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MILITARY HISTORY > SPECIAL PEOPLE: MEDICS/PADRES/CHAPLAINS

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message 1: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 06, 2011 06:19PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
This thread was recommended by Geevee and Aussie Rick to commemorate those brave souls who provided spiritual and medical help to our military in less than ideal circumstances. These situations were highly hazardous and dangerous and it took a special kind of person with enormous courage to satisfy the requirements for these positions.

This thread is focused on the lives and actions of these brave men and women who performed these duties with undaunted courage.


message 2: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) Thanks for opening this thread up Bentley. The one book that I read recently on this subject and which I found to be an excellent account of these brave men and women was; "Medic" by John Nichol


Medic Saving Lives - from Dunkirk to Afghanistan by John Nichol by John Nichol
Description:
Their job is to put themselves in the heart of danger – to run into battle to rescue the wounded and to risk their own lives to try and save the dying. Doctors, nurses, medics and stretcher bearers go where the bullets are thickest, through bomb alleys and mine fields, ducking mortars and rockets, wherever someone is hit and the shout goes up – ‘Medic! We need a medic over here!’ War at its rawest is their domain, an ugly place of shattered bodies, severed limbs, broken heads and death.

This is the story of those brave men – and, increasingly in this day and age, women – who go to war armed with bandages not bombs, scalpels not swords, and put saving life above taking life. Many have died in the process, the ultimate sacrifice for others. But wherever the cry of ‘Medic!’ is heard, it will be answered. From the beaches of Dunkirk to the desert towns of Afghanistan, there can be no nobler cause.


message 3: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) Here is another book on the same subject but from the American armed forces that may interest readers:

Doc Heroic Stories of Medics,Corpsmen,and Surgeons in Combat by Mark R. Littleton by Mark R. Littleton
Description:
The most decorated solder in World War I was not Sergeant Alvin York, as many believe, but a stretcher bearer named Charles Denver Barger. And Barger is just one of the legion of military medical personnel whose lifesaving feats are remembered in this inspiring volume. A tribute to those who tend the sick and wounded under the toughest conditions, Doc is made up of the sometimes humorous, often harrowing, and always heartfelt memoirs of quick-thinking medics and heroic nurses, of surgeons and physicians equipped with only the tools of mercy, performing acts of great courage.


message 4: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
You are welcome; you are off to a good start.


message 5: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) Here is another new book covering Iraq but from a different angle; "Memoirs from Babylon: A Combat Chaplain's Life in Iraq's Triangle of Death" by Jeff Bryan.

Memoirs from Babylon A Combat Chaplain's Life in Iraq's Triangle of Death by Jeff Bryan by Jeff Bryan
Description:
America's unofficial nightmare during the Iraq War was the infamous Triangle of Death, sometimes referred to by Iraqis as the Graveyard of the Americans. While serving in the Triangle, Chaplain Jeff Bryan ministered to a 1,200-man infantry task force, often while patrolling streets, fields, and villages as his unit cleared them in close-quarters combat.
During the most violent and controversial phase of the war, Chaplain Bryan brought God to the American warrior. He witnessed life, death, and faith at every level, including a worst-case scenario in which several troops in his unit were ambushed and captured. Memoirs from Babylon is a dramatic account of humanity at its best and worst, a gut-wrenching experience of fear and faith under fire. Chaplain Bryan's story is a unique combination of life, leadership, military history, and God-centered hope in the midst of America's nightmare.


message 6: by Geevee (new)

Geevee Bentley,
Thank you for starting this thread. Here are some I have read in this area.

The Torn Horizon: The Airborne Chaplains at Arnhem by C. Van Roekel (No cover or author photo)

Chavasse, Double VC by Ann Clayton by Ann Clayton

Arnhem Doctor (Spellmount Classics) by Stuart Mawson by Stuart Mawson

The Red and Green Life Machine by Rick Jolly by Rick Jolly

These three I have on my TBR:

The Royal Army Chaplains' Department, 1796-1953 Clergy Under Fire (Studies in Modern British Religious History) by M.F. Snape by M.F. Snape

The Cross of Anzac Australian Catholic Service Chaplains by Tom Johnstone by Tom Johnstone

Padres in No Man's Land Canadian Chaplains and the Great War (Mcgill-Queen's Studies in the History of Religion) by Duff Crerar by Duff Crerar


message 7: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (last edited Nov 07, 2011 12:59PM) (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Chissy, I am sorry but we have rules for citations and there are too many books listed that do not have the author's photo if available and the author's link.

Remember, you have added the bookcovers which is good but the other two parts are mandatory.

Here is a sample:

Paradise General Riding the Surge at a Combat Hospital in Iraq by Dave Hnida by Dave Hnida Dave Hnida

If the author's photo is not available, you simply say no author's photo and add the other two segments.

I will send you a note with your copy so that you can add it properly.
You have added 8 books that are not following the guidelines. Also, we ask that folks introduce themselves and if you had one of the mods would have helped you with links and information to get you off to a good start. Sorry about this.

