Yoga Folks discussion

23 views
Living Your Yoga book discussion > Living Your Yoga part two--last 3 chapters

Comments Showing 1-8 of 8 (8 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Meryl (new)

Meryl Landau (meryldavidslandau) | 808 comments Mod
1) Attachment and aversion: Judith says, "though attachment and aversion seem to be opposites, they are actually the same thing." Do you agree? How do you keep yourself from developing unhealthy attachments? What do you think of Judith's mantra "How should it be?", meant as a recognition that you are wanting to make something different that can't actually be different right now.

2) Suffering: (We covered this a bit when we discussed pain, agreeing that you can have one without the other.) Judith describes some common reactions when unable to do a challenging yoga pose: blaming yourself, blaming the pose for being so hard, blaming the teacher for making you do it. Have you ever done this? Have you been able to shift your mind to end the suffering? Same for off the yoga mat, such as her example of learning that her husband will unexpectedly come home late for dinner.

3) Impermanence: This chapter deals with the reality that all of life is change. Yet that can be tricky in a relationship. Judith says, "Do you want permanence in your marriage? Then marry a dead man." How do you balance your expectation that your partner will be the same person you fell in love with with the reality of change? Have you practiced any of her mantras for daily living on this, such as "Change is not a mistake: it is all there is"?

Meryl Davids Landau


message 2: by Julie (new)

Julie (julie1014) | 195 comments . Judith says, "Do you want permanence in your marriage? Then marry a dead man."

Ha Ha! That's hysterical, lol! I needed that laugh today!


message 3: by [deleted user] (new)

1) Attachment and aversion: Judith says, "though attachment and aversion seem to be opposites, they are actually the same thing." Do you agree? How do you keep yourself from developing unhealthy attachments? What do you think of Judith's mantra "How should it be?", meant as a recognition that you are wanting to make something different that can't actually be different right now.

I agree in that they are both extreme viewpoints from which suffering is caused. Since reading this chapter, I've been playing just with labeling my thoughts as attachment or aversion. E.g.: guy goes straight from left turn only lane. "he shouldn't have done that!!" (and getting angry about it) is my typical response. This can be see as aversion (he shouldnt have done that) OR attachment (to proper driving rules). Instead I say..."shouldn't have, yes. But DID." It just is! :-)


message 4: by Amy (last edited Nov 16, 2011 08:54AM) (new)

Amy Greenblatt I agree. I notice this in a family member. She will decide she hates someone and then tell me why she hates her many times over. She nurses her grudge and feeling of hate and talks about the person often. She's attached to the person rather than indifferent.


message 5: by Julie (new)

Julie (julie1014) | 195 comments Meryl, I didn't know where to post this topic, so I'll put it here.

Even though I did not purchase this book, I just wanted to thank you SO MUCH for moderating yet another wonderful book discussion. Your questions are always wonderful and thought provoking. Even though I didn't have the book, I was still able to follow most of the discussion with your questions leading the way.

It is also wonderful conversing with like-minded people here. I have enjoyed reading and interacting with you all, and look forward to continuing!

Again, many thanks to you, Meryl, for taking the time to make it happen! Julie :)


message 6: by Meryl (new)

Meryl Landau (meryldavidslandau) | 808 comments Mod
Amy wrote: "I agree. I notice this in a family member. She will decide she hates someone and then tell me why she hates her many times over. She nurses her grudge and feeling of hate and talks about the per..."

This is an extreme version, but I suspect we're all guilty of this to some extent. It's as if we feel that ignoring something bad a person did somehow condones it. Yet I'm clear that, spiritually speaking, we do a lot more harm to ourselves (keeping us disconnected from our higher self) than the other person when we nurse that grudge rather than let it go. My sister likes to say that anger is like drinking a poison and hoping the other person dies. It's so true!

And thanks, Julie, for your heartfelt thanks, although it's a tribute to all the people on this message board (yourself among them) that these book discussions are so juicy!

Meryl Davids Landau


message 7: by Kris (new)

Kris (krisg11) | 40 comments Attachment and aversion. Jen said, "I agree in that they are both extreme viewpoints from which suffering is caused. Since reading this chapter, I've been playing just with labeling my thoughts as attachment or aversion. E.g.: guy goes straight from left turn only lane. "he shouldn't have done that!!" (and getting angry about it) is my typical response. This can be see as aversion (he shouldnt have done that) OR attachment (to proper driving rules). Instead I say..."shouldn't have, yes. But DID." It just is! :-"

Jen, your post made me realize I am attached to rules and what is appropriate, among other ideas or concepts. While I am attached, I have found that I don't need to get angry. It's outside my control and therefore, not something for me to worry about, Unless there is a chance the behavior could hurt someone else. I can see I need to work on my attachments and just accept what is.


message 8: by [deleted user] (new)

Kris- yes, I also am attached to rules and find it necessary to breathe deeply and accept that not everyone feels the same way! It is an almost constant opportunity for spiritual practice. :-)


back to top