Dreamspinner Press discussion

32 views
Meet the Author > Meet Sarah Madison and S.A. Garcia

Comments Showing 1-50 of 220 (220 new)    post a comment »
« previous 1 3 4 5

message 1: by Dreamspinner (new)

Dreamspinner Press (dreamspinnerpress) | 2637 comments Mod
S.A. Garcia and Sarah Madison will be joining us from 12-6 Eastern time to discuss their books, answer questions, and more!


message 2: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Moving the furniture, checking the flowers, adjusting the picture frames...


message 3: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Well, according to my computer it's 12:00. Time to begin the festivities. I'm S.A. Garcia, writer and silly person prone to sticking my foot in my mouth.

I have three books with Dreamspinner, the latest which is Divine Devine's Love Song, a sci-fi romance set in a devastated future.

Here's the spiffy cover:

Divine Devine's Love Song by S.A. Garcia

It's different from the normal m/m covers but that's fitting since the story is also different.


message 4: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments I hope my co-host isn't stuck in cyber-traffic.


message 5: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Here's the blurb for Divine Devine's Love Song. It's a great blurb. Blurbs are such wicked critters. Sometimes they appear friendly until you realize they've turned on you and don't quite convey a book's true nature. This blurb is perfect.

DDLS's blurb:

In a world destroyed by nuclear mismanagement, a deformed young man named Trill finds an intact Netpad. Once he secures a working battery, he discovers a story penned by Sam Devine, a hacker who led a rebellion against the insane corporation BCM thirty years previously.

Sam works for BCM out of necessity rather than choice. He despises the company for its lack of ethics and knows the best way to destroy it is from within. When a meeting opens with the torture of BCM's captive enemies, Sam receives his chance: he lies to convince his bosses he wants to further degrade one of the warriors, a man named Pokatawer. Once Pokatawer is released to Sam, he finds they share common goals and lusts.

But Sam and Pokatawer are up against a hugely powerful corporation, and they’ll have to bring BCM to its knees to escape nuclear wrath and make a life for themselves somewhere outside the company's grasp.

I'll post an excerpt soon.


message 6: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments OK, Sarah is going to be a little late. Toxic plants are threatening her horses. Okay, not holding them at gunpoint or anything along those lines, but if her horses eat them, it's bad news.


message 7: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments A fellow writer advised me that folks like to read about recipes. I must admit I was a little "huh?" about the idea.


message 8: by E.E. (new)

E.E. Montgomery | 43 comments Hi S.A.
This is my first chat so can you give me some guidelines on what to do/expect?


message 9: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments E E wrote: "Hi S.A.
This is my first chat so can you give me some guidelines on what to do/expect?"


Hey, EE, thanks for dropping by! Feel free to ask me anything or throw out a topic to discuss.


message 10: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Here's an excerpt from Divine Devine's Love Song And yes, I tried to misspell the name of my own book. *ouch*