Bentley

PS: None of the books showed up in the copy so there was nothing to send.


message 8: by Chris (new)

Chris Ok, I'll try this again

I recently enjoyed reading this medic book:

Combat Medic Vietnam Combat Medic Vietnam by Craig Roberts by Craig Roberts (no photo)

I have these books on my shelf waiting to be read:

Mass Casualties A Young Medic's True Story of Death, Deception, and Dishonor in Iraq by Michael Anthony by Anthony SPC Michael (no photo)

On Call In Hell A Doctor's Iraq War Story by Richard Jadick by Richard Jadick (no photo)

These books are on my wishlist waiting to be purchased & read:

Saber's Edge A Combat Medic in Ramadi, Iraq by Thomas A. Middleton by Thomas A. Middleton Thomas A. Middleton

Blood, Tears, and IV's a memoir of a combat medic in Operation Iraqi Freedom by Elissa M. Lonsdale by Elissa M. Lonsdale (no photo)

Doc Heroic Stories of Medics,Corpsmen,and Surgeons in Combat by Mark R. Littleton by Mark R. Littleton (no photo)

Battlefield Angels (General Military) by Scott McGaugh by Scott McGaugh (no photo)

Paradise General Riding the Surge at a Combat Hospital in Iraq by Dave Hnida by Dave Hnida Dave Hnida


message 9: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Great job and thank you.


message 10: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) Good books there Chrissy, I have "Paradise General" to read one day soon.

Paradise General Riding the Surge at a Combat Hospital in Iraq by Dave Hnida by Dave Hnida Dave Hnida


message 11: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) Here is a recent account covering a Padre during WW1:



Fighting Padre Pat Leonard's Letters From the Trenches 1915-1918 by Pat Leonard by Pat Leonard
Description:
Pat Leonard served throughout the Great War as a Chaplain to the Forces in France, Belgium and, after the Armistice, in Germany. Along with the many hundreds of letters he wrote to the relatives of those 'parishioners' who died or were wounded, he found time to describe for his parents back at home the awful reality of life in the Trenches, and on the makeshift aerodromes from which the pilots of the Royal Flying Corps operated from the Observer's seat which liberated his spirit from the mud of Flanders.

Very much a 'front-line' priest, his descriptions provide an unusually objective view of army life, and of the job of the multitasked chaplain who was expected to undertake the roles of counselor, comforter, caterer, censor, entertainment officer and sports supreme to name but a few. The extracts selected from his letters are full of detail, humor, self deprecation and just sometimes when judged by today's standards, mild 'political incorrectness'! Known as 'a veritable fighting parson' (because of his prowess in the boxing ring) he also played rugby for the RAF, was mentioned in dispatches, and was decorated for bravery.

90 years have passed before this opportunity arises to share his account of a life which the world remembers as 'dreadful beyond belief'. Reading it demonstrates that despite the ghastliness, human qualities emerged with which we should all be proud. Pat Leonard was born in 1889 into a clergy family in Cumbria, MPG (Pat) Leonard went from being Head of School at Rossall to Oriel College, Oxford on a mathematics scholarship. After graduating and obtaining a TA Commission in the King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, Leonard served as a curate in a Manchester parish before being accepted as Chaplain to the 8th Battalion, the King's Own, from September 1915 in the battlefields of the Somme Awarded the DSO for bravery and mentioned in dispatches, he transferred to the RFC in early 1918.


message 12: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) Another book covering a man of God during the Great War:


To War With God by Peter Fiennes by Peter Fiennes
Description:
To War With God is the moving account of Anglican chaplain Edward Montmorency 'Monty' Guilford's service in the First World War. Written by his grandson, it draws on first-hand material, including Monty's diaries, photographs and letters, tracing his journey from his first days on the Somme through the mud and terror of Cambrai to Belgium and the Army of Occupation. Along the way, Monty won the MC but lost his faith.

The book also looks at the war lives of four men who had a powerful influence on Monty: his beloved brother-in-law Jack Bigger, who went missing after only days at the Front; his friend 'Pullthrough', a poet and author of scintillating letters; Private Joseph Bateman, executed for desertion, who spent his last night with Monty; and Dick Sheppard, the pacifist preacher who helped Monty back to health after the war.

To War With God shows a man's faith in God being tested by an onslaught of horror. But it also shows the joy, the confusion and the humour of life as a clergyman in the war to end all wars.


message 13: by 'Aussie Rick' (last edited Nov 16, 2011 05:45PM) (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) From a more modern conflict is this book:



Faith Under Fire by Eve Conant by Eve Conant
Description:
As he left for his second tour of duty as an Army chaplain in Iraq, Roger Benimoff noted in his journal: I am excited and I am scared. I am on fire for God...He is my hope, strength, and focus.

But not long after returning to Iraq, the burdens of his job–the memorial services for soldiers killed in action, the therapy sessions after contact with the enemy, the perilous excursions “outside the wire” while under enemy fire–began to overwhelm him. Amid the dust, heat, and blood of Iraq, Benimoff felt the pillar of strength he’d always relied on to hold him up–his faith in God–begin to crumble.

Unable to make sense of the senseless, Benimoff turned to his journal. What did it mean to believe in a God who would allow the utter horror and injustice of war? Did He want these brave young men and women to die? In his darkest moment, Benimoff wrote: Why am I so angry? I do not want anything to do with God. I am sick of religion. It is a crutch for the weak.

Benimoff’s spiritual crisis heightened upon his return home to Fort Carson, Colorado. He withdrew emotionally from wife and sons, creating tensions that threatened to shatter the family. He was assigned to work at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, where he counseled returning soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder–until he was diagnosed himself with PTSD.

Finding himself in the role of patient rather than caregiver, connecting as an equal with his fellow sufferers, and revisiting scriptural readings that once again rang with meaning and truth, he began his most decisive battle: for the love of his family and for the chance to once again open his heart to the healing grace of God.

