Lord of the Flies Lord of the Flies discussion


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Is this book any good?

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message 1: by Remy (new) - added it

Remy I started reading it of my own accord a few days ago, and I'm on page eleven and already I'm relating it to Catcher in the Rye. So far it's boring, nothing has happened, there's no deductible plot... Is it worth my time? I've heard that guys prefer it because it's 'about what boys really do' (- Stephen king). I'm a girl (sometimes). I just want to know if it picks up an when, and if it's really worth my time.


Will IV This isn't about "what boys really do" at all. It is darkly symbolic. This is about human nature, it's about the collapse of a society, it's about the "beast" inside of us.

Keep reading, please.


message 3: by Remy (new) - added it

Remy I got the phrase 'what boys really do' from Stephen King's foreword to the copy I bought.


Charity 🐘 Heavy on symbolism and the "Big Picture" about life and human nature. Utterly boring. Read it, just so you can say you have, not for a life-changing experience.


message 5: by Ann (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ann Gimpel Well, when it was written, it was considered cutting edge. Keep in mind that writing styles have changed considerably in the last forty or fifty years. I can see how a modern reader might find it dull.


Licha I had to read it in high school and I remember not liking it and that it was somewhat boring. However, I plan to read it again because i'm not sure if that was the way I perceived it at that young age. I do think it's a book you should read. Whether you like it is a different story. But do stick with it just like Will said. There is more to it than boys running amok on an island.


Nathaniel Bertram It's a great book if you look at it the right way. It's much more about the symbolic whole than the actual events occurring in the story. The island is a microcosm for society itself, and the conflict acts as an exploration of human nature (i.e. what happens when societies inhibitions are removed).


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Will wrote: "This isn't about "what boys really do" at all. It is darkly symbolic. This is about human nature, it's about the collapse of a society, it's about the "beast" inside of us.

Keep reading, please."


I agree with Will, it's a classic and with good reason.


Isabella Tugman - Audiobook Narrator I'm a girl, and I liked it Lord of the Flies a lot.

But... I didn't like Catcher in the Rye at all.


message 10: by [deleted user] (new)

Ditto the girl thing. I liked Catcher in the Rye, but I thought Salinger was a bit pretentious.


Christos Tsotsos Shana wrote: "I got the phrase 'what boys really do' from Stephen King's foreword to the copy I bought."

There must be some more words prior to that otherwise Stephen King sounds like an idiot.


Keerthana Yes it is. It really shows you what human nature is like. I would have enjoyed it more if I didn't have to analyze it for class.


message 13: by Ray (new) - rated it 5 stars

Ray Van Horn, Jr. Keep with it. This is Sociology 101 brought down to its bare bones through children's disrupted norms. As far as I'm concerned, Jeff Probst consulted Lord of the Flies for Survivor before Castaway. Absolutely a magnificent epic you should be familiar with.


message 14: by Remy (new) - added it

Remy Christos wrote: "Shana wrote: "I got the phrase 'what boys really do' from Stephen King's foreword to the copy I bought."

There must be some more words prior to that otherwise Stephen King sounds like an idiot."


Well he basically told a little story that when he was a kid, this mobile library came to town and he asked the driver/librarian lady if they "had any books about what boys really do" and she gave him that from the young adult section (he was the age to look in the children's section)


Christos Tsotsos Shana wrote: "Christos wrote: "Shana wrote: "I got the phrase 'what boys really do' from Stephen King's foreword to the copy I bought."

There must be some more words prior to that otherwise Stephen King sounds ..."


:)


Valerie It's a great book. I does get better. I know we all expect more excitement thanks to TV but it is a great book about people and their behavior. In the absolute least you will understand all the TV and movie references to the book, it's popular for that because its message. I'm surprised at all the literary messages and things I would have missed had I not read so many classics, it makes me wonder how many I'm missing that I have not read.


message 17: by Remy (new) - added it

Remy I didn't expect excitement from TV, it was King's foreword that hyped it up to more than it started out to be.

