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Isaac Asimov
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message 1: by Almeta, co-moderator (last edited Dec 12, 2011 05:48PM) (new)

Almeta (menfrommarrs) | 1093 comments Mod
Isaac Asimov

Stephen King recommended "esteemed" author as mentioned in Chapter 2 of the Berkley's 1983 paperback edition of Danse Macabre.

From Wikipedia:

Isaac Asimov (January 2, 1920 – April 6, 1992) was an American author and professor of biochemistry at Boston University, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. Asimov was one of the most prolific writers of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. His works have been published in all ten major categories of the Dewey Decimal System (although his only work in the 100s — which covers philosophy and psychology — was a foreword for The Humanist Way).

Isaac Asimov is widely considered a master of hard science fiction and, along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, he was considered one of the "Big Three" science fiction writers during his lifetime. Asimov's most famous work is the Foundation Series; his other major series are the Galactic Empire series and the Robot series, both of which he later tied into the same fictional universe as the Foundation Series to create a unified "future history" for his stories much like those pioneered by Robert A. Heinlein and previously produced by Cordwainer Smith and Poul Anderson. He wrote many short stories, among them "Nightfall", which in 1964 was voted by the Science Fiction Writers of America the best short science fiction story of all time. Asimov wrote the Lucky Starr series of juvenile science-fiction novels using the pen name Paul French.

The prolific Asimov also wrote mysteries and fantasy, as well as much non-fiction. Most of his popular science books explain scientific concepts in a historical way, going as far back as possible to a time when the science in question was at its simplest stage. He often provides nationalities, birth dates, and death dates for the scientists he mentions, as well as etymologies and pronunciation guides for technical terms. Examples include his Guide to Science, the three volume set Understanding Physics, Asimov's Chronology of Science and Discovery, as well as numerous works on astronomy, mathematics, the Bible, William Shakespeare's works and chemistry subjects.

Asimov was a long-time member and Vice President of Mensa International, albeit reluctantly; he described some members of that organization as "brain-proud and aggressive about their IQs." He took more joy in being president of the American Humanist Association. The asteroid 5020 Asimov, a crater on the planet Mars, a Brooklyn, New York elementary school, and one Isaac Asimov literary award are named in his honor.

Awards

1957 – Thomas Alva Edison Foundation Award, for Building Blocks of the Universe
1960 – Howard W. Blakeslee Award from the American Heart Association for The Living River
1962 – Boston University's Publication Merit Award
1963 – special Hugo Award for "adding science to science fiction" for essays published in the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction
1963 – Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences
1965 – James T. Grady Award of the American Chemical Society (now called the James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry)
1966 – Best All-time Novel Series Hugo Award for the Foundation series
1967 – Westinghouse Science Writing Award
1972 – Nebula Award for Best Novel for The Gods Themselves
1973 – Hugo Award for Best Novel for The Gods Themselves
1973 – Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel for The Gods Themselves
1977 – Hugo Award for Best Novelette for The Bicentennial Man
1977 – Nebula Award for Best Novelette for The Bicentennial Man
1981 – An asteroid, 5020 Asimov, was named in his honor
1983 – Hugo Award for Best Novel for Foundation's Edge
1983 – Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel for Foundation's Edge
1987 – Nebula Grand Master award, a lifetime achievement award
1992 – Hugo Award for Best Novelette for Gold
1995 – Hugo Award for Best Non-Fiction Book for I. Asimov: A Memoir
1996 – A 1946 Retro-Hugo for Best Novel of 1945 was given at the 1996 WorldCon to The Mule, the 7th Foundation story, published in Astounding Science Fiction
1997 – Posthumous induction into the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame
2009 – A crater on the planet Mars, Asimov, was named in his honor
14 honorary doctorate degrees from various universities


message 2: by Rocio (new)

Rocio (scarlet86) | 50 comments I loved The End of Eternity !!!, I'm reading right know I Robot, i think that will be book #1 for my challenge.


message 3: by Almeta, co-moderator (new)

Almeta (menfrommarrs) | 1093 comments Mod
Scarlet86 wrote: "I loved The End of Eternity !!!, I'm reading right know I Robot, i think that will be book #1 for my challenge."

Good choice, I might copy you.


message 4: by Dani (new)

Dani I have been assigned I, Robot to read in another group. It will be my first Asimov. :)


message 5: by Rocio (new)

Rocio (scarlet86) | 50 comments Just a little tip a friend gave me "Don't expect to see Will Smith on the book".
I'm right now on the second story (for what I see is a short story then a large story in an big story, but still no Will Smith alike character, maybe later in the book on another story or not at all).
But anyway, is going pretty good !!!


message 6: by Almeta, co-moderator (new)

Almeta (menfrommarrs) | 1093 comments Mod
Almeta wrote: "Scarlet86 wrote: "I loved The End of Eternity !!!, I'm reading right know I Robot, i think that will be book #1 for my challenge."

Good choice, I might copy you."


You know, I noticed Fantastic Voyage on my bookshelf at home. I will likely read that first.


message 7: by Linda (new)

Linda Boyd (boydlinda95gmailcom) | 598 comments I tried to find I, Robot by Isaac Asimov as an audio book at the library - but have been unsuccessful so far, how is reading the book going??? Not sure if I want to read this one or listen to it.


message 8: by Debra (last edited Dec 12, 2011 02:59PM) (new)

Debra (debra_t) | 2574 comments Mod
Almeta wrote: "You know, I noticed Fantastic Voyage on my bookshelf at home. I will likely read that first. "

Some interesting facts:
Fantastic Voyage is a 1966 science fiction film written by Harry Kleiner, based on a story by Otto Klement and Jerome Bixby. Bantam Books obtained the rights for a paperback novelization based on the screenplay and approached Isaac Asimov to write it. Because the novelization was released six months before the movie, many people mistakenly believed Asimov's book had inspired the movie. The film was directed by Richard Fleischer and stars Stephen Boyd, Raquel Welch, Edmund O'Brien, and Donald Pleasence.


message 9: by Almeta, co-moderator (new)

Almeta (menfrommarrs) | 1093 comments Mod
Debra wrote: "Because the novelization was released six months before the movie, many people mistakenly believed Asimov's book had inspired the movie...."

Well, since I have it on my shelf I will probably still read Fantastic Voyage.

However, if I want a true sample of his work, I guess I should pick something else!


message 10: by Almeta, co-moderator (new)

Almeta (menfrommarrs) | 1093 comments Mod
Well, I finally decided to go with Tales of the Black Widowers, since I am more of a mystery fan than a SciFi fan!


message 11: by Debra (new)

Debra (debra_t) | 2574 comments Mod
Almeta wrote: "Well, I finally decided to go with Tales of the Black Widowers, since I am more of a mystery fan than a SciFi fan!"

I'm curious to know what you think of it.


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