Intimate and powerful, drawing on Benimoff’s and his wife’s journals, Faith Under Fire chronicles a spiritual struggle through war, loss, and the hard process of learning to believe again.


message 14: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) Two other books from the Great War covering men of God and the troops in the front line:


The Whole Armour of God Anglican Army Chaplains in the Great War by Linda Parker by Linda Parker
Description:
The Whole Armour of God" examines and reassesses the role of the Anglican army chaplains in the Great War. The tensions and ambiguities of their role in the trenches resulted in criticism of their achievements. As with other groups such as army generals, the chaplains were given a bad press in the general disenchantment and iconoclasm of the 1920's and 30's. Popular literary figures such as Robert Graves and Siegfried Sassoon were particularly scathing and spoke to a wide audience. This book seeks to readdress the balance by using the words and actions of the chaplains themselves, interwoven into the events of the war, to show that many strove valiantly to bring the reality of God to the troops in the maelstrom of war. They gave a great deal of thought to the often conflicting demands of providing for the material and social needs of their men and maintaining their more spiritual role. It explains how they overturned orders and won the right to be with the troops in the front line. It tries to judge the chaplains by the ideas and standards of the time. In February 1919 the Army Chaplains Department was awarded the accolade of being made the Royal Army Chaplains Department in recognition of its work in the war. There is compelling evidence that subsequently the Chaplains have been judged too harshly. "The Whole Armour of God" argues that the Anglican Chaplains should be given their rightful place in the history of the Great War.

Faith Under Fire by Edward Madigan by Edward Madigan
Description:
In the years following the end of the Great War, a number of texts were published by British veterans that portrayed the Anglican army chaplains with whom they had served in an extremely negative light. The writers who produced this literature painted a picture of a group of ineffectual cowards who lacked spirituality and conviction, and who served no useful purpose at the front. Faith under Fire explores the wartime experiences of Anglican padres and argues that while this bad press was perhaps inspired by very real impressions, the picture it provides is far from complete. Drawing on a wealth of fascinating original sources, this detailed study examines the role of army chaplains on active service, their impact on troop morale, views on the faith of the soldiers who bore the brunt of the fighting, personal relations with these men, and the social and political projects they pioneered in post-war Britain.


message 15: by Edward (new)

Edward Lengel (edwardlengel) | 21 comments If I may add this superb memoir of a British nurse who served on the Russian front in World War I: With the Armies of the Tsar by Florence Farmborough by Florence Farmborough. I can't understand why this wonderful work hasn't been more widely read.

Another unjustly overlooked WWI personal account, is of conscientious objector Frank Dunham, who became a stretcher bearer on the western front in World War I: The long carry; The journal of stretcher bearer Frank Dunham, 1916-18 by Frank Dunham by Frank Dunham.


message 16: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) Hi Edward, glad you mentioned Florence Farmborough's book. I puchased a second-hand hard back copy after reading about her book somewhere else and I am yet to read it. From what I have heard and from the pages I have browsed through it looks like an excellent account.

With the Armies of the Tsar by Florence Farmborough by Florence Farmborough

Another first-hand account covering the expereinces of stretcher-bearers during the Great War is:

Hell, Hope And Heroes Life in the Field Ambulance in World War I by Roy Ramsay by Roy Ramsay


message 17: by Geevee (new)

Geevee Edward wrote: "If I may add this superb memoir of a British nurse who served on the Russian front in World War I: With the Armies of the Tsar by Florence Farmborough by Florence Farmborough. I can't u..."

Edward thank you. It looks very interesting especially with the Russian aspect.


message 18: by 'Aussie Rick' (new)

'Aussie Rick' (aussierick) Nearly forgot this one:



ROAD TO ST. JULIEN The Letters of a Stretcher-Bearer of the Great War by William St. Clair by William St. Clair
Description:
William St Clair is perhaps the only soldier to have left a continuous account of his experiences day by day from the moment of joining up in 1914, through the years of horror in the trenches, to the march into Germany in 1919 and the long aftermath of trying to make sense of what had happened.

A private in the medical corps, St Clair wrote daily letters, sometimes more, to his future wife Jane. Often scribbled under fire, and sent in the green envelopes that were exempt from censorship, they tell of the famous battles of Loos, the Somme, and Passchendaele, as they happened, with excruciating vividness. They speak too of aspirations, of conversations, of literature, and of love.

Published for the first time, these raw, truthful, and deeply moving. letters give us what we have not properly had before, the voice of an ordinary soldier who is also a wonderful writer. The book takes its title from the village of St Julien in Flanders, where, in a captured German pill box, the mind of young soldier was transformed, an event that he later turned into an award-winning play.


message 19: by Nicole (new)

Nicole This book was just released a couple of weeks ago.

Serving God and Country: United States Military Chaplains in World War II

Serving God and Country United States Military Chaplains in World War II by Lyle W. Dorsett byLyle W. Dorsett(no photo)

Synopsis
In World War II, over 12,000 Protestant ministers, Catholic priests, and Jewish rabbis left the safety of home to join the Chaplain Corps, following the armed forces into battle across Europe, Asia, North Africa, and the high seas.

They were officers who displayed uncommon courage and sacrifice. They were men of faith under fire.

And they would charge straight into Hell to save the soul of a single soldier…

Representing America’s three major religious traditions, thousands of volunteers from across the country enlisted as non-combatant commissioned officers to provide spiritual strength and guidance for those fighting men who never knew if they were going to survive to see another day.

Armed only with Bibles, Torahs, and the tools of their holy trade, these men of God went wherever the troops went—from the bloody beaches of the Normandy Invasion to the hellish jungles of Guadalcanal and Okinawa in the Pacific. They prayed over men about to march into combat on land, sailors facing Kamikaze attacks at sea, and bomber crews who could neither retreat nor surrender in the air. And, most important and difficult of all, they guided fallen fighting men of every faith as they breathed their last, and gave up their lives in the fight against tyranny.