Have you read The Great Gatsby? If you haven't you should.


Rachael I found this book quite plain. I tend not to read into the under-lying meaning of text qand take a story for exactly what it is so perhaps that is why i did not really enjoy it.

I really struggled to get through this book and i can agree that it read somewhat like Catcher in the Rye, in the way that nothing really happened.

I can see what the writer was trying to compell but the way i analyse books may be different to other people.


message 19: by C (new) - rated it 4 stars

C I really liked it and frankly, it's short enough that even it you are not that into it yet, it won't take much effort to finish.

As for all the readers who only read it in high school, I have found that most books read as required reading in school are awful but those same books can be great if you read them on your own years later. CAN is the operative word as sometimes a reader doesn't like a book regardless. I've been making it a point to go back and reread alot of the books I struggled to get through in school. It's been a (mostly) refreshing experience.


message 20: by Matt (new) - rated it 1 star

Matt Posner It's a clumsily written and mediocre book that has become popular in American schools because it is easy to teach. It builds on the theme "mankind away from civilization becomes brutal and heartless" and has some easily explained symbols. However, its conceit is false. I know many fellow-teachers who teach this book and students who have had a variety of reactions to it. Saying "It's boring" doesn't mean much to me as students find over 90% of what is taught to them in English class to be boring. However, if you were to tell me "this book's message rings false, and I don't accept the idea that, apart from constraints of civilization, human beings put aside any hope of decency and become viciously destructive" then that I would respect.


message 21: by [deleted user] (last edited Feb 15, 2012 03:16PM) (new)

I read this book in High School. It was boring as hell. Don't recommend it to anyone unless you dislike that person and want to make them suffer.


message 22: by C (new) - rated it 4 stars

C Matt wrote: "It's a clumsily written and mediocre book that has become popular in American schools because it is easy to teach. It builds on the theme "mankind away from civilization becomes brutal and heartles..."

I agree that the writing is sometimes clumsy, but I'd say that for the time it was written, it was not too bad. As for disliking a novel for its message, I agree that that has merit but I think it's sometimes valid to look beyond whether we agree with it or not. For example although I don't really agree with the idea set forth in Camus' "The Plague" - that we have no control over life - I still respect it as a book and enjoyed reading it.


message 23: by J.G. (new) - rated it 5 stars

J.G. Wilson I loved the book. It's a great plot, great adventure, great horror novel. You should read it.


Bobby The message in its day was perfect. It has been rewritten in different forms now many times so the original intent has been watered down. Wonderful book in it's day and still a fantastic read.


LeeAnna No, its horrible. Its the worst book I have ever read.


message 26: by [deleted user] (new)

Long live difference!


Christos Tsotsos Georgina wrote: "Long live difference!"

ditto!!


message 28: by [deleted user] (new)

:)


Cmkage I had to read this book at school as well, and I really hated it to be honest.


Fatimah im currently reading it...and i think this book is mostly a boys book, and its really boring, im just not catching the feeling!


Christos Tsotsos Fatimah wrote: "i think this book is mostly a boys book"

keep reading! you got the wrong impression thus far ;)


Fatimah okay ill try :) i hope it gets better!


message 33: by [deleted user] (new)

To me it was and always will be a profound work. It tackles the question of man or beast. What part cultural conditions and environment plays in forming a personality and behaviour. Golding again tackles similar issues, and looks at our origins as homo sapiens in his book 'The Inheritors'. Zola also looks at genes and environment in his wonderful series of books.

It's a shame required reading at school sometimes turns a person off a book. It's something to do with being forced to read it, rather than finding it at the appropriate time. We all have book moods, don't we?


message 34: by Remy (new) - added it

Remy I was forced to read Of Mice and Men not too many months ago, and we've been through it so often that I can't stand it any more.


message 35: by [deleted user] (new)

Shana wrote: "I was forced to read Of Mice and Men not too many months ago, and we've been through it so often that I can't stand it any more."