Dan dropped onto the chair next to us. "Fine. Make me act like a parrot. What are you doing?"
"Passing justice to another abused human." I gently touched the swarthy, stubbled cheek. What a proud, distinctive face. His strong features looked like something from a misty legend. What did I know about Pamavirgins? "Do you like the ocean? You probably haven’t seen the ocean since BCM destroyed the coast right down to the Carolinas. They built ugly steel walls. They ruined the beach. Not where I am. The sea is ruined, but at least I see it—bad pun—but I see the waves."
There. The closed eyelids trembled. I continued whispering. "You want to see the ocean again, right? BCM stole the ocean away from you. I live on the ocean, and I want to take you there to stay with me. I live right on the ocean’s edge. I live in a house that survives the Howlers. Imagine watching a Howler with me. Imagine the ocean roaring in full might."
Dan moaned in confused agony. He sprang to his feet and poured out a tumbler full of soothing bourbon. Today’s wanton drinking turned expensive for him.
My fingers stroked the massacred hair. Soft bristles teased my flesh. "Listen, I’ll take you away from here. One time someone rescued me, and it thrills me to do the same for another human. Let me rescue you. Give me an ingredient. Talk, and we can watch the ocean together. Imagine watching the mighty water trying to wash the filth away from the sorry shores. The ocean tries to make everything clean. Someday it will win."
The thick black eyelashes trembled again. I relaxed against the wall. "I’ll wait."
Moments ticked past. Instead of barking at me, my overwhelmed Dan slumped back and shut his eyes. His glass barely remained in his fingers. His defeated posture told me how far I traveled here, but his defeated posture also told me he supported me. Bless his determined-to-clutch-comfort heart.
My trembling fingers continued stroking warm flesh. Wrong of me to admire this man, but his impressive physique told me he performed manual labor. He certainly wasn’t like the silly ManH men who played in the one remaining status gym. His hard, solid arm and chest muscles understood grueling work. I must be insane to want to be alone with someone who looked like cracking my back with one firm hug came naturally to him. My naughty gaze examined his thick, potent cock. What a lulu.
Intuition told me if I released this proud, tough man, he’d adhere to his word and not harm me. My intuition told me to trust Dan, and here I sat, alive.
My warrior’s body squirmed in silent struggle. I stiffened in anticipation. Please don’t let him overreact. Please. Eyelids slid open. Green eyes surrounded by appalling dark circles peered up at me in consideration. His cracked lips opened. He swallowed. A word rasped free. "Kudzu."
Wonder filled my soul. "Kudzu."
"The base is kudzu." This time I heard the soft Southern burr spice his raspy voice. He twitched in pain. His eyes rolled up and saw Dan sipping at the bourbon. His gaze focused in amazement. "Care to share, ManH man?"
What did he mean? Right. "Of course." I wagged my hand at Dan, who pressed my glass into my grasp. "Small sips, dude."
"Why?" My bold Pamavirgin gulped down the remaining amber inch and sighed in bliss. A man after my own heart. He took a stern licking and still wanted his drink.
I stared at Dan. "I want these fucking chains and cuffs off this man."
One word choked free. "Hasty."
What? I stared down at the bourbon-loving warrior. "Hasty?"
A faint smile appeared. "The chains are showy nonsense, but keep the cuffs on. Treat me like a dangerous savage. Why should they trust me?" His pained eyes examined me in supreme question. "Will you really take me away from this horrible place?"
"I will."
"I want to see the ocean roaring in fury. I want to see freedom again."
"So be it."
By now Dan sputtered in dread. "Hello, Devine, how are you going to convince them to let you take him away from here?"
Those warm summer eyes gazing at me from the pained purple hollows told me the truth. They told me I still owned a soul. They told me someone trusted me. "The renegade loner needs to work with this special man in peace and quiet. I’m the only man he trusts here. We need peace and quiet to make any progress." I swallowed in disgust. "Tell them I want him as a toy, as a reward. Let me have him, and I’ll make sure the intel flows." My fingers touched the rough infected mark on his neck. "Damn to the depths, he’s been chipped and dipped in a sloppy manner."
"It’s standard procedure for field captives. The bullyboys aren’t picky about the insert jet’s sterile conditions"
"Glad to hear you’re in the know about such nastiness, Dan." I glared at my boss. I acted unfairly, but today everything irritated me. "Go ahead, man in the know. Work your special charms. Go play pocket ball. Tell them I need to take this man with me."
"I hear and obey, you mouthy Brooks bastard. Fine. Only for you." Dan slammed out the lab door.
I acted like an arrogant ass. That time I deserved Dan’s anger. Dan hated thinking he belonged to BCM, but why deny the truth? Bugger, I felt worse. I stared down at my battered new houseguest. "Don’t believe the toy nonsense. I tried to think what they’d believe, tried to think like them, which made me feel sick. What’s your name?"
"Pokatawer."
I blinked in surprise. "Impressive. Native American?"
His eyelids crinkled in expressive glee. "Excellent, ManH man. Good to know someone in this decadent pit understands outside culture. My name is Pamunkey for fire."
"Pamunkey?" The strange word sounded like a children’s game.
"An ancient Native American tribe near RichM. We trace our roots far beyond the white man despoiling the land. When the BCM monsters war against the land, they fight us. Since we do not live in the cities, many tribe members survived the B-Rain. We are a tough breed." A twisted little smile added grim punctuation.
I envisioned Dan’s cropped hair growing even shorter. Boss, guess what, I planned on harboring a radical Native American! Thud. I squirmed in delight. "Excellent. It’s time to make this fire burn free from this damned place. Trust me. Tell me you trust me."
Pokatawer offered me a lopsided grin. "Why not?"
"I need your real trust."
"Why is my trust vital to you?"
Why? "I mean my words. The man who just left the room rescued me from a death sentence. It’s time I passed the gift along to another human."
Pokatawer shook his head. "Really? Yours is a tale for later. I do trust you." He blinked and shuddered. "I ache. Keeping the body limp during torment is difficult on the muscles. I need food, but first I need to sleep if only for a few minutes. The monsters do not allow us sleep. They take pride in keeping us awake. Three days sans sleep is ugly."
My hatred deepened to a darker shade. "Want a little more bourbon?"
"Yes indeed."
I slid out from under my captive and poured out another glassful. He sipped from the glass held to his lips. Those brilliant green eyes grew glassy in bliss. "Who are you?"
"Sam Devine."
Sputtery laughter sounded. "My divine Sam."
Did he hear me wrong? "No, it’s Devine."
"Divine to me." A final smile formed before my battered guest succumbed to tortured exhaustion. His black lashes shut in gentle closure.


