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message 1: by Matt (new)

Matt | 1 comments The Seaside book club just had a wonderful discussion of 'Infidel' by Ayaan Hirshi Ali. It is a very informtive memoir of growing up in Somalia, Ethiopia, and Kenya to become part of the Dutch Parliament and a spokeswomen for gender equality in muslim countries and all over the world.


message 2: by Debbi (last edited Dec 08, 2011 01:58PM) (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
I read "Faith," by Jennifer Haigh, more than a month ago, and I still can't get it out of my mind. It's that rare, wonderful combination of plot and character. I highly recommend this title for readers who love to feel involved with characters and who also love being forced to think, and think hard. Amazing.


message 3: by Debbi (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
I read today that a film version of "We Need to Talk About Kevin," written by Lionel Shriver, will be out in NYC this weekend. It reminded me of what an intense novel it was. It's hard to read, but certainly worth it.


message 4: by Beckie (last edited Dec 10, 2011 11:22AM) (new)

Beckie it sounds like a great read thanks for the suggestion.


message 5: by Debbi (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
My pleasure. It's so disturbing and thoroughly engaging.


message 6: by Debbi (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
I will defend Stephen King as one of our great American authors until I die. I guess at this point, he's even established himself with literary snobs. His latest, 11/22/63, is just another example of his talent for combining breathtaking plots with something even more important: character. Yay, Steve! You did it again.


message 7: by Beckie (new)

Beckie i've never read Stephen King, always afraid of the horror aspect, but this is the second high recommendation for his newest book, so I'm going to start my Steven King journey with 11/22/63. Thanks for the suggestion


message 8: by Debbi (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
So glad to hear you'll give 11/22/63 a try! You might also give his collection "Different Seasons" a shot -- it includes "The Body" (the movie "Stand by Me" was based on this story) and "Rita Hayworth and Shawshank Redemption" (also a movie version). These novellas aren't horror, and they're very well written. Have fun!


message 9: by Tim Fredrick (last edited Dec 27, 2011 09:09AM) (new)

Tim Fredrick | 1 comments The movie adaptation of "We Need to Talk about Kevin" is well worth the money. Disturbing and well acted.


message 10: by Debbi (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
Thanks for the review! I plan to see it and am curious to see how closely it follows the book.


message 11: by Debbi (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
I started rereading the great "1984" while waiting for a YA novel, "Geek Girl," to show up after I had reserved it. So while I've put 1984 aside, I look forward to dipping back into it. Calling 1984 a classic is practically an understatement.


message 12: by Lianna (new)

Lianna Kelly | 2 comments I've become a Kristin Hannah addict. I started with "Night Road" and loved it. Then checked out two of her earlier works "Winter Garden" and "Magic Hour"...loved them too. Can't wait to get my copy of her new book "Home Front." One thing I can say about her books, is you need to have a box of tissues handy and be ready for a good cry.


message 13: by Debbi (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
I'm having one of those times when I've read a very enthusiastic review, only to be disappointed in the book itself. It's [sic], by Joshua Cody, and the New York Times gave it a fantastic review. Since I'm so far in, I'll probably finish it, but the writer (it's a memoir) is not someone I'd want to meet ... ever. Normally I avoid memoirs because the authors inevitably seem so self-involved. (Of course they do! They're writing about themselves.) Unfortunately, [sic] is bearing this out. If you want a nice, light read, go with "Geek Girl."


message 14: by Beckie (new)

Beckie Debbi wrote: "So glad to hear you'll give 11/22/63 a try! You might also give his collection "Different Seasons" a shot -- it includes "The Body" (the movie "Stand by Me" was based on this story) and "Rita Haywo..."