I felt like that about art when I first finished artschool. Took a few years to make it my own again. Then the love returned.

Also a boring teacher can ruin a good book or subject (IMO).


message 36: by Remy (new) - added it

Remy I took art as my year 10-11 option in secondary School (England) I really hated it from the start because we weren't doing the stuff we chose to do. As in, we were only drawing what the teacher told us to do.#

I got a lot more into it when we started projects of our own choosing. And at the same time, I found someone I really love, and she motivated me to do more art.

I'm picking Art for sixth form because of that.

We didn't have a boring teacher for OMAM, she's brilliant. It's just that I feel like I've read the book about 20 times.


Sarah Briggs I think that if you look at it from the young boys' point of view it's really demented and crazy how much you realize that we are showing the kids that kind of behavior thru wars and what not, but if you look at it as an overall story, I liked it alot better than OMAM. :) Both not the worst books I've ever read, but not my number one. :/ I think the worst I've ever read was Perks of Being A Wallflower. Ick!


message 38: by [deleted user] (new)

Shana wrote: "I took art as my year 10-11 option in secondary School (England) I really hated it from the start because we weren't doing the stuff we chose to do. As in, we were only drawing what the teacher tol..."

Love is a great inspiration for art. Knowing that people enjoy what you create keeps you going. Same goes for writing.

Yes, it's the close analysis of a book, involving dissecting and interpreting each and every paragraph that can make a book go stale (IMO).


Mochaspresso While I did enjoy the book, I do think that the movie adaptations are better.


message 40: by Casey (new) - rated it 1 star

Casey I was really hard to read for me. I read it though when I was a Freshman in High School. It only got really interesting to me towards the middle and through the end. I just remember hating it. Now that I'm older I think of it as the childs version of LOST. Or LOST is the grown up version of Lord of the Flies. With a plane crash, then a "beasty", forming tribes and leaders. I thought it was strange to read then so I should probably try reading it again now that I'm older. I think sometimes as young kids we can't really grasp the meaning of these books till we grow up a little bit and experience life.


message 41: by Remy (new) - added it

Remy Sarah wrote: "I think that if you look at it from the young boys' point of view it's really demented and crazy how much you realize that we are showing the kids that kind of behavior thru wars and what not, but ..."

Perks of Being a Wallflower is my favourite book in the entire world. It is basically a book of my life and I will cherish it forever, as will my girlfriend, as I read it to her and it's the only book she's ever cried at.

What are the movie adaptations called?


Jonathan Fore I read this book for the first time just a few years ago, perhaps when I was in my late thirties. I thought it was a great story, one of the best. Hard to get it started, but when it's all over, you certainly remember it.


ℂᖺαᖇᒪἷ℮ ⊰1017 &Tardis⊱ No!!!!!! I had to read this for class and I barely read it. Yay for sparknotes!!!


Tanvi Will wrote: "This isn't about "what boys really do" at all. It is darkly symbolic. This is about human nature, it's about the collapse of a society, it's about the "beast" inside of us.

Keep reading, please."


well put.


Tanvi Well, there are some books that aren't really 'fun' to read, or aren't amusing enough. But they leave you with a wisdom that is, indeed, precious.
This book is one of them...


Shanna Ok I'm ambivalent about this book. It was a set reader for english, so I went in to it as a teenager with a preconceived notion it would be boring. It wasn't, it was anything but... but I was horrified, I don't, can't, believe boys/men are really like this, that this lurks below the surface. I came out still horrified and but it changed something I don't know quite what but something... It's worth reading it changes your world view somewhat, read it and make up your own mind that's my advice.


Tanvi Are, it's not simply about boys or men guys...!!! They are symbols...!!! its about mankind in general...


message 49: by Remy (new) - added it

Remy This: '...!!!' isn't needed, okay? Just, no. That's bad use of punctuation. Bad.


Tanvi Yeah, that was out of exasperation cos so many people have termed it a guy thing above...


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