message 11: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Ack, the curse of having too many tabs open. I almost closed this page. Ooo, I need hot tea. It's nippy today and we're trying to keep the heat at 60 degrees. Brrr.


message 12: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments My first novella with Dreamspinner, Canes and Scales, is quite different than Divine Devine's Love Song. Canes and Scales is extremely lush and romantic. A few readers accused it of being too "flowery" which is funny. When I'm in the mood, I can dress up a story until it resembles a garden.

Canes and Scales involves a tension-fraught romance between a prince and an Elven bed slave. Yeah, pretty romantic.

Canes and Scales by S.A. Garcia


message 13: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Madison (akasarahmadison) | 174 comments I'm here. Sort of. Has anyone ever tried to conduct a live chast from a Blackberry in the middle of a pasture while simultaneously trying to pull up toxic weeds? Because that's what I'm doing and it looks like I will be here for the next 24 hours. I will answer any questions asked here today. Just don't know when!

Sooo, what I'm dying to know is what makes you as a reader choose one book over another? ;-)


message 14: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca (rebecca_cohen) | 90 comments Hello :)

I'm always interested to read about other writers and how they write. I noticed from your extract that it is written in the first person - is that your preferred point of view to use, and if so why?

Rebecca


message 15: by E.E. (new)

E.E. Montgomery | 43 comments I usually choose based on excerpt. With a paper book I read the first three or four pages before I buy; with an ebook I read the excerpt provided.


message 16: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Sarah wrote: "Sooo, what I'm dying to know is what makes you as a reader choose one book over another? ;-) "

First off, sorry to hear about the weeds! Nasty.

I'll answer the pop quiz. I have to say I tend to follow certain authors and will pretty much buy their books. At times that's bitten me in the brain since I'll purchase even when the reviews are bad. But it's always a thrill to branch out and discover new writers.


message 17: by E.E. (new)

E.E. Montgomery | 43 comments Actually, the excerpt is the final decider. If I've found an author whose writing I like, I go straight to their new book. Otherwise, in order, it's:
title, cover, blurb, excerpt. Kitch titles annoy me so I usually don't go further than that. Covers are important as attention grabbers. The blurb gives me an indication of whether or not I'll like the storyline and the excerpt tells me if I'll actually read it.


message 18: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Rebecca wrote: "Hello :)

I'm always interested to read about other writers and how they write. I noticed from your extract that it is written in the first person - is that your preferred point of view to use, and..."


Hi Rebecca. Thanks for dropping by. I do prefer first person. It feels comfortable for me since that's how I perceive life, never knowing that anyone else is thinking. Blending into another character I have created is a bit like acting. I don't want too much of myself to creep in there.

I would say my favorite style is back and forth first person POVs. That is loads of fun, like conducting a deranged duo.


message 19: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments E E wrote: "I usually choose based on excerpt. With a paper book I read the first three or four pages before I buy; with an ebook I read the excerpt provided."

I have made the mistake of not reading pages from the book. No more.


message 20: by Rebecca (last edited Nov 19, 2011 10:17AM) (new)

Rebecca (rebecca_cohen) | 90 comments S.A. wrote: I would say my favorite style is back and forth first person POVs. That is loads of fun, like conducting a deranged duo. ..."

