new)

Oliver Clarke (oliverclarke) Tressa wrote: "I think I was 16, and I'm 46 now, although I read only the occasional King book these days. Maybe he appeals to the immature reader, lol?"

Not sure about that but I do think (risks flame war) that a lot of his themes and characters appeal to people who ate quite insecure, as teenagers often are.


message 29: by Havocvoodoo (new)

Havocvoodoo (wwwgoodreadscomprofilehavocvoodo) | 20 comments Oliver wrote...Not sure about that but I do think (risks flame war) that a lot of his themes and characters appeal to people who ate quite insecure, as teenagers often are.

I think you're right. My first horror book was The Amityville Horror at 10. I think my first King book was The Dead Zone, probably 11ish. I was DEFINITELY insecure, too.


message 30: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments I've mentioned this a few times but have avoided being burned to a crisp so far, his writing IMO is very immature in style and execution. As King himself said, he is the literary equivalent of a Big Mac. I think this kind of lowbrow, everyman style pulls in the young readers.


message 31: by Havocvoodoo (new)

Havocvoodoo (wwwgoodreadscomprofilehavocvoodo) | 20 comments Eeeeeh, I wouldn't call it "lowbrow"...but I do think the quality of his writing has gone down over the years.


message 32: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments It's not Marcel Proust's Remembrance of Things Past. Lowbrow isn't an insult.


message 33: by JohnS2165 (last edited Mar 01, 2012 01:36PM) (new)

JohnS2165 | 7 comments Tressa wrote: "I've mentioned this a few times but have avoided being burned to a crisp so far, his writing IMO is very immature in style and execution. As King himself said, he is the literary equivalent of a Bi..."

I don't disagree, but you could insert the name nearly any author discussed here at H.A. and your post would be just as true. Most horror writers follow the lowbrow, everyman style that King is so good at.


message 34: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments I disagree. There are many horror writers who don't write in a lowbrow style. Are you saying McCammon and Laymon have the same style? And Sarah Langan and Poppy Z. Brite? I'm talking about the style not the subject matter. Scott Smith, Sara Gran, Tim Curran, Jeff Strand, Joe Hill, Sarah Waters, Shirley Jackson, Michel Faber, Michael McDowell, Jack Ketchum, and many others have written mature, literary works in the horror genre.


message 35: by JohnS2165 (new)

JohnS2165 | 7 comments If you're going to say King is very immature in style and execution, lowbrow, and appeals to young readers then yes, I would say the same about 5 of those authors you just named. I feel you've defined much of the genre as whole (much, not all).

But I read the stuff too. So I just had to chuckle at your comments on King. It's fine that you would rather read something other than King, so would I. But please don't tell me those authors you name write mature, literary works of horror. Most of them don't (most, not all).


message 36: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Which ones on my list write immature, non-literary works of horror? Perhaps my definition of literary horror is different than yours.


message 37: by JohnS2165 (new)

JohnS2165 | 7 comments Perhaps it is.


message 38: by Havocvoodoo (last edited Mar 01, 2012 04:01PM) (new)

Havocvoodoo (wwwgoodreadscomprofilehavocvoodo) | 20 comments I think of Clive Barker when you say "literary horror"...Imajica or Weaveworld for example.


message 39: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments For me there's a kind of enjoyable but generic horror with a basic plot (evil comes to town, makes some mischief, people band together and defeat it in the end). It's straightforward, mainstream horror. Then there's horror that mixes it up, things happen that you don't expect, and there are some beautiful, lyrical passages amidst the horror. And, yes, for me, Clive Barker is imaginative and lyrical and his books rise above the mainstream horror plot.

As much as I love Joe Hill, his first novel Heart-Shaped Box fell along the lines of mainstream. However, for me, Horns was many steps above that and it included moments of brilliance and beauty. That is my definition of literary horror. It doesn't have to be more academic like Shirley Jackson or Poe or Lovecraft.


message 40: by Bill (new)

Bill (billymac) In no way do I think King's writing is immature, but I will say that when he opts for action over character development, it could seem that way. But I would say that about any author.

