Vaginal Fantasy Book Club discussion

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Book Discussion & Recommendation > Spunky, Snarky, Sassy or Sexy? All of the above please

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message 1: by Arroyo0 (new)

Arroyo0 When it comes to V-Fantasy I like the leading female protagonists to be spunky, snarky, sassy and sexy. let me clarify that last one, by sexy I mean as a character not just physically although that doesn't hurt if she isn't a boring airhead.

Is this a good thing or does this make me a male chauvinist pig? Perhaps this make me a juvenile teen with a Buffy crush?
While I'm no teen, and I still have a Buffy crush, I also have a Lisbeth Salander crush.

What do you think a V-Fantasy leading female protagonists should be like?
misunderstood?
Cassandra?
rebellious?
a lovable klutz?


message 2: by Melinda (new)

Melinda VanLone | 51 comments I like my female protagonists to be strong, capable of kicking ass physically, mentally or both, and have a solid self esteem. I like her to be intelligent, but not obnoxious with it. I like her to stand up for herself but not be a bully. Be sexy, but not a whore. I guess basically be true to herself, and never sell herself short. I don't mind if she has to learn how to be all that along the way. If it's a series, then I expect her to take her time learning it. But yes, some change is good. Everybody changes as time goes on. Hopefully for the better.


message 3: by Necrophidian (new)

Necrophidian | 74 comments A person, fully realized.

That about sums it up. :)


message 4: by Cassi (new)

Cassi Reed (amethstdrgn) | 13 comments As a writer I try to make my female leads just like you all have described in your posts. My writing motto is "Strong Men, Stronger Women". That doesn't mean that I make my male characters any less than the women, but my strong women don't let anyone walk all over them, the love interest included. I love kick ass female characters that can think for themselves and still be feminine enough a lover for their lovers.


message 5: by Sidsel (new)

Sidsel Pedersen (macthekat) As long as the lead isn't whiny and is believable then like it. Of course non of the above hurts but they are by no means a must.


message 6: by Kate (new)

Kate (kathenwood) | 8 comments My criteria for protagonists change between books, but as several people have already said, I like them to be consistent, whatever the character traits.
Mostly, though, I like characters whose love interests complete them. In real life, we look for people who match us, weakness to strength, and make us whole. I like to see that sort of imperfect personality match in a protagonist.
As for my personal favorite personality traits? Spunky, out-going, maybe a little oblivious (because that makes the burgeoning romance fun for me to read), fit but not physical. I don't like overpoweringly attractive people because they are, well, overpowering. I like the ones that are cute, or pretty, without being devastatingly beautiful.


message 7: by Robert (new)

Robert Stubbs | 15 comments I like the snarky smart arse woman who can kick butt in some way either physically, mentally or spiritually. She doesn't have to be better than all the other characters but she should stand out in some way.


message 8: by Malin (new)

Malin (maline) | 43 comments I don't need the heroine to be totally kick-ass in every situation, but she needs to be CAPABLE, and able to adapt to things. There is nothing worse than a TSTL heroine who you just want to slap some sense into all the time. I don't mind if they have flaws, that's usually a lot more interesting than if they're near Mary Sue territory, but they need to be written consistently, and there needs to be development and character growth, or I just lose interest.

Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum series is a good example. She doesn't seem to learn any lessons, or grow or act differently at all, despite 18 books passing in the series, unless it's to become even more ditzy, selfish and oblivious. That's not good, and makes me stop reading.


message 9: by Arroyo0 (new)

Arroyo0 Malin Engdahl wrote: "...Janet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum series is a good example. She doesn't seem to learn any lessons, or grow or act differently at all, despite 18 books passing in the series, unless it's to become even more ditzy, selfish and oblivious. That's not good, and makes me stop reading."

While I do enjoy following the Stephanie Plum train wreck, you make a very good point!


message 10: by Michele (new)

Michele (nerdmichele) | 74 comments Malin, I think you've just solved why I never really wanted to go back to that series after book 12, even though I adored the early novels. :(


message 11: by Stina Ruedas (new)

Stina Ruedas | 1 comments Ok, so I've been hooked on the Song of Fire and Ice books since I picked up A Game of Thrones Last month. These are truly strong fantasy women all in their own right.

Catelyn is the perfect example of 'duty, family, honor.'
Arya and her rebellious nature that's true to herself being "more wolf than she ever was a 'Lady'" I could gush about her but I don't want to spoil any surprised for those of you just watching the show on HBO.
Cersei Lanister has her strengths. Her ambitions are to be admired in a way all their own. She takes matters into her own hands and builds deep plots to rise higher than even her father or bothers or sons "They should have put a sword in MY hands, not just Jamie".
Sansa is young but grows to learn just how naive she really has been "A Lady's courtesy is her armor".
Brienne of Tarth - HOLY MAJOLLY. This 'wench' knight is probably more knight than even the knights of the kingsguard. While being shy about her manly size and features she's a woman under all that plate mail and her character is written from the perspective of any woman that's ever had to step into a true 'man's world'

I think a solid female protagonist should be everything a solid male protagonist should be.


message 12: by Arroyo0 (last edited Mar 04, 2012 12:12AM) (new)

Arroyo0 Stina wrote: "...Brienne of Tarth - HOLY MAJOLLY. This 'wench' knight is probably more knight than even the knights of the kingsguard. ..."

Brienne of Tarth is my favorite female protagonist in Song of Ice and Fire. She isn't snarky, sassy or sexy but has enough spunk, and honor to make up for it and then some!


message 13: by Kamil (new)

Kamil | 938 comments I think a good female lead, first of all, shouldn't be a "damsel in distress"( one that needs to be rescued, fragile) niether a "Mary Sue" ( invincible one capable of anything in any situations).
She should be human ( not as her species, but human as one that has her good and bad points)
if she can kick ass, praise to the author, but she should have some weekspots (like Buffy wishing for a normal life)one that believes in fairytales, but walks whith her feets on the ground


message 14: by Madison E. (new)

Madison E. (madiemartin) | 231 comments Stina wrote: "Ok, so I've been hooked on the Song of Fire and Ice books since I picked up A Game of Thrones Last month. These are truly strong fantasy women all in their own right.

Catelyn is the perfect examp..."


That series is very very good. One of the main reasons is that is has excellent character development (there are LOTS of characters). You bring up good points. I'm surprised though, no comment on Dany? :-P


message 15: by Kamil (new)

Kamil | 938 comments the proablem whith lead female character is that it's easy to exagerate and make her appear the way she wasn't ment to be


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