I think Terry Pratchett once said writing was the most fun you could have on your own ... sounds like you'd agree :)

Good luck with Divine Devine's Love Song - I do love a good bit of sci-fi!


message 21: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments How much angst do readers like in their stories? Do readers think the whole "disruption" scenario is overused? Does "I am walking out on you but since this has a happy ending the reader KNOWS we'll resolve this problem" device grow old?


message 22: by H.B. (new)

H.B. Pattskyn (hbpattskyn) | 174 comments Sarah wrote: "I'm here. Sort of. Has anyone ever tried to conduct a live chast from a Blackberry in the middle of a pasture while simultaneously trying to pull up toxic weeds? Because that's what I'm doing and i..."

urgh--good luck with the weeds! I was so disapointed you couldn't make it to Dragon Con. I truly loved Rain Check. Which is a good jumping off point to answer your question about what makes a reader (at least me) pick one book over another... there are just some things that I like to read about, and others I don't. For a while there were only a couple of authors I'd read at all, but I'm expanding my horizans again. One of the biggest things for me is being comfortable with a writer's style. Not to say one style is better than any other, but I just don't like stuffy, stoic, or minimalist (I just read the Graduate. Blegh. Sorry to anyone who loved that book!) I guess any more and I'd officially be babbling ;-)

~Helen


message 23: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Helen wrote: "...I just don't like stuffy, stoic, or minimalist..."

If you don't like stuffy then never go near Neal Stephenson's work. He gave me a headache within thirty pages.


message 24: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Rebecca wrote: "I think Terry Pratchett once said writing was the most fun you could have on your own ... sounds like you'd agree :)

Good luck with Divine Devine's Love Song - I do love a good bit of sci-fi!


That sounds like something Terry would say! I'm holding off on reading his latest novels because I am so scared I might be reading his last one.

Thanks for the good wishes. I need them!


message 25: by E.E. (new)

E.E. Montgomery | 43 comments S.A. wrote: "How much angst do readers like in their stories? Do readers think the whole "disruption" scenario is overused? Does "I am walking out on you but since this has a happy ending the reader KNOWS we'll..."

Like life, it's the journey that's important. The happy ending is fine, although I prefer an unhappy ending over a happy one if that fits the story and characters better. Happy endings that are forced simply for convention's sake will stop me buying from that author for a while at least. What's really important is the ways the characters deal with the things life throws at them. It's experiencing it with them; the ending is secondary, just a 'feel good' moment to take with us. Give me round, grounded characters with realistic challenges and a realistic ending and I'm happy.


message 26: by Sarah (new)

Sarah Madison (akasarahmadison) | 174 comments These weeds are literally a killer! I almost lost my mare to a bad colic in August--at the time no one thought the weeds were a problem because *normal* horses don't eat them--they are full of sharp spines! We bushhogged the field this morning but now I'm raking and pulling up the remnants by hand. It's a two acre field. I'm going to be here a while :-(

I was bummed about missing D*C too! Did you have a blast? I hope so!

Hmmmmm. I write almost exclusively in third person limited. Is that a problem for anyone? What do you guys prefer as readers? Argh. I'm betting this typing on the tiny keypad and trying to hold conversations while pulling up thorny, tenacious weeds by hand is NOT going to work...


message 27: by H.B. (new)

H.B. Pattskyn (hbpattskyn) | 174 comments S.A. wrote: "How much angst do readers like in their stories? Do readers think the whole "disruption" scenario is overused? Does "I am walking out on you but since this has a happy ending the reader KNOWS we'll..."

I can only speak for myself: I *love* angst in my stories (just not real life!) I also *need* to know going in that it's going to end up happily ever after--for me it's the journey of getting there that makes a book worth reading.

After Russle T. Davies f'ed with my world in Torchwood (television series) I can no longer abide bittersweet of any kind. (I used to love it, but I got soooo invested....and bam. Character death.) So no, I don't mind of the protags break up, have stupid misunderstandings, walk out on each other, whatever, just as long as in the end they ride off into the proverbial sunset together.


message 28: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca (rebecca_cohen) | 90 comments S.A. wrote: "I'm holding off on reading his latest novels because I am so scared I might be reading his last one."

I'm reading Snuff at the mo... I can def recommend it. But I do know what you mean.