These are the personal stories of some of the bravest and most selfless men who served with the armed forces. Many lost their lives or suffered debilitating wounds while serving as pastors to the troops. All of them battled the pain of separation from their own loved ones as they gave some of the best years of their lives to keep the military personnel spiritually awake, morally fit—and prepared to make the journey from this world to the next without fear or despair, and with the trust of the Almighty in their hearts.


message 20: by Bryan (last edited Aug 29, 2012 01:20PM) (new)

Bryan Craig Public Health and the U.S. Military

Public Health and the Us Military by Bobby A. Wintermute Bobby A. Wintermute

Synopsis

Public Health and the US Military is a cultural history of the US Army Medical Department focusing on its accomplishments and organization coincident with the creation of modern public health in the Progressive Era. A period of tremendous social change, this time bore witness to the creation of an ideology of public health that influences public policy even today. The US Army Medical Department exerted tremendous influence on the methods adopted by the nation’s leading civilian public health figures and agencies at the turn of the twentieth century.

Public Health and the US Military also examines the challenges faced by military physicians struggling to win recognition and legitimacy as expert peers by other Army officers and within the civilian sphere. Following the experience of typhoid fever outbreaks in the volunteer camps during the Spanish-American War, and the success of uniformed researchers and sanitarians in confronting yellow fever and hookworm disease in Cuba and Puerto Rico, the Medical Department’s influence and reputation grew in the decades before the First World War. Under the direction of sanitary-minded medical officers, the Army Medical Department instituted critical public health reforms at home and abroad, and developed a model of sanitary tactics for wartime mobilization that would face its most critical test in 1917.

The first large conceptual overview of the role of the US Army Medical Department in American society during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, this book details the culture and quest for legitimacy of an institution dedicated to promoting public health and scientific medicine.


message 21: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) This is not a book about the more famous Father Francis Duffy of the Fighting 69th in WWI....instead it covers the life of an almost forgotten priest, Col John Duffy who was at Bataan and was on the "death march". He was a true hero and I am surprised that not more is known about him.


But Deliver Us From Evil: Father Duffy and the Men of Bataan.

But Deliver Us from Evil, Father Duffy and the Men of Bataan by Dan Murr by Dan Murr

Synopsis
But Deliver Us from Evil, Father Duffy and the Men of Bataan is an attempt to reveal the pain and suffering Colonel John E. Duffy, a U.S. Army chaplain of the Catholic faith, endured from 9 April 1942 until his death on 4 June 1958. When Bataan and 70,000 American and Filipino troops were surrendered to the Japanese, Father Duffy was among those captured. He died at Letterman Hospital, The Presidio, San Francisco, CA of cancer and was buried there at the national cemetery on a hill overlooking San Francisco Bay. With him went the true story of his and his fellow prisoners of war ordeal. He was wounded six times, bayoneted and left for dead on the Bataan Death March but was rescued by Filipino Guerillas. He was betrayed and recaptured, survived the bombing and strafing by U.S. planes that sunk two Japanese Hellships loaded with U.S. POWs, a lack of food and water, torture by his captors and illness but still carried out his chaplain's duties. He was truly one of the little-known heroes of World War II.


message 22: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Thanks Jill.


message 23: by Stanley (new)

Stanley Lee | 3 comments I'd like to invite readers who like to read about military history to read this book. I have a couple of questions about it, but since not many people have shown to read it, I'm out of options.

I think this is an educational read on why wars happen and how the context relates to today's warfare.

The Genesis of the World War - An Introduction to the Problem of War Guilt by Harry Elmer Barnes


message 24: by Katy (new)

Katy (kathy_h) Thanks, Stanley. Anyone else read this?

The Genesis of the World War - An Introduction to the Problem of War Guilt by Harry Elmer Barnes by Harry Elmer Barnes (no photo)


message 25: by Bryan (new)

Bryan Craig I have not read it, Stanley; it looks like it was published in 1928.

The Genesis of the World War - An Introduction to the Problem of War Guilt by Harry Elmer Barnes by Harry Elmer Barnes (no photo)


message 26: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) The stories of the medical personnel who risked their lives to care for the soldiers wounded on the battlefields of WWI.

Roses of No Man's Land

The Roses of No Man's Land by Lyn Macdonald by Lyn Macdonald Lyn Macdonald

Synopsis:

Drawing on the experiences of survivors of World War I, the author wrote a story of courage and endurance: the story of men who suffered physical and mental wounds; of volunteer nurses transported from their drawing rooms into carnage; and of doctors struggling to cope with the devastation.


message 27: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Thank you Jill


message 28: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4284 comments Mod
Lest We Forget: An Army Ranger Medic's Story

Lest We Forget An Army Ranger Medic's Story by Leo Jenkins by Leo Jenkins (no photo)

Synopsis:

A rare look inside the life of an Army Ranger medic. The compelling true story of what it takes to become and operate as a special operations medic during the height of the global war on terrorism. Detailed accounts (and pictures) from the search and rescue operation for the US Navy Seals that were compromised in the mountains of Afghanistan during operation Redwings (best selling book, Lone Survivor by Marcus Luttrell) is just one of the many combat operations described in this thrilling book. Take a look inside the US special operations medical course as the author trains for the reality of combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. Lest We Forget is a respectful look into the reality of war and the impact it has on the individuals that have fought for the brothers to their left and right.


message 29: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4284 comments Mod
Battle Ready: Memoir of a SEAL Warrior Medic

Battle Ready Memoir of a SEAL Warrior Medic by Mark L. Donald by Mark L. Donald (no photo)

Synopsis:

As A SEAL and combat medic, Mark served his country with valorous distinction for almost twenty-five years and survived some of the most dangerous combat actions imaginable.

