Mount TBR Reading Challenge 2012 discussion

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Level 1: Pike's Peak > Jeannette's List

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message 1: by [deleted user] (last edited Feb 15, 2012 03:39PM) (new)


message 2: by Bev (new)

Bev | 214 comments Mod
A Tale of Two Cities in on my list too. It's been hanging out on my TBR list for almost 30 years (yikes!)--ever since high school. Hope you like Tey--she's one of my favorites!


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

I tackled Dumas, and thought it was time to finally read Dickens. I picked up Tey for $1 at my library's book sale last year! :)


message 4: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 198 comments I loved Tale of Two Cities.


message 5: by Kim (new)

Kim (kimmr) A Tale of Two Cities is on my list too. I've read very little Dickens in the past - only Oliver Twist, Great Expectations and Bleak House. Bleak House is the only one that I really loved. I'm hoping to really like A Tale of Two Cities.


message 6: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) Buddy Read? This summer for ATO2C? I'd love to read that one as well, and I'm sure I'll need help with the history, etc.


message 7: by Jemidar (last edited Feb 16, 2012 12:27AM) (new)

Jemidar | 358 comments Mark me down for A Tale of Two Cities as it's been on my 'been meaning to' read list since I saw the old black and white movie in my teens. It's also been sitting on my Kindle since May last year so more than qualifies for this challenge :-).

Actually, I have tried to read it a number of times over the years but always seem to get stuck at the first paragraph, because by the time I've waded through this

"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to heaven, we were all going direct the other way - in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only."

my eyes have glazed over and I've lost the will to live! Unfortunately, I've got to get thorough this (and more!) before I get to the good stuff.

"It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known."

Le sigh...


message 8: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 198 comments The best opening and closing lines in a book IMO. That's one I'll need to read again. I know much more about the revolution now and I suspect I'll appreciate it that much more.


message 9: by [deleted user] (new)

Hayes wrote: "Buddy Read? This summer for ATO2C? I'd love to read that one as well, and I'm sure I'll need help with the history, etc."

Count me in for the buddy-read!

Just curious -- how long is the unabridged version? I had imagined this as another door stopper, but it's less than 400 pages.


message 10: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) "Only" 400 pages, eh? How one's perspective changes after The Count!


message 11: by [deleted user] (new)

Yeah, I always thought this was a long book! It's really only standard novel length. ;)


message 12: by Hannah (new)

Hannah (hannahr) Your #8 is right up my alley. I'll be looking out for your thoughts on it, as I always enjoy a good polar book.


message 13: by [deleted user] (new)

I'll be posting links to my reviews.


message 14: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) That's a good idea Jeannette!


message 15: by Hannah (new)

Hannah (hannahr) Jeannette wrote: "I'll be posting links to my reviews."

Excellent.


message 16: by [deleted user] (new)

I hope other people do the same.


message 17: by Diane (new)

Diane  (dianedj) Count me in for the summer buddy read of Dickens!


message 18: by [deleted user] (new)

All right! :)


message 19: by [deleted user] (new)

Two down for me. My reviews for:

1. Count of Monte Cristo

12. The Building of Jalna


message 20: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) Yay!


message 21: by [deleted user] (new)

It's thanks to you that I can claim the Count! :)


message 22: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) Which I think should "count" for 3 books!


message 23: by [deleted user] (new)

hahaha!


message 24: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) I'm still plugging away at Vikram Seth... that should definitely count for at least 3 books.


message 25: by [deleted user] (new)

With a title like that (or is that the author's name?)!


message 26: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) That's the author: Vikram Seth, A Suitable Boy


message 27: by Jemidar (new)

Jemidar | 358 comments Author's name. A Suitable Boy Hayes?


message 28: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) Snap! yes... A Suitable Boy.


message 29: by [deleted user] (new)

This is the book you're dragging on, yes?


message 30: by Jemidar (new)

Jemidar | 358 comments I remember the agonies my mother went through when she tried to read that.


message 31: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) I'm reading 50 pages a week... it's great, but very heavy (1 volume, 1400+ pages), small print, and I can't go much faster.


message 32: by Geevee (last edited Mar 02, 2012 12:09PM) (new)

Geevee Jeannette wrote: "Two down for me. My reviews for:
1. Count of Monte Cristo"


A great review Jeanette - another added to my TBR...er I think that's a thanks too for making it just a little (well 1000 pages) higher.


message 33: by Kim (new)

Kim (kimmr) As I've told Hayes elsewhere, I loved A Suitable Boy, although it occupied my life for a full month.


message 34: by Hayes (new)

Hayes (hayes13) Geevee, don't worry, it goes quickly does "The Count". But Kim knows that I'll take longer than a month for "Boy".


message 35: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks, Geevee! The Count was surprisingly fast. You just want to read it, and the chapters are short (10-20 pages). Get the Robin Buss translation, if you can.