I'm sure you won't need the luck - you'll do grand :)


message 29: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca (rebecca_cohen) | 90 comments S.A. wrote: "How much angst do readers like in their stories? Do readers think the whole "disruption" scenario is overused? Does "I am walking out on you but since this has a happy ending the reader KNOWS we'll..."

Put it this way, I've been known to read the last page of story first to make sure it works out ok ;)


message 30: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments E E wrote: "Give me round, grounded characters with realistic challenges and a realistic ending and I'm happy."

I agree. At times the challenges a character faces seem manufactured simply to create the challenge. If you hit a "wait a minute" moment while reading it can bounce you out of the story.


message 31: by H.B. (new)

H.B. Pattskyn (hbpattskyn) | 174 comments S.A. wrote: "Helen wrote: "...I just don't like stuffy, stoic, or minimalist..."

If you don't like stuffy then never go near Neal Stephenson's work. He gave me a headache within thirty pages."


Good to know! That's why for a while I was only reading certain authors/series. I got sick of buying a book, reading two chapters, and then putting it down to collect dust until I got around to putting it in the box for the used book store.


message 32: by E.E. (new)

E.E. Montgomery | 43 comments Sarah wrote: "I write almost exclusively in third person limited. Is that a problem for anyone? What do you guys prefer as readers."

Third person seems to work universally. It seems to be more common and more comfortable so I read it most. It also has the advantage of being able to see what other characters are actually thinking, giving us a view of life in the book that isn't possible in real life. Some stories, though, simply cry out for first person, something closer and more personal. If it's done well, with the right story, first person is magnificent.


message 33: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Helen wrote: "S.A. wrote: "How much angst do readers like in their stories? Do readers think the whole "disruption" scenario is overused? Does "I am walking out on you but since this has a happy ending the reade..."

I hear you about character death. Reading George R.R. Martin is a exercise in character death. I've gotten to the point where I'm fearful to "champion" a character because good old George loves to kill off main characters. Sadist.


message 34: by H.B. (new)

H.B. Pattskyn (hbpattskyn) | 174 comments Sarah wrote: "These weeds are literally a killer! I almost lost my mare to a bad colic in August--at the time no one thought the weeds were a problem because *normal* horses don't eat them--they are full of shar..."

Two acres! Double urgh.

Personally, I love close/limited third person (both reading and writing). It's extremely popular with all of the writers in the critique group I belongn to, most of whom spend more time than I do tracking industry trends.


message 35: by E.E. (new)

E.E. Montgomery | 43 comments Helen wrote: "I got sick of buying a book, reading two chapters, and then putting it down to collect dust until I got around to putting it in the box for the used book store.

I have boxes of books like that. People recommend books to me or give them to me, telling me I'll love them, and I can't get past the first chapter because the writing is long-winded or prosy or just plain boring. The story alone can't hold my attention. I want tight writing full of action and reaction, not full of backstory, info dumps or the writer's philosophy of life that they're sure I'll adopt too if I just listen to them long enough.


message 36: by H.B. (new)

H.B. Pattskyn (hbpattskyn) | 174 comments And yes, Dragon was definitely a blast! It was only our second year--I don't think we'll make next year, but maybe year after.


message 37: by Rebecca (new)

Rebecca (rebecca_cohen) | 90 comments Sarah wrote: "I write almost exclusively in third person limited. Is that a problem for anyone? What do you guys prefer as readers."

I prefer 3rd person generally as a reader (and its what I'm happiest writing) - although one of my all time fave novels (Making History by Stephen Fry) is 1st person so it really depends, and if a story is well written then I'm good (I'm not a fan of 2nd person though If I'm honest!)


message 38: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Sarah wrote: "Hmmmmm. I write almost exclusively in third person limited. Is that a problem for anyone? What do you guys prefer as readers?"

I don't have a preference about POVs when I read, only when I write. I do have a quite a few WIPs which are third person because the characters demand it. No one voice stands out.


message 39: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments E E wrote: "People recommend books to me or give them to me, telling me I'll love them..."

How awkward when a friend loves a book and insists that you must read it. Arrrgh, Eat, Pray, Love, sorry, no thank you!


message 40: by H.B. (new)

H.B. Pattskyn (hbpattskyn) | 174 comments S.A. wrote: "E E wrote: "People recommend books to me or give them to me, telling me I'll love them..."

