The Mystery, Crime, and Thriller Group discussion

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Report for Duty > Mystery Author and Reader

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message 1: by Sam (last edited Feb 16, 2012 02:12PM) (new)

Sam Thomas (samuelthomas) Hi All,

I'm new here - obviously - and really looking forward to linking up with everyone.

My debut novel THE MIDWIFE'S TALE: A MYSTERY is due out from Minotaur/St. Martin's early next year, and I'm in the midst of writing the sequel and trying my hand at short stories.

For the bored and curious:
Website: [url]http://www.samuelthomasbooks.com[/url]
Twitter: @samthomasbooks

I'm also going to do some publicity work for the Debut Authors program over at International Thriller Writers...if you're interested in joining, drop me a note!

Best,

Sam


message 2: by Hayes, Co-Moderator (new)

Hayes (hayes13) | 2060 comments Mod
Hi Sam. Welcome to the group.


message 3: by Christine (new)

Christine Hatfield  (christinesbookshelves) | 1527 comments It's nice to meet you sam


message 4: by Brian (new)

Brian Meeks (extremelyavg) | 8 comments I'm just starting to get my feet wet here at goodreads, it seems like a very friendly place. Welcome.


message 5: by Hayes, Co-Moderator (last edited Feb 21, 2012 08:57AM) (new)

Hayes (hayes13) | 2060 comments Mod
Hi Brian. Just give a shout if you need help with anything. Take a look at "Techno Corner" too: http://www.goodreads.com/topic/group_...


message 6: by Christine (new)

Christine Hatfield  (christinesbookshelves) | 1527 comments It's nice to meet you hayes


message 7: by Brian (new)

Brian Meeks (extremelyavg) | 8 comments Hayes wrote: "Hi Brian. Just give a shout if you need help with anything. Take a look at "Techno Corner" too: http://www.goodreads.com/topic/group_..."


Thanks, I'm going there now. :-)


message 8: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
Welcome Sam and Brian


message 9: by Christine (new)

Christine Hatfield  (christinesbookshelves) | 1527 comments It's nice to meet you donna and brian


message 10: by Brian (new)

Brian Meeks (extremelyavg) | 8 comments It is nice to be here. I think the most difficult part of being involved in Goodreads, was making it a part of my social media routine. Now, I look forward to checking in.


message 11: by Christine (new)

Christine Hatfield  (christinesbookshelves) | 1527 comments So what's your favorite book to read?


message 12: by Brian (new)

Brian Meeks (extremelyavg) | 8 comments There are very few books that I read over and over again, but my favorite is Candide by Voltaire. It makes me laugh even after all these years.


message 13: by Christine (new)

Christine Hatfield  (christinesbookshelves) | 1527 comments My favorite book is called sickened by julie gregory


message 14: by Georgia (new)

Georgia | 536 comments My all time favorite book is The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky by Fydor Dostoyevsky, but as far as mysteries go, I have loved a lot of them. One that always "sticks" out in my mind is The Silence of the Wind by Carlos Luis Zafon


message 15: by Georgia (new)

Georgia | 536 comments Read Candide in my college days. Liked it then, the adventures, etc, but now I'm just "tilling my own garden."


message 16: by Christine (new)

Christine Hatfield  (christinesbookshelves) | 1527 comments I wouldn't like reading those books


message 17: by Charles (last edited Feb 27, 2012 08:45AM) (new)

Charles Georgia wrote: "My all time favorite book is The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevskyby Fydor Dostoyevsky, but as far as mysteries go, I have loved a lot of them. One that always "sticks" out in my mind is The Sil..."

Since you mention Dostoevsky, what do you-all think of Crime and Punishment as a crime novel? Not a mystery, I think, but the detective Porfiry Petrovich is an interesting one. He fingers Raskolnikov by insight the way Maigret does and wears him down like Slimane in Pepe le Moku (Algiers). Earliest example of this behavior, I think, and first government official detective in literature -- Dickens's Bucket in 1851 was a P.I.


message 18: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
If you like Porfiry Petrovich have you read the series by R. N. Morris that begins with The Gentle Axe? I enjoyed this first one in the series and I hope to read more.


message 19: by Jan C (new)

Jan C (woeisme) | 35576 comments Donna wrote: "If you like Porfiry Petrovich have you read the series by R. N. Morris that begins with The Gentle Axe? I enjoyed this first one in the series and I hope to read more."

Do you need to have read Crime and Punishment first?

I've never tried it - but this one sounds interesting.


message 20: by Donna, Co-Moderator (new)

Donna | 2178 comments Mod
I read Crime and Punishment such a long time ago that I really don't remember much of it so I would have to say no you don't need to have read it to enjoy the R. N. Morris series. That said, maybe a quick read of a synopsis of Crime and Punishment would give you enough of the basics of the story and background to make the Morris series more interesting.


message 21: by Charles (new)

Charles I don't suppose you need to read C&P for anything other than a lit class, really. And in the large it's not really a crime novel, it's about guilt and expiation. Question: examples of crime or detective novels which foreground the criminal after the crime rather than the detective? How the criminal feels about what he did, how he feels the detective getting closer and fights to evade him, how it feels to get caught and punished? This is how C&P goes. Surely there are other novels that work this way.


message 22: by Christine (new)

Christine Hatfield  (christinesbookshelves) | 1527 comments It's nice to meet you charles and donna


message 23: by Charles (new)

Charles Nostalgia corner. There is a series from my childhood which may be the first detective stories I ever read. Has anyone heard of Freddy the Pig?


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