From the rigors of BUD/S training to the horrors of the battlefield, Battle Ready dramatically immerses the reader in the unique life of the elite warrior-medic who advances into combat with life-saving equipment in one hand and life-taking weapons in the other. It is also an uplifting human story that reveals how a young Hispanic American bootstrapped himself out of a life that promised a dead-end future by enlisting in the military. That new life begins with the Marines and includes his heroic achievements on the battlefield and the operating table, and finally, of his inspirational triumph over the demons caused by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder that threatened to destroy him and his family.


message 30: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4284 comments Mod
The Sword of the Lord: Military Chaplains from the First to the Twenty-First Century

The Sword of the Lord Military Chaplains from the First to the Twenty-First Century by Doris L. Bergen by Doris L. Bergen (no photo)

Synopsis:

The Sword of the Lord is the first book to examine military chaplains and the development of the military chaplaincy across history and geography - from the first to the twenty-first century, from Europe to North America. The scope of this work reveals the astonishing fact that the military chaplaincy has existed in a recognizable form for more than 1600 years. Contributors analyze specific historical moments in the development of the chaplaincy, beginning in antiquity and progressing through the Crusades, the English Civil War, the American Civil War, both World Wars, and the Vietnam War. Four key themes connect the chapters of this book.

The first is the basic issue of historical development over time. Where and when did the military chaplaincy begin and how has it changed? A second theme involves the emotionally and spiritually intense relationships that develop between chaplains and the men and women they serve. How have military chaplains dealt with the enormous responsibility of ministering to soldiers about to kill or possibly be killed? The third theme is that of chaplains' often precarious position between military and religious authorities. Are military chaplains primarily morale boosters, retained by rulers and military commanders because they prepare soldiers to fight hard and face death bravely? Or are they above all pastors, caring for the spiritual needs of their constituency? How do they balance conflicting duties and demands? A fourth related theme is the profound moral and theological dilemmas raised by the chaplaincy. Even under the least morally ambiguous circumstances, chaplains work in the midst of violence, coercion, and suffering. How have they understood their tasks and carried them out in deeply troubled and brutal times? What are the ethical implications of their work?

In addition to contributions by historians, this book includes vivid accounts by two former chaplains - an American rabbi who served in World War II and an American Catholic priest who served in Vietnam. This remarkable work treats with care and sensitivity a fascinating and important topic. Anyone interested in military history, religious studies, ethics, or pastoral care will profit from reading this book.


message 31: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Thanks Jerome


message 32: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) It is often forgotten that these men and women risked their lives every day bringing back the wounded from the front. A book worth reading.

Gentlemen Volunteers: The Story of the American Ambulance Drivers in the Great War

Gentlemen Volunteers The Story of the American Ambulance Drivers in the Great War by Arlen J. Hansen by Arlen J. Hansen (no photo)

Synopsis

The tale of the American volunteer ambulance drivers of the First World War is one of gallantry amid gore, manners amid madness. Until now this stirring example of wartime courage has been recounted only in fragments. Arlen J. Hansen's Gentlemen Volunteers brings to life the entire story of the men - and women - who formed the first ambulance corps, and who went on to redefine American culture. Some were to become legends - Ernest Hemingway, E. E. Cummings, John Dos Passos, Malcolm Cowley, Walt Disney, Dashiell Hammett - but all were part of a generation seeking something greater and grander than what they could find at home. What the volunteers found in France was carnage on an unprecedented scale. Shrapnel and barbed wire, the machine gun, flamethrower, and poison gas - all then-recent inventions - were producing casualties that overwhelmed medical facilities. Wounded soldiers spent hours, sometimes days, lying in squalor while waiting to be transported to hospitals on horse-drawn wagons. What was most critical was to get the wounded from the front lines to the field hospitals, and quickly. It was here that the ambulance drivers covered themselves in mud and glory. Featuring firsthand accounts, letters and diaries, and a trove of previously unpublished and rare archival material, Gentlemen Volunteers is the definitive book on this fascinating chapter in American history.


message 33: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) A tribute to the Marine medical corps during the first six months of the Korean War.

Intrepid Souls

Intrepid Souls The Story of the Medical Personnel and the Marines of the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade and 1st Marine Division at Pusan, Inchon, Wonsan, and the Chosin Reservoir During the Korean War by Bruce Williams-Burden by Bruce Williams-Burden(no photo)

Synopsis:

This book provides the detailed history of the Marine Corps and their medical personnel during the first six months of the war in Korea including their campaigns in Pusan, Inchon, Wonsan, and the Chosin Reservoir. Also included are more than 400 personal award citations for gallantry, intrepid behavior, and remarkable leadership.


message 34: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) One man's story of his experiences as a Navy SEAL corpsman

Combat Corpsman

Combat Corpsman by Greg McPartlin by Greg McPartlin(no photo)

Synopsis:

All his life, Greg McPartlin wanted to be a Marine corpsman, a medic skilled at saving lives. Three months of "bagging-and-tagging" bodies during Vietnam's Tet Offensive took the luster off being a Marine-but not off McPartlin's desire to serve his country.After assisting in the sea-recovery of Apollo 11-the first ship to bring men to the moon-the twenty-year-old McPartlin was redeployed to Vietnam as an elite Navy SEAL. Barred as a medic by the Geneva Convention from the make-or-break training considered vital to service as a Navy SEAL, McPartlin had to show he had what it took.

In a war where soldiers partied with their buddies in Saigon one day and crawled through an enemy-infested jungle hell the next, McPartlin proved that he was not only an outstanding medic but a real Navy SEAL-the toughest of the tough.

Combat Corpsman is McPartlin's account of his year in what had been a Viet Cong stronghold until the SEALs took control. It's the first inside story of a Navy SEAL medic, a man who wanted to heal-not to kill-but did both to save lives.


message 35: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) The personal reflections of a young medic in WWII and how he dealt with the horror.