How awkward when a friend loves a book and insists that you must read it. Arrrgh, Eat, Pray, Love, sorry,..."


Hopefully I'm not offending anyone... my sister in law just lent me Like Water for Elephants, despite my insising that no, thanks, I didn't want to read it, and "missing" the movie hadn't been some tragic accident of bad timing. It was never on my list of things to see/read.


message 41: by E.E. (new)

E.E. Montgomery | 43 comments Helen wrote: "I didn't want to read it, and "missing" the movie hadn't been some tragic accident of bad timing.

I often think I need to expand my reading material and actually watch a few movies every now and then but I seriously don't have time to spend on things I'm not sure I'll enjoy to start with. I think it's better to spend my limited free time with something I know I'll enjoy and will provide the relaxation I need.


message 42: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Helen wrote: "my sister in law just lent me Like Water for Elephants, despite my insising that no, thanks, I didn't want to read it, and "missing" the movie hadn't been some tragic accident of bad timing. It was never on my list of things to see/read. "

That book isn't on my list. This past summer I tried to read a selection of NYT bestsellers that I borrowed from a friend. Too many of them fell flat. I didn't understand the fuss.


message 43: by H.B. (new)

H.B. Pattskyn (hbpattskyn) | 174 comments S.A. wrote: "Helen wrote: "my sister in law just lent me Like Water for Elephants, despite my insising that no, thanks, I didn't want to read it, and "missing" the movie hadn't been some tragic accident of bad ..."

Me either. Sometimes I wonder what the actual criteria for "best seller" really is--is it just that all this hype gets generated, so a bunch of people go out and buy a book?


message 44: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Helen wrote: "Sometimes I wonder what the actual criteria for "best seller" really is--is it just that all this hype gets generated, so a bunch of people go out and buy a book? "

I can't figure it out. Angelology is a fine example of the beast. Story line sounded great, cover was great, appealing blurb... and the book sucked dirty toes. But yeah, somehow it landed on the NYT list because the trade reviews were glowing. Can we say suspicious?


message 45: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments Why look, it's time for another excerpt. Guess what, more first person!

Excerpt from my romance Canes and Scales.

Blurb:

Prince Linden of Ardaul struggles daily to pull his country into the modern age by encouraging education and tolerance. But his brother Edward, the malicious King of Ardaul, delights in thwarting his efforts, and long years of fighting wars and solving conflicts have taken a toll on Linden's body and mind.

Weary to his very soul, Linden vacations at his cousin’s manor in an attempt to rest and recuperate. There he meets an alluring young half-Elven bed slave named Alasdaire, and his numb heart responds to the exotic Halfling's loving personality. But all too soon their tempestuous romance is shattered by betrayal and death. Can their newborn love overcome separation and pain?

EXCERPT:

I prepared to die.

My wild thoughts fixed on my poor Alasdaire. Sweet Elf. My death doomed him to lifelong slavery. Indeed, my death probably secured his death, so his slavery would not last much longer. He had tasted freedom's promise. I knew he would find a more lethal freedom preferable to eternal slavery. I saw him take the steps past our bench.

My cheeks felt frozen. As we spun toward death I tried to lose myself in a fantasy of my Elf's fierce love. I swore his gentle fingers brushed my cheeks. His lips pressed close. His black hair mass offered me solace.

The glider lurched down. Jenkins's voice broke in final frustration. "Prince, we're soaring down too fast. I lost the last updraft. I am sorry, my Prince for failing you in…" He shouted in raw amazement. "Wait, Powers on High, I see a farm ahead! Yes, damn, there's a field of damned tall haystacks down there! Yes! Prince Linden, pray now and hold on."

"Jenkins, I trust you above all." The glider shuddered and shook before I felt impact. My body soared out and upward, how odd to travel up when we just hit hay, until I slammed into the ground on my left side. The helmet protected my head from injury. Hay fluttered down like flat golden snow, falling to coat my face in choking drift.

What?

Wait.

