English Translations of Scandinavian/Nordic Mysteries & Thrillers discussion

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Surströmming, Hákarl, Mämmi etc.

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message 1: by Fizzycola (new)

Fizzycola | 163 comments We meet lots of strange or bizarre things while reading Scandinavian/Nordic crime books. Or just different things, whatever you want to call them - interesting anyway.

The questions, answers and comments have been scattered among "real book" threads, Maybe that bothers those members who really want to discuss the actual topic in question.

However, understanding the culture of the countries we read about is part of diving into a new part of the world.

So, here is a thread for the cuisine, customs, scenery and other culture of the Scandinavian/Nordic countries. If you discover an interesting detail or want to find out about some pecularity, post it here! Anything goes!


message 2: by Anna (new)

Anna (aetm) | 228 comments Hey, I was just thinking this would be a great place for adding some Nordic food and recipes stuff too, in a separate thread from the whatcha reading now one. Good timing :)

Here's a few I had somewhere in the bookmarks for sharing with some friends:
Piparkakut / gingerbread cookies (I guess Finnish and Swedish style are much the same?)
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/15/din... recipe here
Tons of Finnish traditional home food style recipes http://www.finnguide.fi/finnishrecipes/ (see in subcategories)
Christamassy delicacies recipes http://www.finnguide.fi/finnishrecipe...
(of those, the only one in our house is occasionally gingerbread cookies, for hubby. I'm too lazy to make my own wheat free version).

Instead of the cassis glögg stuff I'd recommend the German Gluhwein. It's awesome for cold winter nights.
Plus Feuerzangenbowle - as the ingredients call for 3-4 bottles of red wine, a bottle of 51+% rum, I'd recommend drinking that in a largish nice company. (Recipe http://german.about.com/library/blfeu...) Not maybe purely Nordic, but since Glögg is a Swedish bastardization of Gluhwein, and Feuerzangenbowle is sorta like Gluhwein but even yummier, it definitely should be on the list. :) (many Germans have never tried that drink either. I picked the tradition in Ireland when I lived with a bunch of awesome Germans).


message 3: by Ken, Moderator (U.S.A.) (new)

Ken Fredette (klfredette) | 4227 comments Mod
Fizzycola wrote: "We meet lots of strange or bizarre things while reading Scandinavian/Nordic crime books. Or just different things, whatever you want to call them - interesting anyway.

The questions, answers and..."


I have to cook for Thanksgiving, and the only thing Swedish I cook is boiled rutabagas that my mother used to cook. What other things are there, any ideas???


message 4: by Fizzycola (new)

Fizzycola | 163 comments As you know, we don't have Thanksgiving in the Nordic countries, so to find equivalent dishes you would have to look at Christmas and the foods popular then.

Salmon comes to mind. Smoked or as lox or as gravlax (salt and sugar cured). Pickled herring of course... but that might be too difficult to prepare.

Ah yes, meatballs of course! Sweet and sour red cabbage. And kale prepared in the same way.

You can find lots of recipes here:

http://pattyinglishms.hubpages.com/hu...


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