The Medic: Life and Death in the Last Days of World War II

The Medic Life and Death in the Last Days of World War II by Leo Litwak by Leo Litwak (no photo)

Synopsis

Leo Litwak was a university student when he joined the Army to fight in World War II, "a na've, callow eighteen-year-old son prepared to join other soldier boys being hauled off to war." In 1944 he found himself in Belgium, in the middle of the waning European war, a medic trained to save lives but often powerless to do much more than watch life slip away. It was hard fighting that took Litwak and his rifle company into the heart of Germany at the close of the war. But Litwak learned there was more to war than fighting, more to understand than maps and ammunition. In the final months of the war, he watched the men in his company tenderly serve food at a Passover seder for a dozen brutalized Jewish women newly liberated from slavery. He watched those same men torture and execute defenseless German soldiers. He fell in love at the Moulin Rouge in a scene straight out of a Toulouse-Lautrec painting.

The men in his company were dreamers, thieves, friends, killers, revolutionaries, and heroes. They were the men of their time: sometimes brave, sometimes compassionate, sometimes cruel, sometimes loving, usually scared. They were held together by loyalty, only to be scattered by the war's end. The Medic is the gritty, wise, bighearted, and unflinching account of one man's quest to find sense in war and its aftermath.


message 36: by Jill (last edited Jun 26, 2015 11:49AM) (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) The most famous chaplain of WWI, Father Francis Duffy tells his story of the battles of "his boys", the Fighting 69th.

Father Duffy's Story: A Tale of Humor and Heroism, of Life and Death with the Fighting Sixty-Ninth

Father Duffy's Story a Tale of Humor and Heroism, of Life and Death with the Fighting Sixty-Ninth by P. Duffy Francis P. Duffy by Father Francis Patrick Duffy(no photo)

Synopsis

On the northern half of Times Square in the heart of New York is a square named after Father Francis Patrick Duffy, a priest whose faith in God was only matched by the attachment to his flock. He is mainly known for his legendary exploits as chaplain of the Fighting Sixty-Ninth regiment (renumbered the 165th in Federal Army List) in the First World War. The regiment, composed of mainly troops of Irish heritage, had historically been at the forefront of the Civil War fighting at Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. When the regiment marched to battle in the First World War, the troops were also mainly of an Irish Catholic background, headed by Father Duffy, who was never content to see the men of his charge go off to the front alone and frequently went into the maelstrom of battle as a stretcher bearer. Duffy and his regiment fought at Lunéville enduring a gas attack, before engaging at the Battle of the Ourcq and taking part in the two major American offensives at St. Mihiel and in the Argonne.

Perhaps no finer compliment to him was paid by the regimental commander who stated that he and his actions were the key to the keeping unit’s morale high. A fine memoir by a towering figure in American First World War history.


message 37: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) First hand account of the horrors of the WWI trenches and the nurses who tended the injured and dying.

Nurse at the Trenches - Letters Home from a World War One Nurse

Nurse at the Trenches - Letters Home from a World War One Nurse by Agnes Warner by Agnes Warner(no photo)

Synopsis:

Written from the French Front by a brave Red Cross nurse, these home letters were hurriedly penned amidst the incessant roar of mighty guns and surrounded by the wounded and the dying. Shivering at times with cold, and wearied almost to the point of exhaustion from working every day from 5.30am to 9pm, they give a fascinating glimpse into the life of a nurse at war.


message 38: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Thank you Jill


message 39: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Lovers of older film will remember the popular actor Lew Ayers, who during WWII, registered as a conscientious objector, thereby probably ruining his film career as Co's were shunned as cowards. But he did join the war as a medic in Europe and was welcomed (surprisingly back to Hollywood). This is his story.

Lew Ayers: Hollywood's Conscientious Objector

Lew Ayres Hollywood's Conscientious Objector by Lesley L. Coffin by Lesley L. Coffin Lesley L. Coffin

Synopsis:

Lew Ayres (1908-1996) became known to the public when he portrayed the leading character in the epic war film All Quiet on the Western Front. The role made him a household name, introduced him to his closest friends, brought him to the attention of his first two wives, and would overshadow the rest of his career. To be a movie star was his first and only ambition as a child, but once he found success, he was never fully satisfied in his choice of profession. Although lacking a formal education, Ayres spent the rest of his life pursuing dozens of intellectual studies, interests, and hobbies. He even considered ended his acting career after just a few years to pursue a more "respectable and fulfilling" path as a director.

Ayres was given not one but two comeback opportunities in his acting career, in 1938 and 1945. He was cast in the film series Dr. Kildare where he showed his abilities in comedy and his unique strength at bringing a level of sincerity to even the most outlandish or idealist character. But he was willing to give up his star status in order to follow his moral compass, first as a conscientious objector and ultimately as a noncombat medic during World War II. To everyone's surprise, he was welcomed back to Hollywood with open arms and new opportunities despite his objector status.

Biographer Lesley L. Coffin presents the story of a man of quiet dignity, constantly searching for the right way to live his life and torn between the public world of Hollywood and secluded life of spiritual introspection.


message 40: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) He made the difference for thousands of combat soldiers in the Pacific Theater during WWII.