I blinked in confusion. The prickly hay shower no longer plagued my skin. My goggles and helmet somehow vanished. My eyes focused until I realized I lay in a verdant valley setting graced by a stream. How did I arrive here? My eyes also told me I recognized that ancient oak’s twisted branches. How? I sat and shook my head. Above me the towering sky appeared magical, spreading above me in a wondrous dense black field speckled with so many silver lights. Did I fall from that vast cosmos of blazing stars? Did I become a comet? Amazing. Somehow I saw in the dark. Quite interesting. But why….

I stood and looked around in disorientation. The oak beckoned to me; more accurately, the timeless little Elven shrine tucked above it in a mountainside grove called to me. I knew that shrine existed since I visited it the last time I journeyed to Keith's many years ago.

I knew I needed to go there.

I stepped forward. Did my legs work? Yes. No pain or injury beleaguered me.

Why?

Was I dead?

My seeking fingers touched the oak's rough bark. The surface felt solid. Did a dead person still feel? How odd. My cured legs edged upward on the path until I stepped into the grove. A beautiful, tranquil sight filled my gaze. "Alasdaire!" To my delight my Elf stood serenely staring up at the numerous stars. A simple white tunic and black trousers covered his canes.

My Elf started and fixed his luminous violet gaze on me. Alarm suffused his burnished features. "Linden. No! Go back, my love."

What? "Go back to where?"

"You must return to me."

Why did my Elf speak in silly riddles? My laughter felt so fine. "But I am with you now, my perfect love. Why do I need to leave you to return to you? Are you teasing me?"

Alasdaire slowly shook his head. His fingers pointed at me. "No. I understand the problem. You are here with my sleeping spirit. You need to return to your body so you can return to me in real life. You cannot stay here."

My hands reached for his slender grace. "But it feels so peaceful here. Here you are free from the Catch and I am free from worry."

Alasdaire held up his right hand in sharp warning. His stare chastised me. "Are you such a coward to give up so easily?"

How harsh. "Why do you call me a coward?"

My Elf shook his head in scold. "Because you do not want to return and face your responsibilities."

I laughed in amazement. "Even in spirit you still act brash to me. You are correct. If I return and survive, then you also survive. I understand. I accept your eternal wisdom."

"As well you should since I speak truth." Alasdaire stepped close and stroked my cheeks.

We kissed until he drew back and shook his head. "Stop trying to tempt me. Remaining here in this eternity appeals too much to me. You must go."

"How can I resist your charms? Still, I don't understand how we meet in this manner."

"We meet like this because I love you. My profound love gives me a part of you. Your spirit wanders from your damaged body in dangerous rapture. Feel glad you encountered my love at this shrine. Other less kind entities prowl this hidden realm. I sense evil danger around us.” Alasdaire pointed toward the shrine. "Hurry, my love, press your hands to the stone canes and concentrate. We will be together soon enough."

"How I long to remain with you." Another kiss felt wonderful until Alasdaire pushed me away like I tasted foul to him. He pointed at the shrine. "Go!"

I accepted his physical rudeness. "Until we meet again in life."

His adoring smile soothed me. "Yes, my only love. Until that magnificent moment keep safe and remember our love. Remember."


message 46: by H.B. (new)

H.B. Pattskyn (hbpattskyn) | 174 comments S.A. wrote: "Helen wrote: "Sometimes I wonder what the actual criteria for "best seller" really is--is it just that all this hype gets generated, so a bunch of people go out and buy a book? "

I can't figure it..."


Definitely suspicious, S.A.


message 47: by S.A. (new)

S.A. (sa_garcia) | 302 comments I'm off to boil water for tea. Feel free to start a party and surprise me.


message 48: by H.B. (new)

H.B. Pattskyn (hbpattskyn) | 174 comments S.A. wrote: "Ack, the curse of having too many tabs open. I almost closed this page. Ooo, I need hot tea. It's nippy today and we're trying to keep the heat at 60 degrees. Brrr."

Canes and Scales has been on my to-read list for awhile... but I guess I like a little "lush and flowery" ;-)


message 49: by E.E. (new)

E.E. Montgomery | 43 comments S.A. wrote: "I'm off to boil water for tea. Feel free to start a party and surprise me."

I was just thinking breakfast might be good. It's 5.30am here.


message 50: by Silverus (new)

Silverus Snape (used to be  silver pixie) (silverpixies) | 3 comments I am debating posting a snippet of my WIP


« previous 1 3 4 5
back to top