I had never attempted a book of that length before, but Hayes and Kim and I did a group read, with a few other people, and that made it even more interesting.


message 36: by [deleted user] (new)

Kim wrote: "As I've told Hayes elsewhere, I loved A Suitable Boy, although it occupied my life for a full month."

Now I'm curious enough to look at your review.


message 37: by Kim (new)

Kim (kimmr) No review, just a rating. I read it 15 years ago!


message 38: by [deleted user] (new)

I read through most of the positive reviews, and one negative. It does sound interesting, but 1475 pages seems a bit daunting!


message 39: by [deleted user] (last edited Mar 07, 2012 07:26AM) (new)

Third one finished:

7. The War of the Worlds

Of course, I'm odd man out again. I just didn't enjoy this all that much.


message 40: by Jemidar (new)

Jemidar | 358 comments You are not the only one as War of the Worlds was DNF for me. I'm not at all a fan of Wells.


message 41: by Misfit (new)

Misfit | 198 comments I loved the movie, but I don't believe I've ever read the book.


message 42: by Jemidar (new)

Jemidar | 358 comments The movie isn't bad but I didn't like the book.


message 43: by [deleted user] (new)

I'm glad to know I'm not alone, :)


message 44: by Geevee (new)

Geevee Jeannette wrote: "Third one finished:

7. The War of the Worlds

Of course, I'm odd man out again. I just didn't enjoy this all that much."


I liked it but if we all liked the same it wouldn't be much fun either.


message 45: by [deleted user] (new)

Thanks, Geevee! I always feel that I dislike people's favorite books on a regular basis. :( (But, my friends put up with me, anyway.)


message 46: by Geevee (new)

Geevee I find "classics" an intriguing area in relation to the behaviour of readers - and certainly me - more than any other.

It's as though we feel we really must like a piece of literature or an author's work because of what it (or the title) is or the standing that the writer has. When we don't like one - and this has come up in conversation I've had with friends - we almost feel a need to apologise.

For example, I've still not managed a Dickens book and yet whilst I can read heavyweight non-fiction, I just can't seem to connect with his writing even though millions have. I want to and, here's the point I really feel I ought to, especially as I enjoy the films and theatre productions. Odd eh?


message 47: by Hayes (last edited Mar 07, 2012 02:01PM) (new)

Hayes (hayes13) Geevee wrote: "For example, I've still not managed a Dickens book..."

I might have to stop talking to you, Geevee. (just kidding!)

I find Dickens pretty hit and miss, actually. Adore Great Expectations, although I hated it at school. Have tried Pickwick Papers a few times and can't get anywhere with it. Am looking forward to the group read of A Tales of 2 Cities, because I know I wont get through it otherwise. Oliver Twist is loathsome (can't get that music out of my head!)

As to whether one "ought to", or not, is such a sticky issue, isn't it? I feel I ought to read ATo2C mostly for the historical content, not for any literary merit.

(On a related note: it's Alessandro Manzoni's birthday today, but you wont catch me reading The Betrothed any time soon! zzzzzz....)


message 48: by [deleted user] (new)

It's true, I feel that I "ought" to read the classics. But, I typically "apologize" when the majority of the people I know love a book I only find passable. I don't want people to think my taste (or distaste) is a reflection on them. It just seems to be occurring more regularly since GR, as I am involved in this wonderful community of readers. Now, I have people to share my likes and dislikes with.

Geevee, if you're up for it, please join our Dickens' buddy-read! I can't remember if you signed on for it, or not!

Happy Birthday, Alessandro! (*never heard of him* lol)


message 49: by Catie (new)

Catie (gollywollypogs) | 53 comments I'd like to join the To2C buddy read as well if I can. I haven't read any whole Dickens novels since I left school many many years ago. Usually I get half way through quite qickly but then drift off. A group read could be just what I need to get me through.
I di like The War of the Worlds when I read it some time back but part of the fun was knowing the places where it all happens, I think.


message 50: by [deleted user] (new)

We'll be reading To2C in the summer; the more the merrier! :D I guess I'll ask Bev if she minds if we set up a thread here in the group.

Now that you mention it, part of the problem I had with WotW was all of the place names. Some of them I "know" from literature, or movies, but without an atlas, it became a long list of disconnected places for me.


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