Our Padre: The Inspiring Life and Stories of Fr.Kilian Dreiling

Our Padre; The Inspiring Life and Stories of Fr. Kilian Dreiling, C.PP.S WWII Army Chaplain by Joseph S. Smith by Joseph S. Smith (no photo)

Synopsis:

Our Padre is both a biographical portrait of a courageous and inspirational U.S. Army Chaplain during WW II, and a compilation of his most inspiring and heartwarming short stories. While most Americans have never heard of Fr. Kilian Dreiling, he was a true 20th century hero to thousands of American GI's who fought during General MacArthur's Pacific Campaigns, and to thousands more whose lives he touched during his 90 year lifespan. One of Fr. Kilian's many gifts was his ability to capture the most significant events of his amazing life in concise, moving, yet entertaining stories. Fr. Kilian's humor, wisdom and his keen understanding of human nature make these fascinating stories come to life, as he allows the reader to experience emotions triggered both by the horrors of war and the selfless acts of courage and compassion that he witnessed. These stories include fascinating accounts of the confession of a notorious Nazi war criminal, the liberation of over 500 American POW's from the infamous Japanese Camp Cabanatuan and many more. Our Padre is an engaging and compelling story of the life of one of America's greatest warriors, who never fired a shot in anger. Fr. Kilian Dreiling instead, utilized more powerful weapons like love, compassion, courage and a deep conviction to the cause of freedom and to his faith. His true enemies were not Japanese or German soldiers. Rather, Fr. Kilian's foe was the darker side of human nature, which manifests itself through many different forms including ignorance, intolerance, selfishness and greed. Both uplifting and engaging, Our Padre is a great read for students of history or anyone seeking relief from the barrage of negative news stories that litter our modern world.


message 41: by Bentley, Group Founder, Leader, Chief (new)

Bentley | 44167 comments Mod
Medic!: Part 3: Vietnam

Medic! Part 3 Vietnam by Yancy Caruthers by Yancy Caruthers Yancy Caruthers

Synopsis:

Medic! Part 3: Vietnam is one of six standalone true stories about real Army medical personnel in each of the living wars. This is the story of Ed, who after failing to find the adventure he craved, enlisted into the Army Airborne. He was trained as a Special Forces Medic, and soon found himself in the mountainous jungles of Vietnam. Hauling the wounded off the battlefield by air turned out to be all the excitement he wanted, as he found himself right in the middle of one of the war's longest battles.


message 42: by Teri (new)

Teri (teriboop) No Greater Glory: The Four Immortal Chaplains and the Sinking of the Dorchester in World War II

No Greater Glory The Four Immortal Chaplains and the Sinking of the Dorchester in World War II by Dan Kurzman by Dan Kurzman (no photo)

Synopsis:

The sinking of the Dorchester in the icy waters off Greenland shortly after midnight on February 3, 1942, was one of the worst sea disasters of World War II. It was also the occasion of an astounding feat of heroism—and faith.

As water gushed through a hole made by a German torpedo, four chaplains—members of different faiths but linked by bonds of friendship and devotion—moved quietly among the men onboard. Preaching bravery, the chaplains distributed life jackets, including their own. In the end, these four men went down with the ship, their arms linked in spiritual solidarity, their voices raised in prayer. In this spellbinding narrative, award-winning author and journalist Dan Kurzman tells the story of these heroes and the faith—in God and in country—that they shared.

They were about as different as four American clergymen could be. George Lansing Fox (Methodist), wounded and decorated in World War I, loved his family and his Vermont congregation—yet he re-enlisted as soon as he heard about Pearl Harbor. Rabbi Alex Goode was an athlete, an intellectual, and an adoring new father—yet he too knew, the day Pearl Harbor was bombed, that he would serve. Clark Poling (Dutch Reformed), the son a famous radio evangelist, left for war begging his father to pray that he would never be a coward. Father John Washington (Catholic), a scrappy Irish street fighter, had dedicated himself to the church after a childhood brush with death. Chance brought the chaplains together at a Massachusetts training camp, but each was convinced that God had a reason for placing them together aboard the Dorchester.

Drawing on extensive interviews with the chaplains’ families and the crews of both the Dorchester and the German submarine that fired the fatal torpedo, Kurzman re-creates the intimate circumstances and great historic events that culminated in that terrible night. The final hours unfold with the electrifying clarity of nightmare—the chaplains taking charge of the dwindling supply of life jackets, the panic of the crew, the overcrowded lifeboats, the prayers that ring out over the chaos, and the tight circle that the four chaplains form as the inevitable draws near.

In No Greater Glory, Dan Kurzman tells how four extraordinary men left their mark on a single night of war—and forever changed the lives of those they saved. Riveting and inspiring, this is a true story of heroism, of goodness in the face of disaster, and of faith that transfigures even the horror of war.


message 43: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) First hand account of the horrors of Vietnam as described by a corpsman who served there.

The Nam Doc: A Navy Corpsman's Story

The Nam Doc a Navy Corpsman's Story by Stan Gerding by Stan Gerding (no photo)

Synopsis:

There have been many books written about the Vietnam War and many were put on the big screen. Many of these films were very inaccurate about the story they told and people were left with untruths about the men and women who were over there in the thick of things. Many thought us as being mentally disturbed, not able to cope with reality, psychotic killers and baby killers. Many of the books written depicted too much gore and bloodshed and all the craziness that comes with it. I also was spit upon and called names by our own people when I returned home. I wanted to write a book about my tour in Vietnam with the Marines but I wanted to do this from the eyes of a medical person who was there strictly to save lives and patch up the wounded. The Vietnam War was a very controversial war that caused this country major turmoil in all of its cities. My book doesn't answer any one question but what it does do is give the public an eye view of what the military man and woman saw when they were there in a combat situation. The amount of emotional and physical stress that the jungles of Nam felt like, was like nothing any of us had ever been through before. No war tested the inner strength and physical endurance as the Vietnam War. War is a terrible thing, something that is not totally understood. Why do we do things that are a little out of the norm? What makes a person become so distraught that they turn to atrocity and lacking of any remorse? I hope you see and feel the horrors of war in this book. I especially hope you see the Vietnam vet in a different light.


