The Invasion (Animorphs, #1) The Invasion discussion


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Does anyone believe this is an adult book disguised as a kid's book?

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Anna Lee This is my favorite series, and has been for a long time since I first read them in 4th grade. (I'm a freshman in high school now). My point is that over the years I have noticed that this series is something more than a science fiction series. It's a story about sacrifice and unselfishness. I believe the topics hidden within the pages on this kid's book are really adult topics. Does anyone else agree?


message 2: by Abby (new) - added it

Abby I read the series back in fourth grade too, and a couple months ago I took the time to reread Visser. I noticed a lot of adult themes like sacrifice and unselfishness, as you said. Also, Animorphs is a war story. You can't expect a war story to be completely innocent.


Anna Lee Another thing-the sacrifice isn't just the animorphs. Some of the yeerks sacrificed themselves so that they didn't have to invade a host.
I guess this book just shows that not any being is all good or all bad. The andalites aren't all "good" as they seem to be and the yeerks aren't all "evil" as they seem. The series showed that nothing is really as it seems and it is very relatable to everyday life. I think about it a lot, because even if this series was started 14 years ago, it still applies to reality today.
Your thoughts? Thanks for sharing, I appreciate it.


Dhfan4life I read these books around middle school age as well. And personally I never really thought of those themes as all that adult. I mean I grew up with learning about sacrificing things and being unselfish from my parents. And even more so when my family experienced a bankruptcy several years ago. So I didn't think nothing of it. But I do think these are still good lessons for kids to learn today and not be so focused on the "me" of things as there is something always bigger and more important out there for us to stop and consider and find a way to give back to. Or learn to give up so that as a whole the planet or family can keep thriving.


Laura I think not. Even though they have issues like that, a lot of other kid's books do and the writing is so middle school that I wouldn't think twice about this being an adult book. I mean, don't get me wrong, I love the series, but it's definitely one for kids.

Erin Hunter's Warriors series, wow, that is way too harsh for little kids.


Anna Lee What I really meant was that it is a tween book, and the writing is tween but some of the issues felt like adult points. I thought maybe the author intentionally or unintentionally worked in main points of more adult themed ideas.
But that's just a thought........


message 7: by Henry (last edited Jan 03, 2012 12:29PM) (new) - rated it 5 stars

Henry I agree with Anna lee. I think only the early books are kid-like but as the series progressed, they took a darker, very adult tone. The writer tried her best to keep writing the books like it was meant for young readers (sound effects, filler books, etc....) but the theme changed to a very adult like story. It's also the reason why a lot of fans had complaints about the final book/ending. I guess people felt "okay it's a young adult book, the author should give us a happy ending" I think I felt the same way too. But, this is a war book and to be honest, wars don't end happily. The ending made me depressed for a while but I still love the series. I'm definitely going to be re-reading them in the future, ha ha.


Anna Lee Henry wrote: "I agree with Anna lee. I think only the early books are kid-like but as the series progressed, they took a darker, very adult tone. The writer tried her best to keep writing the books like it was m..."

Haha. Yes, I agree with you especially about the ending. The theme did change very much into something more darker. Thanks for posting!


message 9: by Nina ✿ Looseleaf Reviews ✿ (last edited Jul 26, 2012 09:01PM) (new) - added it

Nina ✿ Looseleaf Reviews ✿ Yeah, I agree that some of the themes were very mature, but that's what made them so great. I hate when authors assume that kids don't get things. I began reading these books in third grade and I probably read the last book somewhere around fifth or sixth, but all those "adult" themes made perfect sense to me. Maybe it's not the same sense they would make now, but something clicked at the time.

This reminds me of a time I was picking up some Animorphs books at a book sale (would you believe I still don't own all of them?). A father was telling his little kid to get something besides "junk" books like these while I, 17 at the time, was leafing through the pile. I didn't say anything to him, but when he walked away, I told the kid that these books were my childhood and to read what he loves. I'm such a rebellious bibliophile, haha.


