The Sword and Laser discussion

1Q84 (1Q84 #1-3)
This topic is about 1Q84
175 views
2011 Reads > 1Q84: Aomame

Comments Showing 1-10 of 10 (10 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

Jenny (Reading Envy) (readingenvy) | 2836 comments I'm about 100 pages in, but I can safely say that Aomame is one of my favorite female characters yet, and certainly my favorite from what I've read of Murakami. From the meaning of her name to her surprising profession, I don't want to put it down. Does she remind anyone else of a William Gibson female character, or have I just read too much of him recently?


Jenny (Reading Envy) (readingenvy) | 2836 comments Also her scary frown.


Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 2365 comments Aomame bored me for the first few chapters. She's picked up since she's started having sex with random men in bars, but I still don't enjoy her as much as Fuka-Eri and Tengo despite Fuka-Eri being a more cliched character.


Jenny (Reading Envy) (readingenvy) | 2836 comments Fuka-Eri is interesting too.


John (john) (dowdykitchenman) | 130 comments Jenny wrote: "Does she remind anyone else of a William Gibson female character, or have I just read too much of him recently?
Absolutely - she's fascinating. (I did just finish Zero History recently though.) Am anxious to find out if there's more to the scary frown; the first mention was so odd.


message 6: by David (new)

David (Lawki) | 51 comments I have to keep stopping to pronounce her name as described in the book. For some reason this annoyed me. Like I had to add extra syllables mentally each time. Is this a weird thing to be annoyed about? But if it's the only thing annoying me, this will be great book.


terpkristin | 4120 comments I'm mostly listening to this one. When I heard the narrator say her name, I thought of edamame. Shortly after that, they said what her name meant and I chuckled.

I really liked Aomame at the start of the book, but I'm not sure how I feel about her right now (about 40% in). I don't dislike her, but she seems so far kind of one-dimensional. Real, sure, but only one mindset. Like a person I might get bored with in real life.

I like Fuka-Eri, too. But that might be the mystery around her (and guessing as to her past based on what I'm reading about everything else) is keeping my interest piqued.


Sean O'Hara (seanohara) | 2365 comments David wrote: "I have to keep stopping to pronounce her name as described in the book. For some reason this annoyed me. Like I had to add extra syllables mentally each time."

It's easier if you know the basics of Japanese phonetics.

* Don't use any stress; each syllable in Japanese should have the same weight.

* There are only five vowel sounds in Japanese - "a" as in "father," "e" as in "bed", "i" as in feed, "o" as in bold, and "u" as in fool. When the same vowel occurs twice in a row, it's just pronounced twice as long. If two or more different vowels occur in a row, each one is pronounced distinctly (except that "ou" is sometimes used for "oo"). If you think Aomame is hard to say, try the much more common name "Aoi" (Blue).

* "U" and "i" are silent when they fall between unvoiced consonants (k, s, sh, t, ts, ch, h, f, p), so "Natsuki" is pronounced like a Polish name, "Natski".

* "Y" is always a consonant -- the capital of Japan is not To-kee-oh. (And actually, both "o"s should be doubled.

* "F" is the "phu" sound you make when blowing out a candle.

* "R" ... I've never seen two pronunciation guides explain the Japanese "r" sound the same. Your best hope is to watch some undubbed anime or J-drama and listen to how the Japanese say it.

* There are two "n" sounds in Japanese. If it's followed by a vowel, it's usually pronounced just like a normal English "n", but when followed by by a consonant or at the end of a word, it's nasalized (like "ankh", "angle", "uncle", etc.). When followed by a "p" or "b" it becomes an "m".


message 9: by Ryan (new)

Ryan | 14 comments The F sound is actually regional. I lived in Japan for a bit and did some web consulting for some folks. They wanted their site listed in the Yahoo directory (yeah, this was 1999). Of the two Japanese folks I worked with on the project one said "Yafoo" the other said "Yahoo". Both were from different regions of Japan. The funny thing was that they couldn't tell that they were both making slightly different sounds, to each other they sounded the same. Along the same lines they both said "tofu" differently.


message 10: by Chris (new)

Chris | 2 comments My local library blog posted a link to a website that uses composite software (like they use for eye witnesses in criminal investigations) to create composites of the characters according to their description in the book. Aomame was one of the characters they created, frown included http://thecomposites.tumblr.com/


back to top