Moby-Dick discussion

13 views
Lines & Passages > To sea (ch. 12 - 23)

Comments Showing 1-12 of 12 (12 new)    post a comment »
dateDown arrow    newest »

message 1: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sarahj) | 121 comments Mod
Add your favorite lines, phrases and passages from ch. 12-23 here. Unlike the discussion thread, you can add them here when the spirit moves you - no need to wait until we're all caught up.


message 2: by Stephen (last edited Nov 09, 2011 01:12PM) (new)

Stephen (havan) | 90 comments Chapter 12 Biographical It is not down on any map; true places never are. Makes me wonder how much good poetry the world would have lost if Robert Frost had consulted the trail guide.


message 3: by Donald (new)

Donald (donf) | 86 comments Read the Ramadan chapter,17, just before work this AM, where Mrs Hussey the landlord says she wants a sign saying " No suicides permitted here, and no smoking in the parlor." I get on the Subway and here it's shut down between 15th and 40th street - causing mass chaos and delays - due to a suicide on the tracks. Our Transit company needs a Mrs Hussey sign, that'll deter them!


message 4: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sarahj) | 121 comments Mod
I liked that one, too.


message 5: by Donald (new)

Donald (donf) | 86 comments From Chapter 16. The Ship:

"Captain Peleg, thou hast a generous heart; but thou must consider the duty thou owest to the other owners of this ship- widows and orphans, many of them- and that if we too abundantly reward the labors of this young man, we may be taking the bread from those widows and those orphans. The seven hundred and seventy-seventh lay, Captain Peleg."

Right out of the Karl Rove play book. "We don't need no Middle class!"


message 6: by Donald (new)

Donald (donf) | 86 comments From "Going Aboard" Chapter 21, the funniest thing I've read so far:

Queequeg gave me to understand that, in his land, owing to the absence of settees and sofas of all sorts, the king, chiefs, and great people generally, were in the custom of fattening some of the lower orders for ottomans; and to furnish a house comfortably in that respect, you had only to buy up eight or ten lazy fellows, and lay them around in the piers and alcoves. Besides, it was very convenient on an excursion; much better than those garden-chairs which are convertible into walking sticks; upon occasion, a chief calling his attendant, and desiring him to make a settee of himself under a spreading tree, perhaps in some damp marshy place.


message 7: by Sue (new)

Sue | 88 comments Donald wrote: "From "Going Aboard" Chapter 21, the funniest thing I've read so far:

Queequeg gave me to understand that, in his land, owing to the absence of settees and sofas of all sorts, the king, chiefs, and..."


absolutely the best!


message 8: by Donald (new)

Donald (donf) | 86 comments Sue, glad you enjoyed. That pretty much described
a large part of American society at the time of the writing of MB. But I never read it put so succinctly!


message 9: by Sue (new)

Sue | 88 comments The visual is hilarious!


message 10: by Sarah (new)

Sarah (sarahj) | 121 comments Mod
That is hilarious. Thanks for posting it for us to read again. The context was funny too - when the encounter the sleeping shipmate on the Pequod.


message 11: by Donald (new)

Donald (donf) | 86 comments Chapter 26, "Knight and Squires" Starbuck's comments
about fear and courage:

"I will have no man in my boat," said Starbuck, "who is not afraid of a whale." By this, he seemed to mean, not only that the most reliable and useful courage was that which arises from the fair estimation of the encountered peril, but that an utterly fearless man is a far more dangerous comrade than a coward.

As a Civil War buff, this comment about the dangers of fearless men, brings to mind 2 good examples: General Francis C Barlow and General George A Custer.
Barlow decimated his entire Division on the first day at Gettysburg by fearlessly leading an advance that outran it's supporting units; Custer fearlessly lead cavalry charges at Gettysburg and other battles, wearing colorful uniforms to further tempt fate. He is credited with saving the Union army at Gettysburg. The famous "Custer Luck" came to an end of course at Little Big Horn. Only one survivor there if I remember correctly and you don't count Dustin Hoffman!


message 12: by Stephanie (new)

Stephanie Bens | 19 comments Donald wrote: "From "Going Aboard" Chapter 21, the funniest thing I've read so far:

Queequeg gave me to understand that, in his land, owing to the absence of settees and sofas of all sorts, the king, chiefs, and..."

I marked that passage too. Absolutely hilarious!


back to top