message 44: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) Good Girls, Good Food, Good Fun: The Story of USO Hostesses During WWII

Good Girls, Good Food, Good Fun The Story of USO Hostesses During World War II by Meghan K. Winchell by Meghan K. Winchell (no photo)

Synopsis:

Throughout World War II, when Saturday nights came around, servicemen and hostesses happily forgot the war for a little while as they danced together in USO clubs, which served as havens of stability in a time of social, moral, and geographic upheaval. Meghan Winchell demonstrates that in addition to boosting soldier morale, the USO acted as an architect of the gender roles and sexual codes that shaped the "greatest generation."Combining archival research with extensive firsthand accounts from among the hundreds of thousands of female USO volunteers, Winchell shows how the organization both reflected and shaped 1940s American society at large. The USO had hoped that respectable feminine companionship would limit venereal disease rates in the military. To that end, Winchell explains, USO recruitment practices characterized white middle-class women as sexually respectable, thus implying that the sexual behavior of working-class women and women of color was suspicious. In response, women of color sought to redefine the USO's definition of beauty and respectability, challenging the USO's vision of a home front that was free of racial, gender, and sexual conflict.Despite clashes over class and racial ideologies of sex and respectability, Winchell finds that most hostesses benefited from the USO's chaste image. In exploring the USO's treatment of female volunteers, Winchell not only brings the hostesses' stories to light but also supplies a crucial missing piece for understanding the complex ways in which the war both destabilized and restored certain versions of social order.


message 45: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) The memoirs of a Corpsman in Vietnam.

Combat Corpsman

Combat Corpsman by Greg McPartlin by Greg McPartlin (no photo)

Synopsis:

All his life, Greg McPartlin wanted to be a Marine corpsman, a medic skilled at saving lives. Three months of "bagging-and-tagging" bodies during Vietnam's Tet Offensive took the luster off being a Marine-but not off McPartlin's desire to serve his country.After assisting in the sea-recovery of Apollo 11-the first ship to bring men to the moon-the twenty-year-old McPartlin was redeployed to Vietnam as an elite Navy SEAL. Barred as a medic by the Geneva Convention from the make-or-break training considered vital to service as a Navy SEAL, McPartlin had to show he had what it took.

In a war where soldiers partied with their buddies in Saigon one day and crawled through an enemy-infested jungle hell the next, McPartlin proved that he was not only an outstanding medic but a real Navy SEAL-the toughest of the tough.

Combat Corpsman is McPartlin's account of his year in what had been a Viet Cong stronghold until the SEALs took control. It's the first inside story of a Navy SEAL medic, a man who wanted to heal-not to kill-but did both to save lives.


message 46: by Jill (new)

Jill Hutchinson (bucs1960) I cannot imagine the horror that these nurses had to endure, especially in the Pacific, where Allied prisoners were treated more cruelly than in the European theater.

Pure Grit: How WWII Nurses in the Pacific Survived Combat and Prison Camp

Pure Grit How WWII Nurses in the Pacific Survived Combat and Prison Camp by Mary Cronk Farrell by Mary Cronk Farrell Mary Cronk Farrell

Synopsis:

In the early 1940s, young women enlisted for peacetime duty as U.S. Army nurses. But when the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941 blasted the United States into World War II, 101 American Army and Navy nurses serving in the Philippines were suddenly treating wounded and dying soldiers while bombs exploded all around them. The women served in jerry-rigged jungle hospitals on the Bataan Peninsula and in underground tunnels on Corregidor Island. Later, when most of them were captured by the Japanese as prisoners of war, they suffered disease and near-starvation for three years. Pure Grit is a story of sisterhood and suffering, of tragedy and betrayal, of death and life. The women cared for one another, maintained discipline, and honored their vocation to nurse anyone in need—all 101 coming home alive.

The book is illustrated with archival photographs and includes an index, glossary, and timeline


message 47: by Jerome, Assisting Moderator - Upcoming Books and Releases (new)

Jerome | 4284 comments Mod
An upcoming book:
Release date: November 6, 2017

Enlisting Faith: How the Military Chaplaincy Shaped Religion and State in Modern America

Enlisting Faith How the Military Chaplaincy Shaped Religion and State in Modern America by Ronit Y. Stahl by Ronit Y. Stahl (no photo)

Synopsis:

A century ago, as the United States prepared to enter World War I, the military chaplaincy included only mainline Protestants and Catholics. Today it counts Jews, Mormons, Muslims, Christian Scientists, Buddhists, Seventh-day Adventists, Hindus, and evangelicals among its ranks. Enlisting Faith traces the uneven processes through which the military struggled with, encouraged, and regulated religious pluralism over the twentieth century.

Moving from the battlefields of Europe to the jungles of Vietnam and between the forests of Civilian Conservation Corps camps and meetings in government offices, Ronit Y. Stahl reveals how the military borrowed from and battled religion. Just as the state relied on religion to sanction war and sanctify death, so too did religious groups seek recognition as American faiths. At times the state used religion to advance imperial goals. But religious citizens pushed back, challenging the state to uphold constitutional promises and moral standards.

Despite the constitutional separation of church and state, the federal government authorized and managed religion in the military. The chaplaincy demonstrates how state leaders scrambled to handle the nation’s deep religious, racial, and political complexities. While officials debated which clergy could serve, what insignia they would wear, and what religions appeared on dog tags, chaplains led worship for a range of faiths, navigated questions of conscience, struggled with discrimination, and confronted untimely death. Enlisting Faith is a vivid portrayal of religious encounters, state regulation, and the trials of faith―in God and country―experienced by the millions of Americans who fought in and with the armed forces.


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