What I love about the guy is how in tune he is, and nostalgic, about what it was like to be a kid. I don't think there is anyone who can come close to evoking those feelings, whether they be warm, loving, or terrified. And jeez, who wasn't insecure or self conscious growing up? Of course his readers would identify with that.

I think he excels when he's writing about matters of the heart, and I think this is getting even stronger as he gets older.


message 41: by Rick (new)

Rick Gualtieri (rickgualtieri) | 46 comments IT remains one of only two horror novels to genuinely (as in check under the bed before going to sleep) frighten me. I typically reread it at least once a year.


message 42: by Greig (new)

Greig Beck (greigbeck) The Mist - it was only a short story that appeared in a collection of works in Skeleton Crew, but had both psychological and (lovecraftian) monster horror - loved it. Though the movie was okay, they squibbed on the harder ending that King imagined.


message 43: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lyons (amandamlyons) Simple doesn't mean immature so I don't think immature is a fair description for King's work. I guess its more of an everyman voice? A storyteller's tone? In any case there's not really anything immature about it it just has its own flow and style, something that goes down smoothly without a whole lot of effort on the reader's part. You read King for the pleasure of it just like you might listen to a fireside tale.


message 44: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Immature in that he still uses fart jokes, poopy humor, and other silly vulgarisms that would make a 13-year-old laugh and a person my age roll his/her eyes. Plus, he's just not literary enough for me, even when he tries hard to be. This isn't to say that I don't occasionally enjoy a book by him. I enjoyed Full Dark immensely.


message 45: by Shawn (new)

Shawn | 1168 comments No novels, because this asked story and I'm all about story...

I'm just gonna let my mind wander to reading NIGHT SHIFT when it was originally released, walking to school....

"Battleground" I loved, pure Richard Matheson. "Trucks" is yet another, simple idea, well told. Really loved "The Ledge", as I'm scared of heights.

I can remember reading "The Jaunt" when it was first published in TWILIGHT ZONE MAGAZINE (I had a subscription) and thinking it was amazing - still my go-to for an example of what works in effective sci-fi/horror hybrids.

Yeah, "The Mist" is outstanding, a 50's b-horror movie in text form. I recently really enjoyed ""That Feeling, You Can Only Say What It Is In French"

I'm sure there are others (oh, "The Woman In The Room", of course) ...but if I had to pick one...

"The Monkey" - AMAZING story about a child realizing what adulthood means, that death is blindly mechanical and unstoppable. Naturalism at it's nastiest.


message 46: by Amanda (new)

Amanda Lyons (amandamlyons) Tressa wrote: "Immature in that he still uses fart jokes, poopy humor, and other silly vulgarisms that would make a 13-year-old laugh and a person my age roll his/her eyes. Plus, he's just not literary enough for..."

Such things are to me that nod to the everyman, perhaps to the folks he grew up around and still lives with? We're not always out for demure humor in blue collar circles. Personally I know i speak differently among such groups than I do when I'm here for example.


message 47: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments I think I'm one of the few his style of writing bothers. It seems like he's doing a Benjamin Button on his writing style IMO: his early books are crisp, mature, and, well, perfect, then over the decades the fart jokes become more numerous.


message 48: by Greig (new)

Greig Beck (greigbeck) Tressa wrote: "I think I'm one of the few his style of writing bothers. It seems like he's doing a Benjamin Button on his writing style IMO: his early books are crisp, mature, and, well, perfect, then over the de..."

Haha - didn't he sober up for his latter books?


message 49: by Tressa (new)

Tressa  (moanalisa) | 19935 comments Greig wrote: "Haha - didn't he sober up for his latter books? ..."

Yep, but by then the damage had been done.


message 50: by Marc-Antoine (new)

Marc-Antoine | 2888 comments I love a good fart joke...


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