Oryx and Crake (MaddAddam, #1) Oryx and Crake question


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Are the genders presented as believable characters?


Funny, one of the main problems I had with this book was the lack of depth to the female characters. Oryx in particular seemed like a complete cypher, which is unfortunate given that she had the book partly named after her.

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Ryan Morris That WAS the point of her character. It was meant to leave you asking how much of her was manufactured by Crake since he "saw 30 moves ahead in chess" ...more
Jun 05, 2014 12:31PM · flag

I dunno about that... Atwood tends to write a number of male characters as nasty in similar ways and Oryx and Crake does not really stray from this. Males being sexually exploitative being one of her most commonly used expressions for this. In contrast, she writes a wide variety of female characters with distinct motivations, desires and aspirations- from the girl and her sister in Blind Assassin, to the kids in Cat's Eye, to the very distinct despite their identical dress women in Handmaid's Tale.


Disappointed in the actions of the male characters or their believability?


It has been so long since I read this book, but if I recall the characters correctly, there was no overt stereotypically male or female character. EAch person has his/her own personality, at least until you get to the part where the new species of human has flaming colored genitalia and responds atavistically to being near the opposite sex. Science has since proven that even insects can have life mates, so I don't believe that homo sapiens will completely lose its humanity as easily as it occurred in this book.


I had no problems with the believability of the male characters. They were distinct from one another and complex. As for being sexually exploitative, as another commenter suggested, I suppose so, but that didn't make the characters any less believable or unique. They were too multi-dimensional for any one facet to define them like that.

C.S.


I'm confused by the question but if you mean can Margaret Atwood write for a believable male character? Well the answer is, 'Yes! ', very well in fact.


I was disappointed in the characters.


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