I loved 11/22/63. Thanks for the great suggestion.



message 15: by Beckie (new)

Beckie Debbi wrote: "I read today that a film version of "We Need to Talk About Kevin," written by Lionel Shriver, will be out in NYC this weekend. It reminded me of what an intense novel it was. It's hard to read, but..."

oh i jsut saw the movie, it was so very disturbing.


message 16: by Debbi (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
You bet! I just left QL, so I'll be commenting as a customer, rather than an employee going forward. Right now, I'm reading "The Last Werewolf" by Glen Duncan and like it a lot.


message 17: by Beckie (new)

Beckie I have just finished the distant hours by Kate Morton. Very slow beginning but once it starts rolling it really has so many intriguing threads. Really good read.


message 18: by Jenn (last edited Feb 28, 2012 12:22PM) (new)

Jenn Estepp (quietjenn) Oh, I really like all of Kate Morton's books - in addition to the Distant Hours, there's also The Forgotten Garden and The House at Riverton. They're a little soapy and melodramatic, but in the best possible way. They're all a bit like Beckie mentioned - slow starters that get really intriguing and engrossing once they get going. So perfect for just sinking into.

And Riverton is a good recommendation to anyone who is missing Downton Abbey.


message 19: by Beckie (new)

Beckie I'm reading the house at Riverton now, and I was thinking, oh good this is like Downton Abby! So I couldn't agree more Jenn.


Mary, Queens Library Social Media Manager Kearl I just finished reading "The Fault in Our Stars" by John Green. It was so moving, entertaining, and thoughtful I started rereading it just to get a chance to go back to that world Green so carefully created.


message 21: by Beckie (new)

Beckie Wow. Can't wait to read it. I love jOhn green and this book is on my list to read. Thanks. Mary.


message 22: by Lianna (new)

Lianna Kelly | 2 comments Jenn wrote: "Oh, I really like all of Kate Morton's books - in addition to the Distant Hours, there's also The Forgotten Garden and The House at Riverton. They're a little soapy and melodramatic, but in the bes..." I think I'll add The Forgotten Garden to my "to read list". Thanks for the suggestion.


message 23: by Beckie (new)

Beckie Little Women. Jo is one of my favorite strong female characters.


message 24: by Daphne (new)

Daphne (daphne2163) A Tree Grows in Brooklyn Francie is one of my favorite strong female characters. Second runer up Gone With the Wind Scarlett O'Hara is a classic!


message 25: by Beckie (new)

Beckie oh Daphne, good choice, two of my favorites.


Mary, Queens Library Social Media Manager Kearl I just read Salvage the Bones, National Book Award winner for fiction in 2011. And the first though that came to mind when I was finished was that it could be called The Grapes of Wrath for our generation. The subject matter is hard, painful, violent, and ugly, yet the writing is eloquent and beautiful. It was a gripping read--a Queens Library "Hot Pick," I was able to finish in less than the 7-day checkout period. Has anyone else read any of the 2011 National Book Award winners? Or any good new fiction releases lately?


message 27: by Beckie (new)

Beckie I just ordered Salvage the bones, thanks for the suggestion. I've been reading Kate Atkinson lately. She writes with such wit and humor and sarcasm, she makes me laugh, and also pause to take in the beauty of her words.


message 28: by Debbi (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
Kate Atkinson is terrific! I would like to read more of the National Book Award winners, but right now I'm *loving* Russell Banks's "Lost Memory of Skin." The guy really knows how to create ambivalent characters; nothing is cut-and-dried or morally clear with him. I love that about him!


message 29: by Debbi (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
Hey, fellow New Yorkers. You might enjoy Ben Winters's "Bedbugs." Oh boy, the creatures we all fear the most! It was great ... if you like creepy books.


message 30: by Debbi (new)

Debbi | 15 comments Mod
Latest recommendation: "By Blood," by Ellen Ullman. It's hard to describe, but has mystery and pathos. A good one!


message 31: by Kathy (new)

Kathy (kayleenyc) | 1 comments Just started the second book of the Nathaniel Cade series by Christopher Farnsworth, which is about a vampire who has taken an oath to protect and serve the president. Check out the first book, Blood Oath, if you want a fun, action-packed read.


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