Megan (I feel so old right now, haha...) I loved this series when it originally came out 14 years ago - I was in the store the day the next book was released with my five dollars in-hand and had the book finished by the time I went to bed that night. Then my mom picked them up and read it just as quickly.

I agree about its depth and themes but I don't believe they are too extreme for kids. I think that selflessness and sacrifice are very important. However, the idea that 'just because you are a good/bad guy doesn't mean that you can't do something opposite from what's expected of you' is even more important. I think that level of awareness and (dare I say) intelligence is something that should really be stressed in literature for all ages. The only other place I can (immediately) say this was brought up was in "Lord of the Rings." (Faramir muses on the men that have just been killed by his army and whether they actually believed firmly in their cause or if they just needed the money, etc.) But I digress.

I'm probably one of the few that loved the ending to the series. I thought it was honest and sad but therefore much more realistic. After all, we'd just read, what 62 or 64 books in total (when you count the Megamorphs, Chronicles, and Choose Your Own Adventure books) that dealt with all sides of war. She just couldn't give us a candy-coated ending after all that heartache.

Anywhoo, SO glad to meet more Animorph fans! Does anyone remember the TV show?! (Why did I throw away those VHS tapes I recorded it on? lol!)


Megan P.S. I always viewed the maturity level of the writing going up because the audience was growing up. By the time it finished, I was in high school. I might have walked away if they were still fluffy for fourth graders... well, maybe not. In any case, she's not the first and won't be the last to do it. J.K. Rowling freely admitted that she amped up the maturity to correspond with the age level of the targeted "Harry Potter" fans. Long series should mature with age!


Laura Megan wrote: "...I'm probably one of the few that loved the ending to the series..."

I LOVE the ending to the series. It was sooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo perfect. I was so worried it would be stupid and lame, but it couldn't have been better.


message 13: by Anny (new) - rated it 4 stars

Anny I read it during my teenage years and yes I believe this book could be intended for a mature audience. The moral struggles they face were real and their mistakes made them all the more human.

I especially love the ending, no 'everyone lives happily ever after' that teaches you that "that's what really happened in real world kids".


message 14: by Faye (new) - rated it 4 stars

Faye Haha


message 15: by Emilie (last edited Jun 02, 2013 01:49AM) (new) - rated it 4 stars

Emilie There are a lot of children's books about sacrifice tho. I kinda disagree with the notion that a book for kids with themes such as sacrifice and unselfishness are actually "disguised" books for an adult audience. Look at Astrid Lindgren's "The Brothers Lionheart" and while we're at it, "Mio, My Son". Or "Homecoming" by Cynthia Voigt. Even Roald Dahl's "BFG" takes up the themes discussed above.
So I don't agree that the "Animorph"-series are adult books in disguise, so to speak, but rather children's books that can be appreciated by an older audience as well.

#thanksforyourtime


message 16: by Kaj (new) - rated it 4 stars

Kaj Samuelsson Emilie wrote: "There are a lot of children's books about sacrifice tho. I kinda disagree with the notion that a book for kids with themes such as sacrifice and unselfishness are actually "disguised" books for an ..."
Well said, I definitely agree with you on that point. They can definitely be enjoyed by young and old. And that reminds me that I need to read Astrid Lindgren again, maybe in English this time. Thanks for the reminder :)


Emilie Kaj wrote: "Emilie wrote: "There are a lot of children's books about sacrifice tho. I kinda disagree with the notion that a book for kids with themes such as sacrifice and unselfishness are actually "disguised..."

Reading them in English would indeed make it interesting. XD


message 18: by [deleted user] (new)

I agree. It got a little dark for younger kids, even though it was in a forum of a child's book. Got confusing.


Slip! OMMMM GGG this was my CHILDHOOD, right along side with the Warriors series.

Seriously, loved this stuff. And even as a 20 almost 21 year old, I WILL be rereading this, and soon. Cuz childhood.


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